What is it? CLXXVI

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    O.K. I'll go into the answers a bit sooner today -- but posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as usual.
1019)    Not really sure -- but they sort of look like adjustable     length legs for something like a transit or other surveying     instrument.
    But the slots look strange. If the ends slide in fairly easily,     they might be for a retaining string or wire threaded through     the slots on both ends to hold the end-caps in place. You would     screw the outer cap down on the wire or string going through the     slot on each end.
    Perhaps it could even be a form for winding insulated wire to     form an electromagnet -- as the material (brass or bronze) would     not interfere with that.
1020)    A noontime salute. The magnifying glass on the sundial will     focus the sun on a small pile of gunpowder, or a fuse in the     salute cannon, thus automatically firing the cannon (at least on     sunshiny days). Presumably, if the sun is not out, whatever it     is an activity signal for is not desirable. :-)
1021)    For filing the teeth in a saw blade -- probably a carpenter's     ripsaw or crosscut saw since there is no clearance for a     stiffening back rib for a miter saw.
    The black object hanging on the hook is either a tooth offset     gauge, or a tool to set the offset.
1022)    Looks like a wedge for splitting logs, with perhaps the square     hole serving to allow prying it out when it gets stuck.
    Or -- it is for cutting square tennions on the ends of something     (perhaps wagon wheel spokes), and the square hole is a gauge.     But the sharpening of the edge does not look good enough for     that use. (Perhaps it has suffered over the years.
    The handle does not have the bulge near the handgrip end to keep     it from slipping out when swung, so I presume that it was to be     held in place and struck on the back rather than swung.
1023)    Looks like a device to wind up a narrow strap or a string t     bind something together. Pull out on the "crown" to disengage     the ratchet to release it. The hooks either hold a loop of the     string, or spike into the material of the strap (or perhaps     engage a hole in a leather belts.
    Hmm ... an adjustable buckle for a leather belt on a person?
1024)    A high-current shunt for an ammeter. The current to be     measured is fed through the large binding posts, and the voltage     developed across the shunt is fed to the smaller binding posts     through the fine wires attached near the ends of the long folded     resistance element.
    At a guess, I would say that it is for a minimum of 50 Amps     (with a fairly sensitive meter) up to perhaps 200 Amps (with a     less sensitive meter movement). Of course, the material of the     resistance element could affect that, with silver being for     higher currents or more sensitive meter movements.          Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
    
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snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

It could be the 'Come in out of the hot sun before you get burned' warning. Not really required on rainy days!
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1021: saw sharpening jig; the acute angle is about right for logger's 'misery whip" saws used on green wood
1022: firemans's axe sounds right. Don't know why the end of the handle has a wedge, though.
1023: given the date, I'm guessing a corset cinch.
1024: four-terminal resistor, used probably as a current meter shunt
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-Carl
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1019- relinkable fuses 1020-range or elevation finder?? 1021- sharpener of some kind 1022-???? 1023-???? 1024- heating element of some kind??

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    I don't think so. If the cylinders were an insulating material, I might accept your suggestion, but with a conductive (brass or bronze) cylinder between two conductive ends -- that pretty much shorts out any fuse function. :-)
    As for the rest (already snipped) there have been good answers to these which contradict your suggestions/guesses, except that 1021 *is* a sharpener (for saw blades).

As for 1024 -- it may heat somewhat in use, but that is not its intended function. It, too, has already been officially answered.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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noon cannon, no drinks served before it goes boom!
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Go no-go testing tools.
Original bench-rest shooting weapon.
Saw sharpening fixture.
See-through hatchet.
Patent belt buckle.
Shunt.
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I'd think a multi-purpose tool like that would be a field or lineman's tool rather than a central-office tool.
This site indicates it's a lineman's hatchet: http://www.mjdtools.com/tools/list_978/113856.htm
But they don't know what the hatchet blade is for either.
One person on this forum claims the blade was used for blazing the poles (to mark them for replacement)
http://www.line-man.com/forums/index.php?s f9bb2cdcf8234639217b844bfd7930&showtopicy84&pidx239&mode=threaded&start=#entry78239
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