What is it? Set 247

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A new set has been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1393 Planimeter. Tool to measure area on a drawing or plane surface.

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Rob H. wrote:

only one item this week
1397 - weights for beam scales (Fairbanks was a major scale manufacturer)
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1397 - The Fairbanks 50lb weight is for testing elevators. This one I'm sure of, as I remember seeing a truckjload of them once when they were doing an elevator inspection where I worked, saw them hauling them in & out.
The rest of them - "damfino"!
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Nahmie wrote: ...

Maybe the used them there, but that certainly isn't the only place. Those (and larger) are used in many industrial scales (truck scales being one of the most common, of course) and testing of same as well.
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Nahmie wrote:

The weights are used to calibrate scales. If you ever get to see the Inspector certify a scale for commercial use you will see them.
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On Mon, 01 Sep 2008 20:07:39 -0500, "David G. Nagel"

Hey guys,
Actually, the weights are just "weights". Many uses, from scale testing as mentioned, to (also as mentioned) in my own case for testing and setting elevators and their controls during both installation and authority inspection.
The local Toledo Scale place rented them out fairly regularly for uses above, and commonly to test fork-lifts, and I've even seen them used to snub "cat-heads" on roof tops.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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1394) Used to cut grass or some kind of agricultural plant??
1395) I have actually seen one of these, but I can not remember what it was for. I am guessing that it provides protection for a lantern of some kind.
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Rob H. wrote: ...
Whichever number the picture is, the balls are decorative balls from lightning rods.
Somebody else got the scale weights and the planimeter already.
The leg-mounted blade (assuming the lower edge is actually sharp) is a new one to me...I've no real idea what it was actually intended for.
The long fork is part of a hayrake (the part that travelled the rail in a barn).
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1395--A cup holder for a carriage. Some of you young whippersnappers may not realize that, in those days, accessories like this did not come standard.
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I've been looking at your site, and it's fascinating, but do you have some place that tells what the things are? Maybe I'm overlooking it.
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wrote:

You haven't overlooked it, answers for the current set will be posted tomorrow afternoon, all previous sets have a link to the answer page a little ways down from the last numbered photo in the set. I'll also post a link to the answers here in the newsgroups tomorrow. So far they've all been answered correctly except for number 1395.
Rob
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You might consider closing up some of that trailing white space. I got as far as the "submit photos..." line and thought that's all there was.
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wrote:

I forgot that the second type of weight has also not been answered yet, the first weight was correctly identified as most commonly used for calibrating scales, though they were also used for various other purposes.
Rob
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connected to the weight which is then placed on the ground. the horse is free to move, but when it feels the pull from the weight, it will move to reduce the tension in the strap. Only useful on well trained horses. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Yes, they are horse tethering weights.
Rob
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. So far they've all

1395: The correct name escapes me, but it does look like the cooper's tool that was used to contain a fire made inside a finished barrel.
John Martin
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1398 is a hay unloading device? I thought of that, but it seemed much too small. I have used several versions of a hay unloading device. They were all bigger and were thrust vertically into the hay.
I suppose if you were dealing with a small load and were unloading it from the side, you could use something like this. There are far better designs out there.
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wrote:

Actually Rob is very diabolical and he just does this to tease us...
No, not really. He posts the answers a couple days later.
Sorry, I just couldn't resist.
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    O.K. Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1393)    A planimiter. You place the cylindrical device with     the pin on top somewhere outside the border of a drawing,     set the drum reading to zero, and then trace the outline of a     significant part of the drawing with the pin on the arm with the     knurled grip above it.
    When you complete the circuit of the drawing you will have a     reading showing how many square inches are enclosed.
    The table above the hinge shows conversion factors for different     scales of drawings or maps.
    I have one made by Bowen & Co. Bethesda MD for the U.S.C.E.     The difference is that mine has the pivot point and the counter     slide along the beam leading to the tracing point, offering     scales from 4.0:1 up to 19.0:1 and with a vernier reading to 0.01     units.
    It also has a calibrator -- a brass disc with a cork bottom and     three tiny pin points sticking out of the cork, and an arm with     a dimple in which the tracing point rests halfway out the arm.     At the end of the arm is an index line, so you can be sure when     you have rotated it a full 360 degrees. Markings on the disc     show that with a scale factor of 4.0 you should read 20 square     inches.
    O.K. According to a site found by Google:
        http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/USCE
    USCE apparently referred to:
        United States Army Corps of Engineers (usually seen as         USACOE or COE)
1394)    Hmm ... not certain, but I suspect that it is for cutting brush     by stomping it down to give a little more clearance for whatever     you are trying to do in the brush.
1395)    Looks like a protector set up around young trees in city     sidewalks. It looks as though there is now way to open     it -- so it is either slipped over the tree when very young, or     riveted in place.
    It looks as though it once had feet which have been cut or torn     off.
1396)    Same on both bottom and top? This suggests that a line of some     form passes fully through each one. Given the size, I suspect     that they were decorative bulges on table lamps.
1397)    Obviously for weighing something quite heavy -- perhaps for     weighing vehicles? I expect something like a 20:1 ratio or     even a 100:1 ratio -- so that would allow the single 50 pound     weight to counterbalance somewhere between 1000 pounds and 5000     pounds.
    The 100:1 would require two lever sets to get sufficient     reduction with a short enough beam.
1398)    Strange beastie. My guess is that the device is lifted by     the rod nearest the chain once it has weight on the tines.
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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