What is it? CCIII

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1128
It's a U.S. Internal Revenue Service standard hydrometer set for determining the alcohol content of liquor.
The red E visible next to George Washington's head possibly dates it to 1889.
Bill
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Quite a nice variety this time around. Lots of fun guessing.
1122 - This sure looks like a 50' tape measure, of the sort commonly used to lay out athletic fields, building plots, etc. That seems far too obvious, though, so I suspect it must have some particular specialized usage; since none other pops into mind, I'll guess it's to adjust the pin setters in a bowling alley.
1123 - Googling AAI turns up several references to the American Alpine Institute, so this is presumably used to carry stuff for some mountaineering trek. At four and a half feet long, I'd guess it was used for large-scale maps rolled up (perhaps maps that are being surveyed/drawn). The other option that comes to mind is firearms, but I don't know why anyone would bother carrying one in such an inconvenient and unnecessarily bulky package when it's something you probably want to have ready at hand in case it were needed suddenly.
1124 - self-powered soldering iron, perhaps burning acetylene generated by carbide and water in the cylindrical portion.
1125 - maybe a spatula/measurer for use by a pharmacist to mix or transfer medicines? Gold might be used in such a situation because it's comparatively inert and not likely to be affected by or to contaminate the substances being handled.
1126 - A match safe?
1127 - Quite a curious double tape; the legends appear to suggest use in determining the strengths of various forms made of various materials. Perhaps this is for reference in erecting temporary bridges?
1128 - Besides being a test kit for some chemical or physical property of a (specific?) liquid, not much is obvious. The engraved images look suspiciously like those on banknotes, so perhaps it was used to either detect forgeries or to verify ink compositions in a mint.
Now to see other guesses...
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R.H. wrote:

Mount Ranier, which is ranier than most mountains. They have a Leave No Trace policy.
They go around the cliffs on the way up. It's important to do so on the way down, too; for an unexpected encounter with a cliff on wet ice in the dark could result in a descent too fast for the safety of trainees.
They used to leave trails of biodegradable bread crumbs. Then flocks of scavenging birds learned to follow these expeditions.
The tube held a battery-powered spinning reel with a spool four feet long. The guide would leave a trail of luminous fishing line on the ascent. On the descent he'd press the button to reel it up.
Once again intuition has led us to the truth.
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1122: Looks like a glass cutting tool. Not sure why it would be spring-loaded.
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Oops, sent too soon
1123: Map case 1124: Gas-powered soldering iron 1125: Solid gold? How about you just send it to me and I'll... look into it. Yeah, that's it, look into it. Seriously? Sometimes a spoon is just a spoon. 1126: Looks like a mailbox, although somewhat small. 1127: It's a Walsco 380 double tape measure, calibrated for all types of concrete, masonry, timber, and earth. But it's evidentally no good for rectangles of some sort. 1128: A weather station. The cup would be a rain gauge, perhaps. Not sure about the two things with presidential portraits, unless they're for measuring "dry bulb" and "wet bulb" temperatures... Hayes would be dry, of course.
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R.H. wrote:

1126. Matchbox to hang on the wall near the woodstove
1128. Looks like a set of hygrometers. (For different ranges?)
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    Posting from rec.crafs.metalworking as usual.
1122)    For measuring the amount of oil (or gasoline) in a tank.
    The notches in the weight will retain more of the liquid, making     it easier to identify the level. And the scale on the weight     indicates the number of inches to add to the reading on the     tape.
    I've seen similar tapes advertised in the L.S. Starrett catalog.     This might actually be one -- I can't make out the maker's name     because of the JPEG blurring.
1123)    Well -- aside from appearing to be a cylindrical container, it     *might* be a small astronomical telescope, with the ends capped.     (Another view would indicate where the mount would go if this     were the case.
1124)    A gasoline (or kerosene) fueled soldering iron.
1125)    Hmm ... aside form the "solid gold" part (and the color does     not really look right for that in the photo) it looks like it     could be a wax spoon for re-waxing reed plates in an accordion.
    The "handle" part could be used for waxing the smaller reed     plates.
    The wax is melted, scooped up in the spoon, and run along the     edges of the reed plates to seal them to the reed boxes.
1126)    Hmm ... perhaps to hold a watchmen's recording clock key, to     record that the watchman was at that specific location (station)     at a specific time. You've had recording clocks on the puzzles     before.
1127)    Hmm ... perhaps for measuring stress applied to the specified     materials for a specific size of container?
    Or perhaps for calculating the weight of the materials of the     measured dimensions?
    And I gather that the markings are on both sides of the tapes,     different depending on the material being checked.
1128)    This is for measuring the specific gravity of a fluid at a     specified temperature. The thermometer on the side measures the     temperature, and the height at which the narrow neck of the     floats intersects the top of the liquid shows the specific     gravity. There are single-use ones of these combining a bulb     syphon and the float for measuring the specific gravity of the     electrolyte in automotive batteries -- seen less often with     today's sealed cells and gel-cells.
    I doubt that this is for battery electrolyte, as the copper     container would be vulnerable to the acids. But it might be for     a brewer or winemaker.
    The faces on the seals inside the floats may indicate different     measurement systems -- one looks like George Washington from a     dollar bill. :-)
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

I wonder if it's to check the water table. A farmer might need to know how low the water level was in his well and how it was changing.
Maybe he could shine a light down the well to see when the weight hit the water. He could read on the tape how far down the clip was, reel it in, and if he could see water on the weight, he could read how far below the clip the water level was.
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    Think of the tanks in "tank farms" -- where a bunch of fuel tanks are kept in a large compound -- the kind where the tank trucks go to fill up prior to delivering to the local fuel stations.

    Nope -- it is for fuel tanks -- serious sized ones.

    That is how it is used -- but for fuel oil or gasoline.
    Not sure that I would lower a steel tape into a water well -- even assuming that the light could shine far enough down a well pipe.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    O.K. That one shows versions for both crude and distillates (both petroleum products) and nothing mentioned for water, so I think that we can strike the water well checking for these.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

I guess I haven't been close to many big oil tanks. I guessed they weren't more than 30 feet deep.
This says the State of Kansas uses steel tapes to measure down to the water table in 1,380 wells each year: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Geophysics/well.html
This says a steel tape is the best tool: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/pic12/pic12_2.htm
Here the USDA recommends using a steel tape: http://wmc.ar.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/GW/gradsteeltape.html
The tapes pictured ought to work fine for water wells, but for water they recommend putting chalk on the tape so you don't have to worry about just how far to lower it.
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    [ ... ]

    Even so -- a longer tape than needed is better than one not long enough. :-)
    Note that 50' was the *shortest* of those listed in the URL above.

    O.K. I would have worried about the tape trapping water between layers and rusting -- not a problem with petroleum fluids. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Bill Rider wrote:

50 feet isn't going to cut it for water wells. 150 to 300 feet is moderate, some go as deep as 1000 feet.
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