What is it? Set 263

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1489 Mapmaking device to draw contour lines from stereo-pair aerial photographs. The cartographer mounts a pair of photographs on the flat surfaces, aligns them, then looks in to see a stereo view. He can then move the pen along what seems to be a constant height.
1492 A couple of hypodermic syringe plungers?
1493 Guess... If there were mounting holes, the pieces would form a hinge (left piece down) so I'll guess they are used to form a temporary hinge with the pieces clamped on to the parts of a work in progress in a machine shop.
1294 From the size and scale (the handle is between 1 and 2 inches long) I'd guess this is a model of a heating furnace. Patent model?

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Looks like this is correct, I've found a few on the web that appear very similar.
Thanks, Rob
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    [ ... ]

    Which is very good when you are measuring out aggressive organic solvents, which would tend to attack both the rubber seal, and (perhaps also) the plastic body.
    Of course, they were reusable in that period, and glass is easier to sterilize than rubber.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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That makes sense, the ones that I have come out of a lab that was shut down, they did environmental work and handled a lot of acids and solvents.
I think they were directly coupled to reaction chambers and used to introduce measured amounts of chemicals as needed.
Some of the glass work that came from this lab is very complex, I'm not a chemist, so I can only guess at what some of it was used for.
Anybody need a zero air generator?
basilisk
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The only one I recognize is the coal furnace.
--riverman
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It's a salesman's model.
http://tinyurl.com/3zg7f4
-riverman
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1493 weld on hinge. http://www.hardwaresource.com/Store_ViewCatLevel3.asp?Cat 2
Third item down. I've used them in several sizes.
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Thanks for the link, a couple people had mentioned that it was a hinge but the link really closes the book on this one.
Rob
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rcm
#1494 is a model (or salesman's sample as previously suggested), and definitely of a coal furnace. I've fed such a beast. Below the fuel door is a covered water reservoir for generating some humidity, I believe.
The ring going around the "floor" of the model is where the sheetmetal jacket would fasten, joining to the sides of the cast iron faceplate/controls panel. The diameter of the beast was over 6 feet, but not more than 8 feet, to the best of my recollection.
The sheetmetal jacket was cylindrical, but had a tapered section at the top, for about 25% of the overall height. The round heat distribution ducts, with joints neatly wrapped with asbestos tape, were cut into the tapered "crown" section to distribute heat to various remote locations in the structure.
On the fuel door, and below the fuel door, there were a couple of small damper doors that could be operated remotely, by a chain control upstairs in the structure.
The little crank laying on the right side of the display model was for rocking/rotating the large grate bars to let the clinkers fall thru to the bottom, where they were shoveled out and put into buckets to be carried outdoors. The vertical handle was a sort of shaker, maybe intended to break up the bed of hot coals, or to assist in cleaning out the ashes.
I don't clearly recall the cold air return path, but there were the commonly seen tinned joist spaces and the wide cold air registers in the first story floors.
The combustion gasses and smoke went out thru one of the big passageways in that big donut-looking heat exchanger on top (to a damper before the chimney connection, and the other protrusion was a cleanout door.
Everything except the sheetmetal jacket, crown and ducts was cast iron, and all of the cast parts were heat exchanging surfaces.
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
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The link below has a photo of the grate as seen through the open door at the bottom of the furnace, the handle attaches to the part at the front left, your description of this mechanism sounds good to me.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album10/pic1494ngb.jpg
The handle can be seen in the bottom right of the third photo:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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The grate is called a 'shaker'. We grew up with coal stoves when I was a kid.
--riverman
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http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974Tryke
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Oops sorry about the empty post.
'shaker handle ' did alot of that untill 1970 And caried out a shit pile of asches in my life.
Jerry
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1489: Some grad student's way of finally seeing those darned "hidden eye" images.
1490: Ye Olde Fyre Starter 1491: Difficult to use rubber stamp 1492: In Texas, laboratory glassware is illegal to possess without a license because it can be used for making drugs. Perhaps England has a similar rule, and these are new drug-proof glassware.
1493: TP holder 1494: Portable heater/humidifier.
--
It's times like these which make me glad my bank is Dial-a-Mattress

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1490 looks like some elaborate mouse trap. Not sure why they didn't just give the mouse an easy way up instead of the perforated sheet metal though...
Larry
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wrote:

My guesses:
1489 - Machine for generating perspective drawings from isometric drawings/photos, or some similar purpose. Looking in the two eyepieces and moving the pencil around would, I assume, line up spots on documents on the two platforms, and that would indicate the correct spot to mark the feature on the "output" drawing.
1490 - Maybe a moustrap, the little critter climbing up the perforated tube and then being unable to escape from the cup? But it seems a bit small for that to work well.
1491 - Well, it clamps onto a thin surface or similar, and then, ummm...ah...erm...well, I guess it's so obvious what you do that I needn't bother explaining it.
1492 - Containers for reagents nos. 1 and 11.
1493 - Paperweight and runaway pencil catcher for the drawing board.
1494 - Cheating and googling revealed that this is a sales model of a Williamson Model A furnace, which I presume was a coal-fired domestic hot air furnace. In the basement of my house is a Williamson Oilsaver furnace of slightly more recent vintage (but still forty or so years old) that, at the last cleaning/testing, was found to be 81.7% efficient.
Now to see other guesses.
--
Andrew Erickson

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1491 is used for sharpening two man saws. I have one with a peice of file in it. I don't know how to use ,but it looks neat hanging on the nail in my shop. It keeps a bunch of saw dust off the floor.
Jerry
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1489)    An optical tool for comparing two images or objects, or     for viewing in 3D.
    I would think that it would be used with two ariel photographs,     taken some precise distance apart to provide the separation to     make 3D distance judging possible
    I don't see enough detail, but I suspect that the two pans can     be moved relative to each other, as well as rotated to align     some reference point in the two images. At that point, you can     visually judge height differences of anything showing up in both     photos -- and if you know the distance between the two photos,     can probably also measure the relative height of the features.
    The pen holder allows you to mark things found onto another     piece of paper.
    Hmm ... perhaps the depth perception would allow you to use it     to trace height contours onto the third piece of paper.
    Probably fairly old, as I believe that all of this is done by     computer these days.
1490)    A device to trap and drown mice. The lower container holds     water.
    The bait is held just at the edge of the platform, or perhaps     mounted on the platform, with a counterweight on the exterior     arm.
    The mouse climbs up the perforated tunnel, out onto the platform,     and at a certain point the platform tilts dumping the mouse into     the water. There is nothing for the mouse to grip, so it swims     until exhausted and then drowns.
    Was this commercial, or a home-built one?
1491)    Not really sure. Perhaps to plane a groove in a wooden     surface?
1492)    Plungers (pistons) from different sizes of hypodermic     syringes. The OD of the cylinders is ground to a precise fit     inside the matching syringe body, which contains the markings     for the amount of fluid injected or otherwise transferred. (I     use them for putting cutting fluids at the bottom of the groove     made when parting off metal in a lathe. It is difficult to     squirt it so that it runs down into the groove where it is     needed, but a dulled needle will put it right where you need it.
1493)    Looks like a hinge intended to be welded to two parts of a     project so the door can be lowered into place. (Of course, you     need two of them at least for most things.
1494)    Perhaps part of a coal fired hot air furnace? The pulley at the     bottom probably keeps the coals and ashes stirred as well as     perhaps powering something else.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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