What is it? Set 269

Page 1 of 2  
Another new set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1529 A Minox camera. http://www.minox.org/minoxencyclopedia/r/rigacamera.html#top

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

1529 Typical "spy" camera 16mm still camera
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's 9.5 mm film. I have a Minox exactly like that one. And the black box is a container for a film cassette.
-- Ed Huntress
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Another new set of (un)educated guesses has been produced, too:
1525 - Looks to be a moulding plane, or closely related implement, particularly designed to cut narrow slots in wood a variable distance from the edge. I'd fancy the slot might be used to hold a piece of sheet tin or similar material, say when making a pie safe.
1526 - Which portion is the sharp part? If the half moon is not really sharp, I'd guess it may be a letter opener and envelope sealer, the seam rippper like bit being the opener and the half moon used to apply pressure to the moistened gummed flap of the envelope.
1527 - Possibly a fancy snow making gun setup from a ski area?
1528 - Holders for the slats of vertical blinds?
1529 - Photographic light/exposure meter
1530 - Ummm....some sort of tire changing/seating/manipulation tool? On the other hand, it looks vaguely evil, so maybe instead it's a torture device from an old prison.
Now to read other guesses....
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The small blade next to the point is sharp, and here is the owner's description of the half moon:
"As to sharpness, I guess you can say it is not blunt, but you can run your finger over it with moderate pressure and not be cut. It requires a fair amount of pressure to cut through a folded paper seam and the cut is not real clean."

Good guess, it's a tool for use with the old auto tires.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote: (...)

Bead breaker?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, for getting the tire on and off the rim.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm stumped! However, as a wild guess, 1529 resembles a plastic "citrus peeler" that I picked up in a grocery store some years ago aound Christmas time. The little tooth on the bottom is designed to slice into the peel and slice it open without gouging into the "flesh" of the orange, etc. Once you've made some slices(I preferred quartering the skin from top to bottom), you can then use the semicircular blade to slide under the peel and work it loose, again without gouging into the "flesh" of the fruit, as the blade is not really sharp. Just my .02 cents worth.
Nahmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1525 Inlay cutter. used to cut the grove for a brass/gold/ivory/contrasting wood inlay in a table top or box
1526 Letter opener. The flat part was to pry open the wax seal, the bullet part was to cut the envelope open if that failed.
1527 Look like some sort of rocket sled or similar. The steering wheel controls a high pressure dual valve setup to open the valve on that side.
1529 16mm "Spy" camera advertised in all the magazines in the '50s
Rob H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
and again some silly guesses from germany ...
1525 tool for making dimension lumber (in german: Leistenschneider)
1526 ?
1527 hm, the driver seat of my old volkswagen looks the same. (dont know from which plane or helicopter this is taken)
1528 something from a sailing ship?
1529 yep, this is model a http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?titletei:Minox_A_IIIs.jpg&filetimestamp 060216232505
1530 ?
greetings from germany chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    As always, posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
1525)    A special plane designed to cut a narrow groove a selected     distance from the edge of a wood surface.
    I don't see an exit path for the curls -- but I also don't see     all views. It could be on the side opposite the sidecar which     serves as a distance guide.
1526)    I *think* that this is a "case knife" -- used for opening     snap-on watch case backs.
    I'm not sure what the pin on the other side is for -- perhaps to     lever the case back off after the knife starts it open.
1527)    This looks like an astronaut's motorcycle. The various jets     around the device thrust in various directions to steer and to     move the device (and its rider).
    It *could* be intended for use underwater instead, adding     maneuverability for a SCUBA diver.
    I'm not sure whether the cushioned seat would work well in     either environment, however. :-) It depends on what stuffing it     uses. Almost certainly it would not like the vacuum     environment, so let's settle on an underwater maneuvering cycle     instead of a space one.
1528)    Hangers for old wooden Venetian blinds? The residue of oxidized     green paint in the closeups seems to match what I remember.
1529)    "Minox" tiny camera. Used a very small film -- smaller than     the 16mm ones which I have.
1530)    Part of it looks as though it would be usable for installing     nose rings in bulls. not sure what the other parts do.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How would they attach to the blinds?
I'm guessing that the flat part is intended to be imbedded in masonry joints (brick or block) with only the round knobby part sticking out. To hold something moderately heavy that needs to be hung and removed with out tools.
--
William

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    They would be screwed to the upright at the hinge end. (These are wood framed Venetian blinds -- with wood slats opened or closed by a vertical piece of wood hooked to the edes of the slats with tiny staples in both parts). The knobs stick up and down beyond the blind's frame, and pass through flat rings screwed to the top and bottom of the wooden window frame to allow the blinds to pivot.
    I've seen something like this in South Texas in the house in which I did some of my growing up. The green showing in a chip on the end of the knob in the close up is a close match to my memory of the very oxidized green paint on those on some windows on the house. It was about 1955 when I would last have regularly seen these (so I would have been about fourteen years old at the most), and I have no idea how old they were at that time -- but I would guess that they were at least thirty years old or more. (Rain was quite infrequent there, so a wooden structure like this would last a lot longer than here in Northern Va.

    Hmm ... the pattern of holes looks like they are designed to accept flat-head screws from one side rather than to be a way to bond to the masonry.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1525 I think this is for one of two things either it is a rather elaborate scriber or it is for planing rebates into wood? 1526 could this be a dentists tool? 1527 my first thought was its the seat out of a simulater but it i dont think thats right. However I hope whatever does not involve too much movement that shaft at groin level looks like it may hurt a little :{ 1528 ? 1529 stud detector? not sure why it would have dials however. 1530 i will have a stab at a farriers tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1525: Looks to be a slitter, for cutting strips from veneer or thin wood.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think # 1526 is an old-time physician's tool called a "fleam" used for bleeding the patient. Googling around yields images of implements with similar crescent shaped blades.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Jan 2009 19:58:50 -0800 (PST), humunculus
<snip>

I dug around looking for patents. Nothing all that close in letter openers. The Citrus peeler though... these are the closest I could come up with:
http://www.google.com/patents?vid 72243
http://www.google.com/patents?vid 15660
http://www.google.com/patents?vid%49326
http://www.google.com/patents?vid 72462
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, some of them are close but not quite close enough to call this one solved. I've done some searching on the various guesses but didn't find much.
Also, I added Charles' suggestion and riverman's (for # 1528) to the answer page. I'm thinking that sooner or later we'll get the answer to one of these, but I'll surprised if we bet both.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.