What is it? CLXV

This week's set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Apr 2007 04:11:34 -0400, R.H. wrote:

Hi Rob
953. Looks like Camera booths for a tv camera and operator for recording around Horse race tracks
954. Looks like a Vandergraph static generator.
--
I know that i will never be politically correct.
I don't give a damn about my lack of etiquette.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob I emailed the Royal Society of Arts to see if if there was a gold medal when the plow plane got a silver medal. They replied explaining how medals were given out. I'll email it to you if you email me with your address. I don't have permission to publish it so I can't put it up here. I could ask for permission for you to put it on your website if you would like to.
954. Electrostatic generator and leyden jar to store charge. 955. Guessing. Jar lifter for canning. If correct it's shown upside down. 958. Guessing a broad axe. If the blade's on one side. Blade edge isn't normaly concave Though. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_axe Karl

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

950 might be a tool for stripping bark off of very large logs, or for carving telephone poles from trees.
--riverman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

955 is for carrying something. My guess would be logs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

952. Looks like it could be a control lever for the top of a valve to set it to a particular output. Fluid pumping, steam pressure etc.
954. A cylinder electrical generating machine. The glass cylinder rubs against a pad, probably leather or felt, just visible at the left of the picture, as it rotates which charges it with static electricity. This is collected through the spikes and stored in the Leyden jar on the right.
956. Carpentry tool maybe. Pincer, screwriver and perhaps the 'corkscrew' is for starting screw threads in wood.
958. Looks like a brush axe of some sort.
--
The internet. It's not a big truck.
It's a series of tubes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As others have pointed out, 954 is an electrostatic generator. It must be an early Edison model, since it uses a cylinder--most of them used flat disks. TIC!
957 looks like car badges to be mounted on license plates. However, the Bugatti oval one is identical to the one I used to have on the back of my Bug-atti (VW, get it?) Stamped out of tin-plate like material, so I suspect it came from a cereal box.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Clay pigeon throwing stations. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as usual.
952)    For something which requires setting in percentage of full     circle. It locks in 5% increments. You have to pull the handle     away from the circle to free it to turn, then let it back so the     ring in the handle goes around one of the raised numbers.
    Through gearing it could be used to control some form of valve,     perhaps a steam valve to a steam engine. Or it could set a     centrifugal speed limiter.      953)    Hmm ... the color scheme is about the same as those other     firefighter training buildings, so I will guess that these are     to use training rescuing someone from a window high on the side     of a building -- again perhaps with provisions for introduction     of smoke.
954)    An electrostatic generator. The glass drum (with the dry     sand inside is turned to generate an electrostatic charge, which     migrates to the exterior of the drum.
    The charge then jumps the gap to the pointed collectors, which     are connected to a Leyden jar (early primitive, but high-voltage     capacitor), to wait for someone to reach towards it to draw off     the charge.
955)    It looks sort of like the gripper which goes on top of a long     pole which grocers used to use to reach things on high shelves.
    However -- those typically had rubber grips, not the rather     narrow ones provided by these blades. Perhaps they are intended     to close into the gap between a wide lid (for a preserves jar,     perhaps) and the jar itself. Given the dimensions, it must be a     pretty large jar -- so I would *hope* that it is lightly loaded.
    Anyway -- a skinny rod is used to connect the handle shown to     another down near the operator's end of the pole for ease of     use.
956)    Hmm ... early dental tool? Or surgeon's tool?
    Or perhaps for work on a horse's hoof?
957)    Hmm ... not the actual maker's badges, which would have been     fired glass enamel in a sort of cloisonne type construction, so     perhaps intended to go on a tapestry on the wall to show what     car you really *want* to own?
    The second set look about the right size to be what was offered     in cereal boxes about that period -- to be used on kid's     bicycles. I know that the four US based ones were offered in     some cereal box -- perhaps Wheaties? I'm not sure about the     other two. One perhaps for Belgum, and the other some Arabic     speaking country, I think. (That looks like the same number in     *real* Arabic numerals to the right side -- reading in from the     right to the left. I have no chance at reading what is above     the numbers -- just a guess that it is the Arabic version of the     somewhat more readable (to me) text -- perhaps indicating that     this is a privately owned vehicle, instead of part of a     commercial or government fleet.
    More of the first batch, but oval. Perhaps these and the first     batch were also for kid's bicycles?
958)    Perhaps for harvesting cane? Either Bamboo or sugar cane?     Totally a guess. :-)
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

screws into the three countersunk holes and the operator moves the handle with each five of whatever. Obviously, if there is more than one operator using it, it will function as a primative adding machine. The idea is that it is fairly easy to count reliably to five. It is also very easy to lose count somewhere around 47... I recall seeing something like it in a grain elevator where it was used for counting sacks stacked in a load.
953 -- towers for releasing racing pigeons???
954 Static electricity generator.
955 -- points look like they are intended to dig in. Maybe for picking up frozen fish or something???
956 -- some sort of combination tool -- I'll take a wild guess that it is used for some sort of musical instrument repair...
957 look like the tags kids used to use to decorate their bicycles back around 1950.
958 is an axe used in hewing logs square to be used for building.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the reply, I'll fix the answer page later tonight or tomorrow, I'm heading out the door in a couple minutes.
I got my description of grain shocks from the owner of the tool, maybe he thinking of a different grain other than oats. At the time when I made the answer page I couldn't find any links but just now found a good one that has photos of shocks being made. They seem to be making them about the size that you mention, I had no idea what size bundles were being used to create these shocks, but the photo marked 1:32:30 has a decent photo of someone carrying one:
http://tractorclub.artheimsoth.com/combine.html
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good set of pictures. That's pretty much how we worked too.
Somewhere I've got a picture of us feeding the thresher that I need to dig out and scan.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rob, No worries.
s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 23:06:31 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I want to see a video of you digging out and scanning that thresher! ;-)
Cheers! Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.