What is it? CXCV

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Set 195 has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Please don't send any email to the account that I use to post here on the newsgroups, for some reason it doesn't receive any incoming mail, instead use the gmail account on my profile on the web site.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

> 1177 are blacksmiths' heading tools for holding bolts while forming the head.
1178 here it would be an eel trap, in the US a snake trap?
Tom
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1076: shaft balance weight
-- Ed Huntress
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1074 Smudge Pot

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I wondered about that, but what would it be for? Smudge pots for protecting fruit crops were introduced in the US in 1913. What would they have been used for previously?
-- Ed Huntress
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Other than the crop protection purpose, and before the concept of clean air was grasped, small smudge pots were used as highway hazard lights. Once upon a time, it was common to see a number of smoking, flickering smudge pots set in the road around construction sites and road repair sites. The point was that they would burn all night. Nowadays, the equivalent is the flashing strobes that get put on temporary highway barriers. Police also sometimes used them instead of flares around accidents. They were also too cheap and dirty to steal.

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Aha. I wonder why they were called "smudge" pots, then.
Oh, well. Sometimes a question isn't worth asking. <g>
Thanks, though, for the info.
-- Ed Huntresss
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Well, sure. Maybe I should have wondered how the onces used for protecting fruit trees were called smudge pots. Maybe the name was already in circulation.

I think you have to be up at 4:00 in the morning. I was loading up for an hour of snapper fishing, and turned on my computer so I could see the highlights of last night's Yankees - Red Sox game.

Thanks for the story, Rich.
-- Ed Huntress
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I'm 55 and I had the same imagery when I was a kid. I had forgotten about those round ones until the discussion about the two-armed weirdo, 1074. I wonder when the local streets department stopped using them?
--
Go to http://MarcDashevsky.com to send me e-mail.

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to it. )-;

Those round black bombs were "Toledo Torch" brand. I had a set of six for a while, but they escaped, and are on the loose somewhere in central Florida now.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Unfortunately, lots of strange things are loose in Central Florida. I sold about 100 of the large version from a closed nursery at Renninger's Flea market in Mt Dora about 12 years ago. The antique freaks were buying them by the dozen, to use for decorations.
--
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I have a ball shaped brass covered Smudge pot like the ones on the high ways many years ago. It's relatively new as I purchased it new at a Fireplace store. I burn that Citronella oil in it to keep mosquitoes away.
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On Thu, 30 Aug 2007 11:20:56 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

There's a secondary definition of "smudge" as a noun that is "a smoky fire". Now it's most often used in connection with protecting fruit plantaions from frost, but you'll also find it in woodscraft and outdoorsmanship guides to refer to a fire designed to throw smoke, rather than burn cleanly, either to keep away insects or as a signal.

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Aha. Thanks, Barbara. I think we have several of those smudge pots here on rec.crafts.metalworking. They're definitely designed to blow smoke.
-- Ed Huntress
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

Groves in Florida spray a fine mist that freezes on the fruit, then harvest and process it as fast as they can, so it doesn't thaw and go bad. I used to live in Lake county, and you KNEW when it dropped to 34 degrees during the night, when all those diesel pumps were fired up.
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They do that now - and since the late 70's - because EPA made them stop "firing" the groves.
I had a grove pot for many years that I used to cleanly dispose of used motor oil. If it's tuned correctly, it will burn anything you can vaporize below about 400F, and can be made to burn with a clean blue flame. The grove people used to deliberately make them run rich and smoke, in the belief that the smoke "would hold the heat in".
I grew up in Florida in the 50's and 60's. It was common for school-aged boys to hire out to fuel and re-fuel the pots in the wee hours.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

My first visit was in '66. I moved here about 21 years later, onto 5 acres of a frozen out 25 acre orange grove.
<http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q7126+terrell+lane,+leesburg+florida&sll (.891483,-81.77006&sspn=0.006791,0.009978&layer=c&ie=UTF8&ll(.891623,-81.770049&spn=0.006791,0.009978&t=h&z&iwlocdr&om=1&cbll(.890308,-81.767153> Just to the right of the pool is where the house was. I now live north of Lake county.
--
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

By way of making a smudge when the mosquitos got bad my Dad used to pull the air filter and squirt some oil into the air intake on his lawn tractor. Seemed to work and looked cool as Hell (at least to a 6 year old). Probably wreck the emission control system these days.
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Ed Huntress wrote:

Out of curiousity, where did you find the information on 1913 for orchard/vineyard/etc. use? A particular style/brand/type maybe, would seem late for the concept anyway???
(I haven't looked at the posted pic's, w/ dialup the load time is so long as to rarely try...)
--
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After seeing the smudge pot answer, and vaguely remembering that smudge pots for protecting trees was something that started in California in the early part of the last century, I Googled it. I found two or three articles that described it as something that started with a big freeze out there, in 1913.
As for how I "vaguely remembered" it, that was from a paper I wrote in 9th grade, when I lived in Florida. Some things stick in one's memory. 'Too bad the important things don't.
-- Ed Huntress
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