What is it? Set 136

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Rob
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794. Some sort of recording phonograph. I'm guessing a form of dictaphone. 796. phone jack. Karl
R.H. wrote:

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793. A scraper of some kind. Offset handle for working at floor level methinks. 794. A dictaphone, or other type of recorder. 795. ??? 796. RJ-11 modular connector
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793. A scraper of some kind. Offset handle for working at floor level methinks. 794. A dictaphone, or other type of recorder. 795. ??? 796. RJ-11 modular connector
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794 would be a Dictaphone.
796 would be a RJ11 plug (sixoneeight) = 618
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793. I'm guessing it's used to get the accurate and uniform spacing for putting up wood siding/clapboard.
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#793 Stanley Clapboard Gauge. Used to space clapboards. #794 Edison voicewriter. Just saw one on mythbusters yesterday. 30's dictaphone. #795 A latch of some type? #796 RJ11 jack
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A guess for 795. You put it into something, turn the screw to push the lugs out, and then pull it to remove the thing you've pushed it into from some other thing into which it fits snuggly.
Hmm, having written that it's not much of a guess.
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797: Barrel wrench for opening the several different bung's and lids. 798: A pipe knife for your smoking pleasure. Puff

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794: For recording old audio cylinders? Early dictaphone?
796: RJ11 phone jack (male)
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

Actually, the "RJ" numbers are wiring patterns for specific applications, not the connectors. They are named *p*c, for the number of postions and the number of conductors.

That is the 4P4C wired as a four conductor handset cord. The one in picture 796 is the 4P4C, as used for handsets.
<http://www.levitonvoicedata.com/learning/wiring.aspx is a link to some common RJ numbers.
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    Hmm ... the phone company (the originator of these, IIRC) uses RJ-48 for both of the wiring patterns on the identical connector for a feed from a T1 box on the side of the house to the DSU in the house. The only difference is the suffix which indicates the differing wiring pattern for the transmit and receive pairs. The one which I am using is RJ-48C. I forget what the other one was.
    However -- the 8-pin connector involved is usually referred to as a RJ-45

    I don't believe so. The one shown has the fatter side walls, producing a connector the same width as the 6-pin version. You can see the grooves which would accept the extra blades (and in this case, simply prevent damage to the wire pins in a 6-conductor jack).
    The 4-pin used in the handsets (at least in the old ITT one in my hand at the moment) is narrower, and does not have the unused grooves outside the four in actual use.

    But -- it does not show the RJ-13, and a Google search for that seems to be confused by someone who has been posting under the name "rj13".
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I'll bet you have a lot of DB9 connectors, too.
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    [ ... ]

    Nope. DB-25 yes, and 13W3 in the same shell, but the 9-pin ones which I have are DE-9 connectors.
    I note that you do not respond to my comment about the difference between the handset connector and the more common one used for phone lines.
    The data sheet for the crimp dies on my AMP crimper include (among others):
    Part #        Ident    Description             Dot =======================================    853400-3    Green    4 POSN HANDSET     853400-8    Blue    4-5 POSN LINE
    Which shows a different die set needed for the narrower connector used on the handset. (I don't have that particular die set, though I have the one for the 4-6 position one, and the 8-position one.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

The connector on handset cord on my phone looks just like the one in the photo. ITT didn't always do thing the W-E way, when it didn't have to meet a standard. I serviced the old 1A key phone systems for years, and it was amazing just how cheap some of the brands were made, but they all plugged into the same KTU, and the cards were interchangeable.

Just checking! ;-) Most people think all "sub D" shells are 'DB" series, including a lot of computer cable and connector vendors. The originals Sub-D connectors were made by Cinch. Also, the SVGA monitor plug is a "HDE-15" sub D connector. I have about 500 different types of connectors on hand for repairs, including some that haven't been made in over 60 years. (A four pin tube socket for the very early "Breadboard" radios)

See above.

I got a new Jameco catalog in the mail today with the amp modular plugs on page 115. they also have their ValuePro line with the 4P4C connectors, but the picture stinks. They have the rather rare 10P10C connector as well. If you look at the top right section of the page you will see that there are two widths of 4P4C modular jacks available. Since the handset doesn't connect to the telco, it doesn't need an Registered Jack number. I can scan the wider plug for you, but not tonight. I do my graphics work on another computer that's in the house, and I'm working in one of my shops tonight.
http://www.jameco.com/Jameco/catalogs/c264/P115.pdf
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    [ ... ]

    The only genuine WE handset which I have nearby has the captive cord instead of the modular connector cord, so I can't check there. But IIRC, *all* handset cords have used that narrower connector.
    It is a bit too late tonight, but I could photograph them both side by side.

    Also -- *any* size of the "Miniature Blue Ribbon" connectors by Amphenol is now called "Centronics", simply because Centronics (the printer manufacturer) selected that connector for the parallel interface which they used. I find myself greatly frustrated by the use of the term for the 50-pin connectors used for SCSI on many systems. (For the 50-pin, I prefer the locking connector made mostly by AMP and used on the Suns before they went to fast wide SCSI with 68-pin connectors replacing the 50-pin ones.

    Though Cannon was another common manufacturer of those. Each had different designs of backshells -- some much worse than others.

    The ones with two pins fatter than the other two, so filament fed through two, and the other two were grid and plate -- and the filament served as the cathode as well? Or the ones where grid and plate were separate connections through the walls of the tube?

    Yes -- you have covered it there.

    So it does.

    I would like to get a crimper for those. I have an sBus card for older Sun workstations which provides four serial ports through such connectors -- though I really don't need the outer two pins -- they are for carrying the signals for synchronous serial and asynchronous is all that I need.

    Actually -- the top of that page shows two four-pin connectors, but only one is a 4P4C. The other is marked as 6P4C. The 4P4C is labeled with the descriptive word "handset", while the 6P4C is one of two marked "RJ11". All three have WE numbers -- an Western Electric is good enough to be Phone Company -- at least back in the old days. :-)

    Hmm ... I'll have to look at what DD form I got when I retired as a civilian employee of the Army.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I use one of my flatbed scanners for small parts. Lay them on the glass and cover it with a folded white tee shirt. Some samples are on this page of my personal website: <http://home.earthlink.net/~mike.terrell/Ephar.html

Some people also call the 24 pin version used for IEEE-488 (HPIB, GPIB) "Centronics" as well. BTW, Google SCSI as "Small System Serial Interface" and see how many idiots there are out there. ;-)

Personally, I prefer the AMP one piece shell that folds over and has a single screw to hold it together. I think I saw a couple hundred DB 25 hoods the other day at the local surplus metal dealer. I'll take a notebook the next time to write down the AMP number.

Yes, it is black bakelite with a pair of "F"s , a "G" and a "P" molded in. It is made to be screwed to a board, and top wired.

How hard would it be for you to machine the outer edges from one of the 8P8C dies to make it wide enough? If you don't need the wires, you don't have to worry about crimping those positions. Personally, I would make my own dies for my 1 ton arbor press. I have severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, so some hand tools are out of the question most days. I used custom dies with a 1/2 ton arbor press for crimping ribbon cable into IDC sub-D connectors, and IC headers at Microdyne. We had 25 people who made cables for production, but I preferred to make my own for test fixtures, rather than spend a half hour explaining what i needed. A quick and dirty guide for the pin side of the IC header connectors can me made from a stack of three or four layers of phenolic or glass epoxy perf board drilled in a .1" * .1" grid instead of drilling a metal plate. A couple screws from the bottom of a scrap piece of 1'8" aluminum plate allows you to replace the perf board when it wears out. It has the advantage of fitting every version made with .1" spacing, and will last for 500 to 1000 crimps if you don't abuse it.

That is the left column labeled "Modular Plugs". The first two items in the right hand column are the two different 4P4C jacks, and the widths are .48" and .395". If you look, you will see that the narrower version is more expensive, which suggests that it doesn't sell as well.

My sig file is there to remind a net stalker in Oregon that he hasn't stopped my non profit work to collect, refurbish and give free working computers to other low income & disabled Veterans in my area. The DD2114 is your honorable discharge.
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    My flatbed scanner is hooked to the token Windows box, and is a pain to use (limited physical access among other things), and I don't think that I even *have* a plain white tee shirt. (They don't have pockets, and I use shirt pockets regularly. :-)

    Yep! I wonder where some of these things come from.

    The AMP ones also have a second screw (a long slotted setscrew), in a square nut which drives the tapered Delrin block which serves as the cable clamp. IIRC, some of the earlier ones had three screws, instead of just one.

    Interesting. *Those* I don't have -- though I have some octal ones which were used mostly for relay sockets in industrial controllers.
    Do you have any "loctal" sockets around still?

    IIRC, the overall width of the connector is the same. They have simply taken some of the thick walls of the 8-pin version and added another pair of slots for the blades -- and of course the internal guide grooves for the wires under the blades.
    They don't bother documenting the width for either those or the 8-pin connectors in that catalog page.
    Certainly if the connector is wider, I won't have room to widen the dies for my AMP crimper for the modular plugs -- and AMP/Tycho does not sell dies for that crimper. But perhaps I could work with one of the cheaper "pliers" crimpers for that purpose.

    Then you would probably like my crimpers for 8 ga through 4/0 terminal lugs. It is a hydraulic head, with the choice of a hand-pump, a foot pump (which I don't have), or an electrically-cycled pump. I'm set for all of them except 4/0. I don't have those dies. There are two heads -- one for 8 Ga through 2 Ga, and the other for 0 (1/0) through 4/0. I got the electrical pump first -- as part of a surplus sale when I was after something else -- but once I saw it I realized what it was and kept it.
    For the smaller range (8 Ga through 2 Ga) there are other self-contained hand-held and hand-pumped hydraulic crimpers -- but for the 1/0 through 4/0, the head is always separate. I first *used* one of those when I worked for Melpar back in the mid 1960s, and they had the foot-pumped version at that time. This is why I recognized the electrical pump when I got it. :-0

    Somewhere I still have a crimper made from a smaller arbor press than the 1/2 ton one -- dies and guides which were semi-affordable. I now have a really nice press by T&B Ansley which came from a hamfest. Thank goodness I had a folding wheeled cart to carry it back to the car. :-)

    Yes -- but we were talking about the plugs, not the jacks.
    In the plugs section, only the narrower one is called a "4P4C". The wider one is called a "6P4C", and is given a WE part number of "623", while the "4P4C" is given a WE part number of "616". Of course, the "6P6C" is also given the WE part number of "623".
    it seems that there is a bit of confusion between the terminology of the plugs and the jacks. Measuring the width of my example of a "4P4C", I come out with 0.298" (Probably 0.300" was the target dimension.)
    Note also that there are some other specialized ones which I don't see here. There is a 6P6C which has the locking clip offset to one side which is used as a serial port on DEC VT-320 terminals -- and I think the VT-220 as well.
    Amp makes a set of dies for my crimper to handle those too.

    [ ... ]

    O.K. Though you seem to have either dropped a digit in the .sig, or added one i the sentence above. (I suspect the latter, as most DD forms which I encountered were three digit -- especially ones as common as those.
    [ ... ]

    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

I was using a DE size hood with a single screw, no cable clamp. I've seen, and may have some of the others. The hood for the three row, 50 pin connector has three screws in some versions.

I have one used one, and two that were never crimped into the mounting flange left.

I've found deals like that too. ;-)

Why make life harder than you have to? Using those heavy hand crimpers will cause lots of wear and tear you don't want to face later in life.

I used to take a hand truck and my full sized Chevy stepvan to hamfests. I pick up a pair of brand new enclosed relay racks one year for about $30 each at the end of the hamfest. I asked him what the rent for another day was going to be on the U-haul trailer, then offered to pay the difference. I was shocked when I found the wholesale was over $1000 each. :)

I realize that, but I wanted to point out that there are at least two widths.

Those are newer than the DEC terminals I've worked on. I still have about 50 terminals to give away, or scrap. Most are color, and were working when I put them into storage.

Yes, there is an extra "1" and it got through the spell checker.
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    Which one? The DB series with the high density 50 pin, or the DD series with the normal density 50 pin? I've used both, and I still have both -- though I use the DD-50 more often for older Sun SCSI boxes.

    O.K. AFIK, I don't have any left, so I was just wondering. :-)
    [ ... ]

    Well ... I have to shove the contact blades in so they don't hang up on the wires, even if I am not making connections with them. And the 4 serial-port card warns against using the 8-pin plugs in the jacks, saying that it *will* mangle the pins in the female.

    And the start of a collection. :-)

    It is *already* later in life. At least, for me, I have been forced onto Medicare, instead of my preferred insurance.
    As for why the hand-pumped crimpers?
1)    The first one came with the first die in the smaller range (8 ga -     2 ga). Something like $5.00 at a hamfest.
2)    Some of the others came from eBay later -- and were bought to     get the dies which they came with -- building up an almost     complete set of those.
3)    Only *after* I got those did I get a separate head (also from     eBay) which I could connect to the electric pump.
4)    And *finally*, I got the head for the larger size -- 1-0     through 4-0. That one came with an air-over-hydraulic pump     which went to a friend, since I already had the electric one.

    I've gotten cabinet racks from hamfests too -- though not two at a single hamfest. Good ones are expensive new -- though I've never bought one for *home* new -- though for our computer center at work, I was in the position of selecting racks from time to time.

    O.K. and only the jacks documented that. And it was the two widths which started this exchange. :-) And the one in the puzzle photo was certainly the wider of the two. You can see the grooves which would accept the other contact blades if they were fitted, and would at least guide the contact wires in the female.

    O.K. I have a couple -- one 220 and one 320 -- which I use as consoles on some of my servers which don't need a heavy and power-hungry monitor for their function. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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