What is it? CCXXVI

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Just posted a new set, hopefully someone will be able identify the first piece, I think I know what it is but I haven't been able to confirm it.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1264 looks like a film cartidge. I am guessing 35 mm.
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It's Ampex. That's magnetic sound recording tape or video tape rather than film.
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On Thu, 3 Apr 2008 16:22:42 +0200 (CEST), Barbara Bailey

Judging from the cart size and the "AMPEX" I'm making an educated guess - it's a short chunk of first-gen 2" helical scan video tape, three or four minutes max. Probably for commercials or news footage.
Note how they put the label on the spool instead of the cartridge - bet you they could put just the spool on the shelf for compact storage, and thread another into the cartridge.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Indeed. Except for the width of the tape, it's pretty similar to the tape cartridges I used back when I worked at a radio station in the early 80's. I wasn't sure whether sound tape was ever that wide (for instance in a recording studio,) so I wasn't willing to categorically rule it out. However, in those, the tape reels weren't removable, but the carts themselves stored quite compactly on racks.
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First, I don't know if 2" was ever available in helical scan. The 2" Ampex we used at the ETS station I worked at was quadruplex. But that was in the '60s.
I never saw a cartridge before. We used reel-to-reel for everything. Except for the film chain, that is.
-- Ed Huntress
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1264 This is a video tape cartridge. Transverse video tape. Used in a studio to play commercials. A whole bunch of cartridges, each with its own commercial were held in the cartridge jukebox machine. Back in the days when a commercial break only held 4 or 6 commercials, these machines were used to edit or compose the tape played during a commercial break, to bring us the benefits of new, improved products. Before the wonderful cartridge tape jukebox machine, some person had to mount tapes of each commercial on a machine by hand and edit them into the sequence. Nowadays, we are informed of the benefits of sponsor's products with fully digital commercial assembly systems.

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1265: ice shaver
Northe
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1264. film container of sorts 1266. Grain sampler probe(you shoved it into a grain pile with a rod, gave it a twist and it opened up sampling the grain at that depth, the chain held it together till you dumped the sample then repeat the process) 1268 carpet layer tack hammer?????????????????

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    As always, posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
1263)    To me -- this looks like a combination of a walking cane     and a hook to hold down the head of a snake prior to     killing it.
    A little more detail at the small end might help if you can     still get it.
    An alternative might be a sceptre for a ruler or a cleric, but     that does not seem to make sense given the time and location.
1264)    A tape cartridge. The Ampex name supports that part. However     it seems to be an unusually wide tape. Not large enough spools     to justify considering it to be a predecessor to the U-matic     video cartridges (which were 3/4" tape IIRC), and this looks     closer to 1-3/4" or perhaps even 2". And it would require     spooling out from the cartridge to wrap around a drum for     helical scan to get a sufficient data rate. I think that     perhaps it is for some kind of multi-track data recorder.
1265)    Perhaps for producing shaved ice for beverages?
1266)    Perhaps part of an air-dropped minefield marker? The end     cap threads would accept a rod with a flag to mark the     minefield. It could be dropped folded at the chain, and on the     way down the flag would cause the parts to align so when the     point hit the ground it would dig in and the cap would snap into     place.
1267)    Perhaps the upper end of a sword scabbard?
1268)    Interesting hammer. One end for chipping, one for driving     and a flange on the top perhaps for prying a board loose from a     crate?
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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wrote:

Just FYI, 2" Ampex tapes originally were quad, not helical. But Sony developed some helical 2" and Ampex, IIRC, used the Sony patents for color.
As I've thought about that cartridge I wonder if it's from the automatic cartridge loader that Ampex developed somewhat later.
-- Ed Huntress
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Ampex video tape cartridge 50 mm wide sounds about right. These were not helical scanned! So this could be a very short segment - commercial or news feed?
http://www.secretlifeofmachines.com/secret_life_of_the_video.shtml
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I've shown this to a number of artifact experts and they agree with you that it's probably a walking stick, except it appears to be missing the ferrule on the small end and the owner may have later added a hook for some unknown reason.
Here is a close-up of the small end:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%208/pic1263d.jpg
Rob
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    O.K. I agree that it once had a ferrule and no longer does. Looking at the hook shows that it is not suitable for snake capture as I had first thought (it would have to be rigid for that). It also appears to have had that hook in place for quite some time, based on the wear visible where the eye forks out. It might have been for hanging it on a wall or fence, or for pulling found objects on the path closer.
    Are the insignia and the date on the head stamped into gold? Or is that brass which has been kept polished? I would expect more wear on that if the latter.
    Thanks,         DoN.
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According to the owner, the metal is lead.
Below are two more close-ups, the owner thinks that they show some type of crest carved into the wood:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%208/pic1263cr1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%208/pic1263cr2.jpg
I didn't post them earlier because there isn't much detail and they're almost impossible to read.
Rob
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    [ ... ]

    Interesting. Problems in the white balance during the photography, then.

    To me, they look more like natural structures in the wood grain, perhaps where a branch split off from the main trunk used for carving that.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Well ... that depends. I have a friend who is a quite successful decorative woodturner, and he often incorporates flaws into his works -- to a very nice effect.

    Well ... I have two old straight canes.
    The first of them (which I described before in this thread) has a copper ferrule around the tip and the OD measures at 0.582".
    The second is a dark wood (mahogany or ebony, with black lacquer), with a handle in the form of a hand griping something about the size of cigar (whale tooth for both parts), and an ivory or bone tip at the ground end which measures 0.607" diameter.
    And as both of these have rubber cane caps on them to allow use indoors without slipping or marring finely finished wooden floors, these measurements were made perhaps 5/8" up from the bottom, so slightly larger in diameter than the smallest end. And I've had no problems using them outdoors on normal paths without the caps. Granted, on soggy ground they would sink in, but then so would the feet. :-)

    Granted, There are times when something to protect yourself is advisable.

    There were also a lot of people who carried small pistols for such confrontations.

    Hmm ... you might want to try it with that and with a real fencing sword for comparison. I think that ball handle would lose in terms of control.

    This I consider the more useful end for dog repelling.

    Perhaps so -- but you would need tools to remove the hook and install the point given the diameter of the wire which forms the eye.

    Perhaps -- or perhaps not.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    You're talking about current times. Since the cane was dated 1870, and it was presumed that it was dated for the date of birth of the owner, then we can probably consider the period in which iw might have been used to be around 1890 to 1940 or so -- before it was problematic to shoot a dog which was attacking you.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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E Z Peaces wrote:

by a surveyor?
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[talk about topic-drift!]
E Z Peaces said:
<snip>

I can't help wondering whether you watch only a very little television, or perhaps even none at all. Let me explain why I wonder. Lest the faint-hearted be reading this, fear not - no dogs are involved!
In Gloucester (UK) city centre, there is (or was) a Sainsbury's supermarket with a (well-used) back exit onto a side road. Across the street is (or was) a seating area, perhaps 30 yards from the shop exit. One busy, sunny Saturday morning about - oh, it has to be at least N years ago, if not longer, I was sitting on one of the benches, half-reading one of those wastes of moneyESC3b3cwcomputer magazines and half-watching the world go by.
A woman emerged from the supermarket, pushing a trolley about half-full of heavy shopping. A very young child (maybe 2-3 years) rode in the child seat. Unwittingly, the woman pushed the trolley over an extremely uneven part of the paving, and the trolley started to tip. She tried to correct for it, but wasn't quite strong enough to do so, and it was clear that she was going to lose this battle. The shopping would soon be all over the road - and the child might easily sustain an injury.
But the woman wasn't giving up easily, and was losing the battle sslloowwllyy. I could see that all she needed was one kind person to offer her an extra Newton or two in the required direction, and there were at least ten people closer to her than I was, most of whom had noticed what was happening and several of whom had actually stopped walking, so I just watched, waiting for one of them to react. After all, they were much, much closer than I was, and they were already standing up!
But nobody went to her. Not *one* person.
After about 10 seconds (half an eternity if you're the one fighting the trolley), I realised that nobody was going to move an inch for this poor woman, so I ran over as fast as I could, grabbed the basket *just* in time, hauled it upright, and moved it to safer paving.
By the time I'd got home, I'd worked out what I consider to be the most likely explanation for the lack of help - TOO MUCH TV!
People have become accustomed to seeing the most distressing situations unfold before their eyes, without being able to *do* anything. Que sera, sera! They are so used to not being in a position to help, that they have got out of the way of helping. They have become de-sensitised to other people's danger, so they just watch, and watch, and watch. And then they say how terribly sad it all is.
(Note that the "fear for personal safety" explanation, which also occurred to me, didn't really apply here - nobody could seriously believe, surely, that the woman would turn on them if they helped her.)
Having been a television non-watcher for quite a few years, I had not been de-sensitised in the same way, and so I was free to help. (I claim no great credit for this - I know that any rec.puzzler, metalworker, or woodworker would have done the same if they'd been present.)
My closing moral is taken from the theme song of a weekend television program in the late 1970s:
Sitting at home, watch TV Turn it off, no good to me Why don't you? Why don't you? Why don't youswitchoffyourtelevisionsetgoanddosomethinglessboringinstead?
ObPuzzle/ObMetalwork/ObWoodwork: can you devise a suitable ObPuzzle/ObMetalwork/ObWoodwork suffix to a cross-post to rec.crafts.metalworking, rec.puzzles, and rec.woodworking, that could possibly compensate for straying so far off-topic? Recursive solutions are acceptable!
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
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