What is it? CLIV

This week's set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

Only 889 and not a real answer: "Koinzidenz - Maßstab" Spelling was wrong (nitpicking; in HTML that is &szlig; OOMH) "Carl Mahr esslingen aN" Really (nitpicking again), I bet it is "Esslingen" (a city in Germany). The "aN" means "am Neckar" (at the [river] Neckar);
Carl Mahr still exists and is making fine measuring instruments (calipers, micrometers, dial indicators etc.) <www.mahr.com>
"Koinzidenz Maßstab" is coincidence scale. In metrology, that means measuring wether events happen at the same time. That "event" would be a length in this case. So this scale can compare two lengths, but not measure them. I guess that there is a stop at the back of the device. An other way to understand coincidence is, that the marks for reading are not lying side by side, but are overlapping. That's why it is a glass-plate. You put it *over* the part to measure. So the etching of the graduation has to be on the back of the glass plate. What it *really* is used for, I don't know.
Maybe Mahr will be glad to answer that.
Nick
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R.H. wrote:

arena.
886 I don't know but I'll take one for my collection of hammers
888 If you push it farther down would it crimp some type of bottle cap?
889 looks like some type of photographic measuring device, used with recon aircraft images Joe
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wrote:

886 is the size of a meat tenderiser hammer. the pattern on the head is similar to one my mother has.

I'd second that.

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886. Tool for reforming points on the large star drills used for making blasting holes in mines.
The drill was heated, the tool placed over the worn point, and hit with a BFH. :)
Then the drill was hardened and tempered.
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My dad has one with the spike in the center that goes in the air hole. Funny thing, it is a 6 point shape, while most drill heads are 4 point. It sets the date B.C, before-carbide?
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#885 Smoothing tools, either for decorative plasterwork or for sand-casting in a foundry. If there are that many, I'd guess plastering.
#887 Flechette - air dropped anti-personnel dart, probably WW1
#889 Parallax viewer for measuring aerial photographs.
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884. Wheel Chock
888. Light bulb changer.
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    Newsgroups are working as they should, now. I was just down in the shop until late.
    So -- posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as usual.
884)    Looks like a wood version of a rub board for manual clothes     washing.
885)    They sort of look like soft jaws for fitting over vise or lathe     chuck jaws to minimize marring of a finished part.
886)    I don't know what it is for -- I just don't want to use it on     any of *my* workpieces.
    Perhaps for breaking up stone -- or ice?
887)    Fancy point for a flagpole -- with no national emblem (eagle)     involved, so it might be for a state flag.
888)    Perhaps for opening up a soft (and wet) leather valve for     something like a bilge pump?
889)    Interesting device.
    It looks as though it is a scale for measuring the motion of     something behind it.
    Or perhaps for measuring the position of something on a drawing     behind it? Or perhaps for verifying layout lines on a metal     workpiece?
    You set the zero end on a reference point on the drawing or     workpiece, then note the nearest cm and mm points, and adjust to     bring one of those totally in line with the final point on the     drawing.
    Now to go see what others have said, and then go to bed. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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R.H. wrote:

887. Harpoon point?
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It's a marking gauge, as evidenced by the point in the stick.

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884. Looks a bit like some pieces I have seen at museums described for patting and handling butter.
885. My first guess is castings, etc for preventing skate boarders to be installed on concrete/stone curbs, steps, etc.
886. I would have never guessed for reshaping rock drill bits, but it makes some sense.
887. Fancy plumb bob, though I prefer plumb Barbie: I went to look for this picture and just found out the one I have is a collector's item!!!! <http://cgi.ebay.com/OOP-RARE-12-OZ-NAKED-GIRL-PLUMB-BARBARA-BRUNSON-ESSER_W0QQitemZ120056319813QQihZ002QQcategoryZ13873QQcmdZViewItem
888. Lots of tooling, bending, and wood work. Maybe to stretch a condom/rubber band sort of thing; but I have no idea for what.
889. Much fancier than the majority of my tools.
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    [ ... ]

    Hmm ... perhaps for installing the tight rubber bands used for "painless" castration of farm animals? It is put in place, and the "unneeded" parts simply rot and fall off because there is no circulation to keep them alive.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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884. The hole in the end of the handle makes it look as though perhaps it hangs on a wall although equally it could be nailed down to a floor. Not that that helps me any.
885. They look like panel beaters dollies for forming thin metal.
886. The shape of the back end of the head would indicate that you are meant to strike that with another hammer so I'll go along with the rock drill reforming tool suggestion.
887. Tip of a lightning rod perhaps.
889. I would think this is used in cartography to accurately check a printed scale on a map which maybe had a reproduction error after printing or photocopying or to determine a scale on an aerial photograph. Imagine a 1:50000 map had a scale on it to indicate 5000 metres which was meant to be exactly 10cm long. You'd align the zero mark on the glass tool with one end of the map scale, zero the dial gauge and then adjust until the 10cm mark on the tool aligned with the other end of the map scale. The dial gauge would indicate the reproduction error and you could then calculate the resulting inaccuracy as a percentage.
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884 - Graduated bench stop?
885 - They look like plaster trowels. Different shapes and sizes for different uses.
886 - Looks like a staking tool.
887 - Plumb bob?
888 -
889 - Coincidence gauge.
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Here are some more photos of it, if you click on them they should get larger:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic888d.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic888e.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic888f.jpg

It takes easy/moderate pressure to push the plunger in and I didn't see any way to lock it in place.

Doesn't seem to be much wear on it. This tool isn't mine so I'll ask the owner to take a closer look.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

Is the leather still flexible? It almost looks like the plunger area is designed to go inside the handle.
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I asked the owner of it your question, also asked if the plunger could be locked in, and asked about the other end of the handle, here is his reply:
"No catch or latch to hold it in. It returns to full length immediately. No opening in the end of the wooden handle. There is drilled hole deep into the wood handle for rod and spring to escape into when the tool is depressed. What must appear to be leather is rubber. Like most old rubber it is hard and has some cracks. Only the center shaft (rod) and spring can get into the wooden part. All metal parts are brass."
Rob
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What does the other end look like?
It's size makes me suspect that it might be used for holding cones of yarn or thread fir the textile industry. But that is just a guess.
Paul K. Dickman

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Yes, I'm still thinking number 888 is some kind of bander, but for what exactly I don't know.
Rob
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