What is it? CL

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Bill Marrs wrote:

863 Actually, I believe those are to prevent ice freezing on the power lines by causing them to twist a little in the wind. In regions with less wind, they use larger, flat vanes. However, in windy regions, a cylinder is sufficient.
862 I believe this is a cutter for making silage.
--riverman
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oops, already one day late late this week, so only one silly guess...
865 at first sight i would have said ...pistol for mounting cable ties... but laser distance meter from Dave Baker seems to be a good guess too. as always, the text is hard to read.
greetings from germany chris
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You're right, I removed the word bale from my answer. Hay balers weren't common until at least the 1940's.
Rob
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"R.H." wrote:

And are disappearing now. You don't see haybales anymore, instead there are some sort of cylindrical things wrapped in plastic (I think). Probably improves immunity to rain.
--
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CBFalconer wrote:

Small square bales require too much manpower to move & store a ton of hay. The round things you see are called round bales. They can be different sizes and can weight over a ton. They can be handled by one man and tractor.
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In this area, they average 1500#.
Square bales weigh between 50# [Johnson Grass] and 85# [Alfalfa].
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On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 09:59:18 -0600, Ralph Henrichs

The move to large bales sure spoiled a bunch of fun for the kids. When the crew was storing bales for the winter a few of us kids would stand around watching. As soon as the crew left for another load we went to work creating tunnels and secret caverns in the pile. A lookout warned us when the next load was returning and we quickly covered the exit hole and watched them add to the pile. This process was repeated and at the end of the day the pile of bales was a lot bigger than it should have been and we had a wonderful secret playground for the winter.
Those huge round bales ruined that activity.
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weren't
I can certainly vouch for the handling of good old fashioned square bails. Long days for little pay. But, it was better than one dollar for picking one hundred pounds of cotton by hand.
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wrote:

Last time I picked up bales from the ground..I was driving a tractor hauling a bail loader. As long as the bale went into the chute...it would stack em nice and neat on the trailer. Most modern farms do that these days.
Gunner
Political Correctness
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Gunner wrote:

I worked on a dairy farm in 1969. Two of us stacked bales in a wagon with eight-foot sides towed behind a baler. I'd grab the ejected bale and toss it to the guy who was stacking.
IIRC, the baler tossed bales over the front side of the wagon. Now I'm not sure about it. Bales tossed that high would probably have been erratic. One of them could have broken my neck if I didn't see it coming. A lot of them would probably have broken on impact.
Does anyone remember how balers tossed bales into towed wagons?
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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 09:08:08 -0500, Doghouse

At abouut the same time, in northern Illinois, the hay wagons on my uncles' farms, and other farms nearby, didn't have a front side. They had slat-sides on the side-sides and at the rear, but nothing between the baler and the catcher. The bales came out low, maybe a foot, a foot and a half, above the bed of the wagon.
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

That sounds right. I guess I was using what I could remember to reconstruct what I couldn't remember. The part about throwing the bales up would have been me throwing them up to the stacker.
I remember one incident very well. I was on my motorcycle one morning, riding out to bring in 120 cows. The sun was in my face my faceplate was scratchy. By the time I saw the three strands of barbed wire across the road, it was too late to stop.
They were the kind of barbs that dug in instead of merely scratching. To get loose I had to take the time to remove the barbs one by one from my flesh. I became aware that I was standing in a mud puddle and the fence was electrified, but one can't be rushed in performing surgery like that.
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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 14:35:33 -0500, Doghouse

Oooh. Ouch.
I lookied through an old photo album, and I have to take back part of what I said. Most of my uncles' hay wagons didn't have sides. Only slat-built backs.
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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 14:13:51 -0600, Barbara Bailey
<snip

Same here. The slat back was usually at a slight angle too, leaning towards the back or away from the trailer. The bailer had a long shoot and there was usually a slight incline up to the trailer. The bales would be pushed along at the same rate as bales were being made by the bailer. Standing on the wagon, grab the bale, stack it on the trailer and turn around, repeat... If you were good, you could get the bales stacked on a trailer like this 6 to 7 tiers high and not have any fall off before reaching the barn :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Doghouse wrote:

... snip ...

What sort of idiot put barbed wire across a road. I would have taken him apart.
--
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CBFalconer wrote:

I didn't blame him. It was a one-lane dirt road for access to his pastures. I hadn't been to that pasture before. He did not anticipate anyone going so fast. The wire was conspicuous. I did not anticipate the effect of the low sun on my scratchy visor.
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wrote:

http://www.hoelscherinc.com/testimony_balestacker.htm http://www.major-grasscare.com/agriculture/stacker.htm http://www.hayingmantis.com /
etc etc
Find a need..they will invent.....
Gunner
Political Correctness
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My dad uses a smaller version of one of the following:
<http://www.newholland.com/h4/products/products_series_detail.asp?Reg=NA&RL=ENNA&NavID 0001277003&series0005218311>
These were developed in the late 60's and make the use of smaller bales remain attractive to smaller farmers. I was lucky, my granddad was getting to where he couldn't help stack hay and I being a young sprout of about 10 years old was not deemed sufficiently "robust" to be able to help stack all of the hay. So Dad invested in a New Holland bale wagon. Remarkably clever design yet almost dead stupid in the relatively small number of moving parts required to make this miracle of mechanical and hydraulic engineering work.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 21:18:39 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Very very common here in my area. A treat to use.
Gunner

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

<http://www.newholland.com/h4/products/products_series_detail.asp?Reg=NA&RL=ENNA&NavID 0001277003&series0005218311>
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ I was going to suggest that it is popular with any farmer that puts up more than a few hundred squares a year. I think they self propelled ones are over $100,000. My regular hay farmer bought a new one last year. It was about 20 years old or more and had been sitting in a barn with broken out windows. A little paint and sweeping out of the glass any he had a newer than his old one bale wagon. Under 10,000 for a good used machine with relatively low hours. The problem that the farmers have here is that the old barns were not built high enough to tip a full stack. Some guys have to skip the last row or two because they stack is too tall when tipped. Of course farmers that built barns in anticipation of the automatic bale wagon have no issues. They can also stack the round bales 3 bales tall inside the barn.
The old farms on my mother's side did not have hay storage like that. I remember playing in the lofts tossing I guess Timothy squares about. It was eastern Indiana so it definitely was not Bermuda. My dad tells tales of helping gather hay when he was a kid so that was 70+ years ago. Pitch forks, hay wagon and people stomping on the stacks to get more on the wagon. Internal combustion powered machinery has definitely reduced a lot of human labor. Kind of like electricity in a wood shop.
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