What is it? CCXXI

This week I know only one of them for sure, though I have some ideas on a couple of the others, hopefully we will get all of them identified:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1233 While not an identification of this object, it clearly is a thing to make a groove around a cylindrical stick.
1234 A dating stamp, to mark a production date on some metal product.
1236 A Weston Standard Cell. Produces a standard known voltage. 1.0183 volts.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 04:21:06 -0500, R.H. wrote:

I have fun with these even though I'm nowhere near as knowledgeable as everybody else guessing. So here are my completely off-the-wall guesses.
1233. Used to crease something, as well as punch holes in it? I can't imagine wanting to crease leather, but that was my first thought
1234: The numbers in the first photo are a mirror image, which leads me to believe the ring was designed to be inked and have the numbers be transferred (in series) to something else. But there are only fifteen numbers, and I can't think offhand of anything that would go in a cycle of fifteen.
1235: A hammer for hitting some sort of ceremonial bell?
1236: Damned if I know
1237: A very primitive, and painful, colonoscope. :-)
1238: There are slits on the bottom if I see the third photo correctly, leading me to believe it's some sort of plane.
Now to see what the *right* answers are....
--
Ted S.
fedya at bestweb dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1233: If the cutter is reversed, I'd guess it is for sizing tenons on a lathe or some similar function. If the cutter is not reversed I'm stumped, although it would cut beads.
1238: These photos were just on the rec.woodworking board, asking if it might be a plane of some type. I answered: Appears to be a scraper, although it looks a little heavy for most woodworking applications. Could possibly have been a metalworking tool, or one for a trade such as printing. Looks as though it may have another fence on the right side, which would make it useful for planing/scraping items to thickness on the bench. Such as for inlays, fishing rod sections, or something of that sort. Scraping brass inlays to size?
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1237 is a voltage probe used by Telco employees. Connect the clamp at the coiled end to ground, touch the end of the rod to a questionable down guy and see if the neon light comes on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

I wonder about 1237? What's the wand made of? What about the contact? How long is each wire? What sort of light bulb is in the barrel?
Abilities Inc. finds employment for disabled people, some of whom are in wheelchairs. A person in a wheelchair may be well insulated from the ground. This could be an advantage or a disadvantage.
Maybe the person avoids static shocks by clipping one lead to the chair and using the wand to touch a grounded object. The light might flash if there was a big charge.
Maybe the person in the chair works on electrical circuits, and he can reach out with the wand to see if a circuit is energized.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    Then again -- it could be that they, like Lighthouse for the Blind -- make things for large purchasers. Lighthouse made the ball point pens issued in every government agency, even though the workers never would actually *use* the product. It was a form of employment. I suspect that Abilities Inc is a similar setup.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

I think you're right. LDC says Telcos used it, but they may not have been all. Abilities, Inc. had contracts with the Department of Defense and GE, among others.
It reminds me of a "dead man's stick," used to make sure equipment is discharged. The bulb could indicate if the equipment is live, but I don't understand the location. Unless there's a lot of resistance within the wand, the wire from the wand to the bulb could be a shock hazard. Besides, if you want the bulb visible to the user, shouldn't it be on the wand and not hanging three feet below the user's hand?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There certianly could be users in addition to Telcos.
Of course there is a lot of resistance in the stick as it was intended to find stray voltage, including high voltages. You are supposed to hold the little round casing in your hand so you could orient for best visibility. As I recall (it's been many years since I used one!!) the light is recessed so it is shaded and easier to see faint illuminations of the bulb when the voltage is low..
When using it, you would often have to extend you arm it such a position so the you would not be able to see a light mounted in the rod. The purpose of the device is to keep the tester away from the item being tested. Putting the light in the end of the rod would be counter to that goal. (Picture this being used in a wide variety of conditions: in the rain, pushing through thick brush, clearance obstructed by fences, etc,)
--Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here is a link to the BSP (Bell System Practice) detailing the device and its use. http://xy3.com/bsp/pdf//081-705-101.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LDC wrote:

Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My guesses and thoughts...
1233 -- Tool for making or truing up dowels or circular tenons. The wood is roughly rounded and placed in the wedge-shaped cage, and the gouge blade advanced to take off a shaving while spinning the handle around the wood. It appears that this would only be effective on pretty nearly round pieces already, so I'm thinking its mostly for tenon work.
1234 -- Gage for various diameters of...something. It would also make a dandy trivet, but that doesn't appear to be the intended use.
1235 -- Possibly a gas burner (for pre-electric-light illumination).
1236 -- I'd guess this is some sort of demonstration or laboratory apparatus used in thermodynamics--possibly a demonstration of a refrigeration cycle or a hygrometer of some sort. I'm not at all sure, though.
1237 -- Possibly some training or therapy device for disabled persons. The wand would be moved through some sort of a metal labyrinth and contact with the edges indicated by the bulb, akin to the child's game Operation. The "Abilities, Inc." name could go along with this; one quite interesting semi-related obituary is here: http://www.ilusa.com/articles/Dr_viscardia.htm
1238 -- This appears to be a rather peculiar rabbet plane. The iron appears to be in backwards. This doesn't look as though it were intended for wood, based on the blade angle and the fineness of the adjustments; possibly it's for some (relatively soft?) metal. No clue as to the precise purpose, though.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. -- Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1233)    A device for turning a groove in round wood -- presumably     for something which won't fit in a lathe. You slip it over     the end to where you need it to be, tighten the handle to move     the bronze piece with the concave curve against the side of the     wood and start rotating it around the workpiece. The depth of     the groove is preset by loosening the steel round-headed slotted     screw and sliding the gouge. I believe that the round-headed     screw was originally a knurled knob on the end of a screw, but     it got lost and replaced. Or it could have been a wing-headed     screw, like the wing-nut which locks the projection of the     concave curve into the V-frame.
1234)    I suspect that this was used to mark the date of manufacture     (month and year) on some product. Given the material, I suspect     that it may have been heated and burned into a wood part.
    Since it has sixteen stations, I suspect that it covers more     than a year. What happens when the numbers reach "12-56"? does     it then change to "1-57" Or does it start before "1-56"? You     put the changeover zone as far from the lens and as far out of     focus as you could manage. Was that intentional? :-)          Anyway -- it would be replaced with a new one when the dates are     exhausted. And I suspect that some of the overlap (12 months     per year vs 16 stations) is to give you time to order the next     year's marker. I'm surprised that they did not simply make it     with movable type -- but perhaps the typeface wears out in a     year of use. I see that they are marked with underscores on the     back, which suggest to me that they extend through 1-57 to 3-57.
    Could you not have come up with a more interesting one for a     four consecutive digits item number? :-)
1235)    I'm not sure about the rod part, but the bucket part looks like     a tipping measuring bucket. The bucket is pivoted on the two     ears, and the sliding weight on the rod below the bucket is     adjusted so it tips at a particular volume. Similar (but much     smaller) ones are used in electronic rainfall gauge sensors.
1236)    Since I see no way to get the liquid out and replace it with     new, I suspect that it was part of a one-time experiment.
    It looks as though the wires are connected to a sheet metal     collar which goes around one side bulb. And it looks like     pressed paper insulating washers under the head of the screw and     the (presumed) nut on the other side, so I suspect that the     brown liquid is sensitive to magnetic fields (as would be     produced by current passing through the collar).
    It might be interesting to move a permanent magnet near the fluid     and see if it is attracted to the magnet.
1237)    this looks designed to test for live wires. What voltage is     determined by the voltage rating of the bulb in the barrel.
    Clip the clip (looks like a bulldog clip instead of a 'gator     clip) on ground, and touch the terminal at the far end of the     insulated handle to the points to be tested.
1238)    A specialized (and *very* nicely made) plane for producing a     profile in the edge of a board which would look like this (use     a fixed-pitch font to avoid distortion of the ASCII graphics):
+----+ | | | +---+ | | | | | | | | | | | | ~~~~~~~~ <-- more board beyond this -- not worth drawing. :-)
     I think that it is called a "rabbet" plane.
    Now to see what others have said.
     Enjoy,          DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
greetings from germany
1235 a mortar and pestle (right words?), used to crush or grind materials in pharmacies or chemical laboratory
i am sorry, this week only one silly guess
chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi R.H. i just found this side concerning 1235: http://www.historische-apotheke.de/html/body_morser.html might be a hint... some of them look similar
greetings from germany chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks! I think this is the correct answer, I just sent the link to the owner and added it to the answer page.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Except that none of them have the rod with the sliding counterweight which (along with the pour hole in the side) make me think of a measuring bucket.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hey DoN and RH,
Sure looks like the photos at the site from Chris Stuben. One is identical.
I'd bet that it got turned into a table-lamp at some time after it's useful life in the pharmacy was over. That would account for both the hole in the "bell", and the rod. This sort of cannibalization was quite common in the 1930's to the 60's.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.