What is it? Set 234

I'm going to be away from my computer all day tomorrow so the answers might be a little later than usual.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1314 is a tube caddy for a radio/TV repairman.
1319 is a book holder-opener for infirm/lazy readers
LLoyd
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As luck would have it, it'll probably take a little longer than usual to figure out what these could possibly be--at least if everybody else is as clueless as I am this time.
1313 - Although this initially looks like a butterfly valve, the details don't work out very well for that (no way to connect pipes, overly thick valve limiting flow in the open state, etc). The insignia in the middle, after some image manipulation and googling, would appear to be for the Dayton Fan & Motor Company, which suggests this may be a electrical control, presumably an early variable speed control (presumably acting by varying inductance or, more likely, magnetic coupling in a transformer).
1314 - Was this maybe for an engine mechanic, to carry spark plugs etc. about?
3415 - Self-heated device, with a built-in torch for the heating. What you'd do with a shallow heated cone or funnel I've no good idea. Maybe strip paint from curved surfaces like cornices or other architectural moldings...maybe not.
1316 - I think I actually know this, although I don't have the proper name handy. It's half of a pair of wedges used by printers to keep type in place. A key is used in the toothed portion to adjust the tension. Being a printer's thing, it must have a strange and slightly fanciful name other than "wedge" or "clamp."
1317 - Possibly a key for 1316, with the added advantage of having a hammer head to perform other gentle adjustments on the type or the press.
1318 - A device for rolling an edge in sheet metal to strengthen it or interlock two pieces (for e.g. roofing)?
1319 - Spring clip to keep the leaves of a book open to the proper spot, possibly for musicians. Anybody who has tried to play out of a (non-spiral-bound) hymn book would appreciate the utility of such a device.
Now to read other guesses.
--
Andrew Erickson

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wrote:

1316 Is a Hemple Quoin, indeed used for locking up type in a chase and, 1317 is the key which was used, the hammer end to the handle was to exert extra expansion (with the help of a hammer) when required. Ron (Printers Devil) Wood
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1318 and 1319 are beading machines. Steve

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wrote:

1313 looks like the variable inductors in the radios my great-grandfather built, probably in the teens and twenties of the last century.
An neighbor of his told me she could remember as a child waiting her turn in a queue of kids at my great-grandparent's door to listen to the only radio in Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia.
--
Ned Simmons

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Andrew Erickson is correct and the term was Hemple Quoin or Hempel Quoin, can't remember which spelling. "Quoins" were devices to "lock-up" the type in a "chase" or steel fram for inserting into a letterpress printing machine. Wooden quoins preceeded the hemple and were tightened with a "shooting stick" and later quoins were made up of four parts, a pair of wedges with a third wedge tightened with a "quion key", forcing the two wedges apart, subsequently "locking the job up" --- aaah, happy days.
Ron (Printers Devil) Wood
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1316: Printers' quoins. Used in pairs as wedges to lock up forms of letterpress type. I've got a box of them that my grandfather, who got his journeyman printer's card around 1905, labelled "coins". Some of this exact type, some of a fancier type with clips to hold them in pairs. Marked Hempl (by Hempel), Monarch, American Wood Type, F.X. Smith. All interchangeable.
The fancier ones are machined. They have a pawl which allows the quoins to expand only, unless the key is inserted.
1317: A quoin key. Works all types of quoins.
I'll occasionally use the quoins as packing pieces on milling or shaper setups, or in woodworking clamping situations. Not much travel, though.
John Martin
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<snip> 1317: A quoin key. Works all types of quoins. <snip>
Only Hempl, Hemple or Hempel :-) type coins or quions.
Square ended keys were used for Cornerstone Quoins.
Ron
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Sorry, Ron. What I meant to say was that the one key works both of the quoin types that I have - all of the Hempl-type quoins, by whatever manufacturer, plus the Ajax quoins. The Ajax quoins are the ones with the spring loaded pawl and ratchet that allow the quoins only to expand unless the key is in place. They don't come apart, as do the Hempls.
John Martin
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wrote:

1316: Printers' quoins. Used in pairs as wedges to lock up forms of letterpress type. I've got a box of them that my grandfather, who got his journeyman printer's card around 1905, labelled "coins". Some of this exact type, some of a fancier type with clips to hold them in pairs. Marked Hempl (by Hempel), Monarch, American Wood Type, F.X. Smith. All interchangeable.
The fancier ones are machined. They have a pawl which allows the quoins to expand only, unless the key is inserted.
1317: A quoin key. Works all types of quoins.
I'll occasionally use the quoins as packing pieces on milling or shaper setups, or in woodworking clamping situations. Not much travel, though.
John Martin
They were wedged quite tight prior to expansion so that usually they expanded not much more than 12pt (12/72") or so.
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#1313 is a variable coil, probably used for tuning a radio set. Pre-1950 lots of radios used tuned RF, and a single variable coil is good for that. More modern radios needed to tune more than one circuit at a time (RF and local oscillator) so would have several such variable elements geared to move together.
#1318: sheet metal seaming tool?
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Yeah, it's a multi-tool of some sort. But that cross screwdriver isn't a Philips.
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1313) Continuously variable inductance - those were good days... 1314) Make-up artists' box 1315) Looks like some kind of lamp - not sure... 1316) Even with multiple answers already posted I haven't a clue what it is supposed to do 1317) Key/screwdriver combined with a hammer 1318) A very slow spaghetti maker...No, seriously is this used to draw a wire? 1319) Does the round thingy with the handle flap into the cut-out (the small notch seems to match the projection off the handle). Even then...Lord knows!
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Michael Koblic,
Campbell River, BC
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1313 Variometer. The word has two meanings. One is some aircraft instrument. The one that applies to this thing refers to a variable inductor with a fixed coil and and internal coil that can rotate around an axis perependicular to the axis of the fixed coil. Old radio tuning component.

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