What is it? Set 236

As I mention on the site, the answer page will probably be posted on Saturday or Sunday.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1326. Metric clock. Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

#1329 is a tax token.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1326.. is a taffrail log, used to measure speed and/or distance traveled on a boat/ship.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
#1328 coin counter
R.H. wrote:

--

Richard


Richard L. Rombold
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

#1330 is a Frequency Meter... but not the vibrating reed type. I don't actually know how the pointer-type electromechanical ones work!
Tim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
#1329 Sales Tax Token

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1326: a ship's log (counts off length of line to a float tossed into the water)
1328: a sounding apparatus? For maritime depth measurement, in conjunction with a weight and line. The cover looks noncorroding in ocean spray...
1329: some kind of tax token, only the historical archives of the state of Illinois can tell us how it was used.
1330: an AC voltmeter, probably to monitor generator output. Note the scale is very nonlinear near zero volts, it might use a copper oxide rectifier. 1940s or earlier. This has a mirrored scale, one lines up the needle with its reflection for accurate reading (to eliminate parallax).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

dont think so. this one should have a little spiral propeller at the end of a stout line that is dropped in the water. it spins and drives the instrument much like a car tacho I think.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, that's a screw log. I think they also called them "taffrail logs," but the original type of taffrail log (which I used to make out of Honduras mahogany in small quantities and sell to the wooden-boat crowd, back in the '70s) was just a flat board attached to a knotted line. The board had a peg in it that would pull out when you jerked the line, which allowed the board to plane its way back to the boat when you pulled the line.
Those original logs date back centuries. The screw logs came in sometime in the 19th century, I think.
-- Ed Huntress
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 10:47:43 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

the mechanism of operation is quite different. your mahogany log should have been pie slice shaped with a weighted edge. it would sit vertical in the water so that it's resistance kept it pretty well motionless and would pull a knotted line overboard. an elegantly simple piece of technology.
Stealth Pilot
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

1326: Well log
1329: Sales tax token from the days when sales taxes were less than 1%, so you needed something worth less than 1 cent. (Funny how the government never seems to do with less, isn't it).
1330: Old voltmeter
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.