What is it? Set 272

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I need help with two of them this week, one is obviously some type of clamp, not sure if we can get more specific on how it's used:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1543 looks like an old "Multilith" duplicating machine.
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I am sure not positive about any of these wild guesses:
1543. Some version of mimeograph machine. The wooden frame makes it pre 60s or more.
1546. Looks like some way of stacking loose hay.
1548. Looks to be tail pipe expander. Does the handle look like it has been hammer driven?
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I was also thinking it was a tail pipe expander, though I guess it could also be for boiler pipes as several people have mentioned. I sent an email to the owner asking if there are any marks on the handle, I'll let everyone know what he says when he replies.
Rob
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The owner replied and said there are no hammer marks on the handle, which means either it was an expander that was never used or that it could have been used for some other purpose.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

Most of the ones used for fire hose couplings are not used with a hammer. They are used with a press. Takes a BIG push to expand the inner collar. I only wish I could find a unit cheap... The average price for one starts at 4,000.00 PLUS dies and coupling sleeves.
--
Steve W.

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1544. I'm going to say mimeograph machine but it's way older than any I've seen. 1546. Hay Rake? 1547. Some sort of camera. 1548. Jewelers ring expander. These are the ones I'm familiar with. http://www.abm-corp.com/Abm_r2.asp Karl
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1543 Looks sorta like an oversized cigarette rolling machine, so I'll say cigar making machine.
1544 Portable folding... push down on lever at the left to lift the fork at the right, with no mechanical advantage.
1546 Lifts some harvested agricultural product into a collection wagon. Too feeble for sugar cane. Probably too feeble for hay, but I'm no farmer. What grows close to the ground and be picked up by the wire rakes? I'll make a silly guess... Zucchini harvester. :)
1547 Japanese WWII airplane camera.
1548 Guess... Purpose is to clamp 2 steel (or other material) plates together in, alignment, as part of a manufacturing process. Drill equal size holes in both plates. Shove the segment pieces into the holes. Shove the pin into the center to expand the segments, holding the plates in alignment and clamping them together. After riveting the plates remove the temporary connector.

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I found one by translating the 'type 89' written in japanese on the top. #1547 is a 'Rokuoh-Sha Type 89 machine gun camera"
http://tinyurl.com/dlnn8k
--riverman
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This is a better link http://tinyurl.com/ak6gss
--riverman
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That's a great link, thanks.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

1546 A hay loader for loading loose hay onto a wagon The small wheels are the front of this implement.
1548 just a guess on this one - a boiler tube expander?
Howard Garner ex-farmer
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1546 is a hay loader. We used them on the farm I grew up on. The metal wheels and and general look of this probably means it was horse drawn. And like the ones I am familiar with, were converted to tractor drawn later in their life. They are pulled behind a trailer or truck. You drive over the hay that has been raked into rows. It is then scooped up and loaded onto the trailer or truck.
And after you get to the barn, you grab big chunks of hay with any number of "hay hooks", that have been featured in this puzzle series. :) You use your horses or tractor to lift the hay up into the hay loft.
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Rob H. wrote:

1543 - Ye old hand cranked single tank mimeograph machine. That one looks to be about 1920s vintage.
1544 - instrument stand?
1545 - Maybe a keg/barrel opening tool?
1546 - loose hay/straw loader missing the wooden bed that kept the hay from falling through the chains.
1547 - Gun camera?
1548 - 2 1/2" swaging tool. Many different uses for them. That one looks like it may be for attaching the coupler on a fire hose.
--
Steve W.

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1546 didn't have a wooden bed, the pichup teeth brought the hay up unto the crossbars that traveled with the chains. They are close enough to keep the hay from falling through, and the wood slats on top keep the hay pressed down on the bars so they carry it up over the top. These came into more use after thew advent of the "side delivery" rake, which rolls the swathed hay left by the mowing machine into a windrow, then you use the wagon & hayloader to straddle the windrow and pick it up. Preferably, you have 2 men on the wagon, and the man on the back of the wagon works about 1/3rd harder than the man in front, because he not only has to "build" the rear half of thew load, he has to "pass" the hay to the front man for that half of the load. (DAMHIKT) Graduated from the kid driving the horses and hooking/ unhooking the loader to learning how to "build" a load of hay so it binds in and doesn't fall off the wagon.
Norm
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Nahmie wrote:

Most of the ones I have seen had a bed. I guess it may be a different brand? Did you ever get to use the reciprocating style? One of the locals has one and that thing looks like a mechanical nightmare in operation!
--
Steve W.

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Yeah, I've seen both types. If I recall, Uncle/s had a bed, but it was galvanized steel, with the oscillating bars on top of the hay to walk it up the bed.
Guess you can just call me an "Old Fart". Learned with horse drawn mower and "dump" rake where you raked across the mower swathsand tripped it to release the hay when the rake got full. A good operator could make a field look almost like it had been done with a side delivery rake, but a novice left it all over the place. When I wanted to rake, Uncle said "sure, just one condition, you bunch and load all you rake". I made about two passes across the field and decided that was enough for a start. Remember, this was BEFORE the hayloader, we had to bunch it with a pitchfork and then pick it up and put it up on the wagon. What a difference the side delivery rake & hayloader made! Then he got his first baler, a New Holland with a 2 cyl. Wisconsin engine to run it. WOW! Now we just had to pick the bales up and put them on the wagon. Of course, being "young fellers" we just had to show off(AKA playin' graba**) a little bit and launch them across the wagon at the guy loading from the other side. Next big step was the bigger tractor with a PTO drive baler & bale "tosser" that put them in a bale rack wagon. Had to drag Uncle into the mechanical age kicking & screaming, he really liked working with horses. Late '60s early '70s we took our three little girls to a county fair and were looking at the antique equipment display when oldest girl(about 10) informed us that "that isn't antique equipment, Uncle has all that stuff on the farm".
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I'd be willing to bet the hayloader is a McCormick- Deering.
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That would be a good bet, you're correct, it's a 1915 model.
Rob
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Nahmie wrote:

Spent a few years on a flat deck wagon pulling bales out of a New Holland powered by a Wisconsin 4. Being pulled by an F-20. I wasn't around for the earlier methods... However now I help out a few of the local Amish/Mennonites and get to play with the older stuff.
I enjoy field work but you can keep the haymow for anyone else! I HATED it there.
--
Steve W.

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