What is it? Set 259

Page 1 of 2  
We need help from a Civil War expert for the first piece in this week's set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1467 Slide tray. Feeds slides into a slide projector.
1468 Ice delivery indicator. Put it in a window so the Ice man knows how much ice to schlep up to the upper floor for your icebox.
1470 Screw Jack (I'm not trying to be nasty to someone named Jack.) General purpose lifting jack from the era before hydraulics.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1465 Could it be a device for indicating wind direction by compass point? Perhaps used in gunnery?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1465: I gotta believe that this is a wind vane for directing artillery, or else for launching hot air balloons that they used for observation.
1466: baling pliers. The baling wire is grasped by the pliers, which are twisted around, tightening the wire. Then the pliers are opened and the wire is cut.
1467: Linear slide carousel for a slide projector.
1468: Ice thickness indicator for roads that cross frozen ponds in the winter. I'd hate to be the guy who has to retrieve the sign in the spring....
1469: The case and bone latch makes this Chinese, for sure. (The chopsticks help, too). I think its a pharmacology toolkit, for making medicines from bark, etc.
1470: http://www.lkgoodwin.com/more_info/screw_jacks/screw_jacks.shtml
-riverman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Pickaway/PickawayChapIII.htm
"Circleville Ice Company .--In 1862 J. H. Bennett established an ice business, of which his son, H. J. Bennett, took charge in 1870. The latter conducted it until three years ago, when the plant was purchased by a company and incorporated with a capital stock of $10,000. The first officers were : John L. Krimmel, president ; George Bennett, vice-president; Irvin F. Snyder, secretary; and W. C. Morris, treasurer. The present officers are: George Bennett, president; Milton Morris, vice-president; Irvin F. Snyder, secretary, and W. C. Morris, treasurer. The board of directors includes the four officers just named and Emanuel S. Neuding. In 1895 Mr. Bennett built new ice houses on the west side of the river, which were destroyed by fire the following year. He then purchased a tract of land on the Island road, where the present company's plant is now located. The buildings were again destroyed by fire in the summer of 1906. The company is now erecting large and better structures on the same site."
What I find really interesting is that they were bottling and selling mineral water in 1882! I thought that was a recent fad!
--riverman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the link, though I have to admit I was disappointed when I went to Google maps and found the Circleville wasn't laid out in a circle, then I went back and reread the page where it said that it "derives its name from the fact that the original town was laid out within a circular enclosure, formed by a high embankment, that was found here when the first settlement was made." I really expected a circular street with straight roads radiating out from it, seems like false advertising to me.;-)
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well,
1466 (a guess) wire bending pliers
1467 is easy enough... a slide tray for a slide projector.
1468 ???
1469 (a guess), some sort of Japanese tea set.
1470 a Jack stand. 1 1/4" is probably good for a ton or two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1-1/4" is good for 10 tons.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Right after I hit send (and had thought about it a little bit) I figured I had WAY understated that number.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1465: At a guess, it's an ranging compass and the freely-spinning arrow is to help the gunner allow for windage.
1468: it's an ice order card. You set it in your window with the number representing the amount of ice you wanted uppermost, and the iceman delivered accordingly. As it's photographed, he would deliver 20 pounds.
1469: Japanese or Korean eating kit for travel. The small skewer is for sticking small tidbits (like the toothpick in an hors d'ouever) The two- pronged thing is a fork. <http://research.calacademy.org/research/anthropology/utensil/portable.htm is Korean
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Barbara Bailey" wrote: (clip) 1469: Japanese or Korean eating kit for travel. The small skewer is for

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ The small spoon on the opposite end is suspiciously like those used for sniffing dope.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, that's a good link. I used it on the answer page since it's the closest I've seen to the set on my site.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1465 navigation tool for boats. I quess the navigator would get the piece lined up with magnetic north then set the arrow in the direction they needed to go. I would guess that the unit has a gimble? to keep it upright with the motion of the boat. 1466 looks like a tool to tighten wire or something. Maybe for banding stuff together. 1467 Floppy disc holder? 1468 no idea but I am sure I have seen this somewhere, My guess would be that it tells the user what the acceptable temperature is for a substance. 1469 pass???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oops missed 1470 but its a jack.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

1465 - Looks like a portable wind vane. May have been used for launching balloons or for weather monitoring.
1466 - Wire former
1467 - Slide tray. Used for film slides, the side notches are for use when they are stacked.
1468 - Ice order card. You hung it in the window to tell the ice monger how much you needed.
1469 - Japanese utensil kit. Used by a traveler when eating at the common tables in the Inn.
1470 - House jack. Used to jack up your house or barn to enable you to work on the stone foundations.
--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    Actually -- the notches (rack gear along the bottom of the ridge on the near side) engages a gear in the slide projector and was used to advance the tray precisely one slide position at a time.
    [ ... ]

    Stone -- and wood posts in warmer climates.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

Yep. they are also numbered so that you can read the slide numbers when stacked.

Warm climate? What's that? We have 12 degrees here.....

--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Actually -- those numbers on the top angle of the rack were either indicated by a pointer in the projector, or viewed through a window in the projector -- so you could slide the carrier along until a specific slide was in position to be loaded and projected. Stacked had nothing to do with it, since you don't care what number is where when there are multiple carriers stacked up -- only when there is a carrier in the projector, or when you have a carrier in your hand and wish to pull out a specific slide. There is typically a clear plastic dust cover which snaps over the carrier when it is not in the projector, and there is a label on which you can write a very short description of each slide by number to help you find the one you want.
    In later carousel trays there are similar index numbers around the skirt for quickly rotating the carousel to position a specific slide for projection.

    Where is "here"? And which temperature scale? C or F? I'm currently in Northern Virginia, and it is sort of hovering a bit over the freezing point.
    But the place which I was describing was deep South Texas. Close enough to the border so you start to experience the exponential spice rise as you approach the border (from either side). :-)
    There, the ability of a breeze to flow under the floor is beneficial most of the year. Up in North Dakota, it is something which you certainly don't want to happen. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

REAL Upstate NY (as opposed to the folks who think that 10 miles north of NYC is upstate) Fahrenheit scale, Oh and it has dropped just a bit, it's about 6 outside at this time.
--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1465)    The device is obviously designed to show the wind direction.     You set it down with the North-pointing needle pointing to the     'N' on the compass rose, and then the arrow will point into the     wind.
    It is obvious that there are provisions for adjusting the     balance of the arrow -- to minimize lateral forces on the     bearing, and to prevent a slight tilt of the base from affecting     the reading.
    I find myself wondering what might be revealed if the two thumb     nuts on either side of the compass were removed. Is there     something stored in the base?
    For initial thoughts (ignoring the two pistols which might or     might not not have been intended to be part of the setup) it     might have been for determining wind direction prior to taking a     long range target shot with a rifle. It would be more     beneficial if it included a way of measuring the strength of the     wind as well as the direction. Hmm ... part of a sniper's     equipment -- used with a good quality rifle?
    The pistol shown is a single-shot one, cap-and-ball style, and     it appears to be missing the hammer, which should have been on     the square shaft end visible in the side plate.
    It is also missing the ramrod, which would normally have been     stored under the barrel. However, the fitting at the end of the     barrel looks more like something to allow a support to be     attached for target shooting.
    Pity that a friend has such a slow net connection. She spent     several years in civil war re-enacting, and studied things very     deeply. Well ... next time she is up visiting. :-)
    If the two pistols are identical (within the manufacturing     capabilities of the period, and given the changes which come     with age), then I might consider them to be a set of dueling     pistols, and the wind direction gauge to be used to select an     orientation which does not favor either duelist.
    Is there a way to attach the cover to the base, so the handle on     the top will carry both?
1466)    Looks like a tool for bending wire as part of jewelry.
1467)    Very obvious -- a slide tray for a pre-carousel 35mm     slide projector, -- and obviously a Revere slide projector.
1468)    From the days when ice was delivered (and milk, and other     needs of the time). You hung it on the outside insulated ice     box with the selected number up to tell the delivery man how     much you needed this delivery, 20 pounds being a single large     cube of ice, and the others being longer pieces than plain cubes     -- or multiples of the cubes.
1469)    This looks like a cook's set for oriental cooking with a wok.     The two small containers would contain ingredients prepared to     go into the wok at the proper moment. The chopsticks for     serving, or perhaps controlling certain thing. The long-handled     spoon for keeping the parts of the meal moving so nothing is     burned and stuck to the wok. I'm not sure about the needle or     the strange fork, however.
1470)    A house jack. In some (warmer) parts of the country houses are     mounted on wooden posts clear of the ground to allow airflow     under the house. Occasionally, one of these will rot, and need     replacing, so a pair of these jacks go on ether side while the     post is dug out and replaced. The rotting is more likely to     happen along the outer row of posts, where the access is     greater, but it is possible to climb under the house and exit     the other side -- based on the house which I lived in in as a     kid in South Texas
    We had one of these stored under the sink in one of the     bathrooms.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.