What is it? Set 270

Just one unidentified item this week, I have no idea what that thing is:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1537: Sewing machine part
1538: Holds a floor lamp
1539: Sounding torpedo
1540: I think the spring is being used as a bushing more than a spring, but that's all I can guess.
1541: Perhaps a truck for refueling a larger vehicle, such as a tank. I thought perhaps a flamethrower truck, but the lack of armor would make it suicidal.
1542: A wooden turbojet?
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snipped-for-privacy@grace.speakeasy.net (Matthew Russotto) wrote:

You did notice that it's 14" long right :>
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Patrick Hamlyn posting from Perth, Western Australia
Windsurfing capital of the Southern Hemisphere
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A really big sewing machine?
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1537)    Hmm ... part of it looks like a remote valve for a high     vacuum system -- the motion is transferred through a metal     bellows which maintains the seal. However, I don't see any     reasonable seals where flange mounting would be expected.
1538)    I think that this is upside down in the photo. Looks like it     might be for collecting "sample" being generated by the dog one     is walking. :-)
1539)    I think that this is a high-frequency antenna for mounting     on rather high speed jet aircraft.
1540)    This looks as though it were designed to transfer paper or     fabric from one wooden roll to the other, passing over the     free-rolling springs on the tops, and finishing up on the     second wooden roller.
    I think that it may be for holding something like a sash for     embroidery work. The wing nuts can keep the wooden rollers from     turning while you work on a section, then be loosened to roll to     the next area.
1541)    Interesting device. My guess here is a quick starter for     single-engined military aircraft. You drive the truck up to the     front of the aircraft, and slip the octagonal collar over a nut     in the center of the propeller, spin up the truck's engine, and     dump a clutch to spin it up quickly. I expect the clutch to be     a one-way one, to allow the engine to free wheel the coupler and     shaft. Once the plane's engine is running, the truck backs     away, and drives to the next plane to start it.
    Obviously, the period is indicated by the style of the truck, as     well as the fact that the planes did not have a starter motor     and battery.
1542)    Hmm ... some kind of small scale wind tunnel -- for testing     small models. Again -- rather old, given the predomence of wood     in the construction.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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