What is it? CCIII

Page 2 of 3  


Pffhhht. Pedantic grammar tyrant. <g>
From loosey-goosey (descriptive) Websters:
3 : compose, constitute <a misconception as to what comprises a literary generation - William Styron> <about 8 percent of our military forces are comprised of women - Jimmy Carter>
usage Although it has been in use since the late 18th century, sense 3 is still attacked as wrong. Why it has been singled out is not clear, but until comparatively recent times it was found chiefly in scientific or technical writing rather than belles lettres. Our current evidence shows a slight shift in usage: sense 3 is somewhat more frequent in recent literary use than the earlier senses. You should be aware, however, that if you use sense 3 you may be subject to criticism for doing so, and you may want to choose a safer synonym such as compose or make up.
From almost as loosey-goosey Dictionary.com:
-Usage note Comprise has had an interesting history of sense development. In addition to its original senses, dating from the 15th century, "to include" and "to consist of" (The United States of America comprises 50 states), comprise has had since the late 18th century the meaning "to form or constitute" (Fifty states comprise the United States of America). Since the late 19th century it has also been used in passive constructions with a sense synonymous with that of one of its original meanings "to consist of, be composed of": The United States of America is comprised of 50 states. These later uses are often criticized, but they occur with increasing frequency even in formal speech and writing.
From constipated (prescriptive) American Heritage:
USAGE NOTE: The traditional rule states that the whole comprises the parts and the parts compose the whole. In strict usage: The Union comprises 50 states. Fifty states compose (or constitute or make up) the Union. Even though careful writers often maintain this distinction, comprise is increasingly used in place of compose, especially in the passive: The Union is comprised of 50 states. Our surveys show that opposition to this usage is abating. In the 1960s, 53 percent of the Usage Panel found this usage unacceptable; in 1996, only 35 percent objected. See Usage Note at include.
Yer fightin' an uphill battle, Rich.
-- Ed Huntress
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used that word because I already had "hold" and "contain" on the same page, although I later editted out the sentence with contain. It didn't sound perfect but I kept it in, not knowing that grammar police was one of your many hats. :-)

Thanks for posting that, I feel better about the word choice, though I haven't decided yet if I'm going to keep it or not, decisions like this shouldn't be rushed.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey, it's not easy being a grammar policeman. It's like a lot of hard-won skills. Just when you really get the hang of dropping the pin in those little holes in a rotary indexing table, along comes CNC. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

1122: 50' steel surveyors tape 1123: AAI Amateur Astronomers Incorporated...Probably either a telescope case or the case for a telescope mounting. (tripod) 1124: Cordless soldering iron. (old style) liquid fueled, probably white gas... 1125: Gold suggests that it was used with something that reacts with other metals, 1G suggests a measured weight, might have been used to weigh out pharmaceuticals or reactive powders. 1126: ??? 1127: For calculating the weight of various materials based on their measurements. 1128: a specific gravity tester, probably used to detect some kind of counterfeiting ( based upon the "currency-esque' papers in the bulbs)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Surveyor's tape.
Tube, probably got something inside.
Very nice soldering iron.
Pharmacist's tool for scooping powder from bottles.
Match box.
Seabee's tape measure.
Official White House hydrometer.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This answer is correct. I was thinking of posting a secondary question about it on the site but I'll post it here instead, what is the purpose of the small part sticking out of the lid? It's located in the middle towards the back, about 1/2" or less from the hinge.
Rob
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps to expand the end of a cigar so it may more easily be lit.
--
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matthew T. Russotto wrote:

Maybe to keep the lid from opening beyond a point where gravity would close it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Rider wrote:

Found it! 45,554, W H Andrews, 1864. Once again intuition leads us to the truth!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Good job on finding the patent, here is a photo of the lid in which the text can be read:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/album%207/pic1126lg.jpg
I'm still trying to figure out the second line, where it says "For matches & C.", the fourth line reads "D.N & Co.", so the "& C." in the second line doesn't seem to make sense. A close-up can be seen here:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/album%207/pic1126cu.jpg
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

&C was used for etc way back when
Howard Garner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks! I hadn't seen that before.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The &c is an old abbreviation for et cetera (which, of course, is latin for "and the others" or something very similar).
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's actually a rendering of 'etc.'. '&' is 'Et'. I know Nokia's corporate font always used to have an ampersand which was clearly a ligature of the two letters, for example, similar in proportions to the second step in the following:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Ampersand_Evolution.png

'Et alii/aliae/alia' are 'and others'; 'etc.' is 'and the rest'. Thus repeated etc.'s are redundant.
Phil
--
Dear aunt, let's set so double the killer delete select all.
-- Microsoft voice recognition live demonstration
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*sigh* the failings of modern education.
The ampersand symbol is derived from 'et'. as in 'et cetera'. If you look _closely_ at one, you'll even see where the 't' is crossed on the stroke that goes up-right from the bottom of the figure.
Care to guess what the 'C' stands for? <*GRIN*>
This is a _standard_ abbreviation in older writing.
*
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd guess it stands for cetera, which would give us "and so forth".
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

&c is a short-hand abbreviation for et cetera.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I see several have answered. Before reading their replies, this very old puzzle is what popped up in my mind.
http://www.wendycarlos.com/resources/if-the.txt
Full page with some background info, but no answer:-( Click on "funny Bones" or scroll down about three quarters.
http://www.wendycarlos.com/resources.html
Absolutely stumped as to what "B" is in this context. I *think* I have solved the rest...
--
William


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Such a cluttered page, took forever to find what you were referencing-- reproduced here for convenience:
"A sign over a fireplace mantle in New Hampshire has this puzzle on it. I saw it in a charming old Inn while having dinner with friends in the late '70's, and it caught my eye. The last line seemed clear enough, but how about the rest?
If the BMT put more : If the B . putting : Never put more : over a - der You'd be an * it
So I scribbled it down, and when I got home tried to figure it out. Turned out that the terminology was kind of archaic, but then it was a puzzle from some word-playing "Yankee" made up over a hundred years ago. At first it's harder than it looks. Eventually it dawns on you what it's all about. Simple stuff, and kind of corny, too. Think of where the sign is located, near the grate of a roaring fireplace, where strangers might have helped out fueling the flames-- IF they knew their English!"
Answering your question, it's a two letter word which has 28 separate meanings in contemporary English. homophonic with the name for a 3 letter insect.
spoiler follows
"If the grate be empty, put more coal on. If the grate be full, stop putting more coal on. Never put more coal on over a - der You'd be an ass to risk` it
'-' has me stumped so far -- should work out to something like 'hot cin(der)' I _think_. can't make 'dash', or 'hyphen' fit
"B" -> (archaic for upper case) "Great B" -> grate be ":" -> "colon' -> coal on ".' -> (older _British_ usage) "full stop" -> full, stop "*" -> "asterisk" -> ass to risk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Try harder with hyphen. Or don't bother rather, it's probably the weakest part of the puzzle. "High fender".
--
Patrick Hamlyn posting from Perth, Western Australia
Windsurfing capital of the Southern Hemisphere
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.