What is it? CLXVII

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Set 167 has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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| Set 167 has just been posted: | | http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com / | | | Rob | |
966-- looks like a flat belt stretcher for splicing the two ends.
967--a chalk line marking tool
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967 looks like a cable running gizmo similar to the Cable Caster you can find in your local HD/Lowes store. You shoot the line across a space you want to run a wire, tie the wire off at the other end, then reel it back.
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| Set 167 has just been posted: | | http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com / | | | Rob | |
970a-e -- they're all parts of a computer keyboard
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969 Nipper/Come-Along (see http://handcuffs.org/gallery_nippers/index.html for pictures of more) 970 Computer Keyboard (I know this because my old keyboard broke and I had it in pieces and saw exactly what is in those pictures when I took it to bits :)
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    So -- the main question is whether you got it back together working? :-)
    I have a couple of times now -- evicting all of the cat hair from the various parts of the keyboard. Even taking some parts down to the shop and blowing them off with compressed air. And the cat wonders why I lift the keyboard to a shelf when she demands to take over my lap. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

it to the PC broke). Plus, it was full of gunk and in need of replacement anyway :) So no, I didnt fix it, I replaced it with a nice new one :)
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I've not tried one for a while. I feel pretty dumb when I don't have a good guess or know at least one.
965. A lap anvil?
966. Upholstery web tensioner/stretcher
967. This has to be the origination of the term Pisto Grip drill.
968. I really wanted this thing to be some type of flute, but it sure looks like a lens in that one end.
969. I think I've seen the top tool used for whipping rope, a bit like a fid.
970. I think these are all different shots of a computer keyboard in different levels of undress.
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wrote:

970a would be the only one I know, it sit at my finger tips and relays this answer as I type. Sure as QWERTY is the standard.
Mark
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967 - If I'm not mistaken, that is a hand cranked drill that was manufactured by a company started by Bill Ruger, of Sturm, Ruger &Co. fame. I seem to recall that he tried manufacturing tools before partnering with Sturm to make guns. Note the similarity to the grip/ receiver parts well known Ruger .22 semi-auto.
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970- computer keyboard
Dave
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968 is a pointer for slide shows ... The lens usually focuses an image of an arrow and the power cord on the other end plugs into the mains. in the middle is the on/off button.
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    As always, posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
965)    An anvil for use in the lap. The vertical bar of the     'T' goes between the legs and is gripped by them. The     horizontal bars rest the weight on the legs, and the circular     flat area is where the work is placed.
966)    I don't want this used on *me*. :-)
    At a pure guess, it is for some earlier (and tougher) stages of     carding wool.
967)    An interesting variant on the eggbeater drill. The crank on     the top turns the drill chuck at the "muzzle". Probably from     the late 1930s or the early 1940s at a guess (no knowledge basis     for this guess -- just purely a guess. :-)
968)    A pre laser diode version of the "laser ponter". The white     button under the thumb turns on the lamp in the central bulge     and the lens at the front focuses the spot (or more likely an     arrow image) on the screen. Obviously, it needs to be plugged     in, instead of just running from batteries. The photo     certainly minimizes the power cord. :-)
969)    Look like some form of a "come along" for controlling animals     at a guess.
970)    This one is quite clear to me. It is a computer keyboard.
    Missing the keycaps.
    970a)    The guides for the key bodies which press on the         white silicone rubber "springs" barely visible inside         the chimneys.
    970b)    The flexible circuit boards and divider insulator which         make up the switching circuits. Note that where there         are circular pads, there are also circular areas around         them which appear more transparent. There are actually         two pads -- one on the upper board, one on the lower         board, and there is an insulator board which has         circular cutouts to allow the two circles to touch (and         make contact) when the upper board is flexed by the         keys. But -- it prevents the crossing wiring from         touching.
    970c)    A part of the logic card, with a green LED, and a         connector to go to the cable to the computer, a couple         of resistors, three capacitors (two styles), and a         moulded plastic pin which holds the board in position         when the keyboard is fully assembled.
    970d)    The silicone rubber "springs" which are pressed down         by the keys. This one has all of them as part of a         single moulded sheet. Some have individual rubber         springs which have to all be placed by hand prior to the         next stage of assembly. They look like "falsies" for         Barbie dolls. :-)
    970e)    This looks like the body which slides down the guides         under finger pressure to push on the springs.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.     
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I KNOW one, I KNOW one!! (I'm so excited!!!)
Number 966 is an upholsterer's webbing stretcher for chair bottoms, and the like. I know that one because I recently had to reupholster some chairs, and I bought one just like it.
Number 970b is an electronic circuit board of some kind, but I don't know what kind, even with the help of the other 970 series of pictures. (I design VLSI chips that have the same kind of wiring (only at a much smaller scale) for a living.)
-Don
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There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

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965: Perhaps for bending and hammering metal
966: World's least practical carpet stretcher
967: Hand drill
968: Slide viewer. Or possibly kaleidoscope with its own light
969: Cart puller
970: Keyboard.
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There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
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"Matthew T. Russotto" wrote: There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can result in a fully-depreciated one. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Over what period would you depreciate a lunch--maybe 3 hours? OTOH, if you buy a lunch for a client, and he remains your customer for years, I guess, technically, you would have to depreciate it over that period ;-).
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The odd thought which resulted in that signature was about leftovers -- the meal would be "fully depreciated" over the course of the meal, and any leftovers would have zero residual value.
Any resemblance to GAAP is purely coincidental, of course -- and if such resemblance exists, quite frightening.
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970: upholstery strap stretching tool (fit the strap on one end to the frame, drape over other end of the frame and impale on the points, while levering against the frame with the rubber-bumper edge of the tool). Just this afternoon, I watched Norm Abrams do the same task with a vise-grip...
968: pre-laser-pen light pointer. Not something I'll miss. (just another cord for a lecturer to trip over)
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They've all been answered correctly this week, back to the usual Thursday for the next set. Finally got the answer page finished:
http://pzphotosan174-t6.blogspot.com /
Rob
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Rob,
I own climbing hooks. I use them.
The 1008 picture does not look like any climbing hooks I've ever seen and I do not see any way in which they could possibly work for climbing.
Do you have any further information?
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