What is it? CCI

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109. I'd guess it was either a gearing system for a hand brace (not sure about the offset), or for drilling holes a set distance from the previous hole (since it's not adjustable for different distances, that's probably a lame guess). 110. Since the rollers aren't sharp edged, it's not for cutting and must be for crimping/corrugating sheet metal. It appears to be adjustable - you could swap the mating rollers to provide the correct spacing. In use...sheesh, maybe for crimping the end of sheet metal prior to working the interlocking edges for making a cylinder? The reduced/crimped end would nest inside the uncrimped end of another tube. So I guess it's for some sort of ductwork that doesn't require it to be watertight. 111. Huh? 112. Huh? 113. The tabbed end looks like it was meant to be mounted to something, so maybe something for cutting tube or bar stock on a bench. 114. I'm told it's the Whitestone Bridge, but I have my doubts.
R
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Largely guesses this time 'round, not that that's too unusual.
1109 -- Evidently this is a little gear train, seemingly to cause the two shafts to rotate in opposite directions. One shaft appears to connect to a hand bit brace; the other possibly accepts a (missing) handle with a square shank held by a concentric setscrew. All of which leads me to believe this is a...ummm...never mind. Possibly a part of a window opening mechanism, either for an automobile or a casement window that could be mounted in an inaccessible location? Or possibly to roll and unroll an awning?
1110 -- This looks like a light duty rolling mill, for shaping something. Most commonly, rolling mills were used for hot metal, but that's clearly not he case here (with wooden rollers). Gauging from the patterns on the rollers, I'd guess this forms some inner piece of leather or similar material for a book spine.
1111 -- Maybe this hook was used to elevate a shaft from a supporting cradle.
1112 -- Ummm....looks like it should be somewhat familiar, but no idea how or what from.
1113 -- Clearly this is a bench-mounted shear, perhaps for cutting lengths of rope at a hardware store. It looks rather light-duty for metal cables, etc. of the diameter it accepts.
1114 -- This is likely a telephone troubleshooting instrument, probably capable of performing a number of tests (line loss, detecting shorts or grounds, etc.) The sliders and meter probably form a Wheatstone bridge for measuring resistances, and the earpiece and transmitter can apparently be switched into the circuit for practical testing.
Now to see what everybody else thinks...
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This answer is correct.
Rob
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1111, used to depress bucket type cam followers on VW Rabbit engine to change shims adjusting valves. used with shim puller, http://www.autotech.com/prod_engine_tools.htm#vat Slightly different tools available for some Ferraris and Alphas.
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Thanks! I did some searching and found the exact same tool as mine.
Rob
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    O.K. Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1109)    Hmm ... it looks like something for driving a drill bit     (of the brace and bit form) upside down. You chuck the tapered     square in the chuck of the brace (or more likely an extension of     some sort) and pop the actual drill in the square hole on the     other side. (I presume that square hole has a similar taper.)
1110)    It looks as though it is designed to roll pleats in cloth.
    If the edges of the discs were sharper, and the grooves in the     other roller were something other than wood, I would consider it     as being intended to slice some wide material into multiple     strips. (And it is interesting that there is some variation in     the spacing between discs.
    It also looks as though the top roller has short threaded     sections to allow adjustment of the position of the discs.
1111)    Looks like the inner curve is pretty consistent, and the back     side has a tang of a narrower width, so I think that it might be     a special tool for disassembling some fairly current object,     perhaps something like removing a fusing roller from a photocopy     machine --- but that is purely a guess.
1112)    Looks like a multiple gauge -- the width of each projection     is for checking and setting some part of a machine (again, like     a photocopy machine).
1113)    Looks like a cable cutter -- perhaps the other half is mounted     on a long wood handle, or perhaps it is mounted on a workbench     devoted to working with the cable in question.
1114)    This looks like a form of a Wheatstone bridge. The four colors     correspond to a choice of four standard resistors accessed     through the sockets and plug.
    The percentage scales are used when an external standard is put     (probably between two of the three binding posts at the right,     with the unknown between the other pair) so you read the     resistance in terms of the percentage of the resistance of the     standard.
    The gal/tel switch allows you to either read zero on the meter     (visible as a needle below the glass eye), or to listen for the     quietest click on the headphone.
    It looks as though it has a buzzer assembly wired through the     hinges (presumably the wires do connect to the hinges, and the     hinges connect to something below the board). That would be     used as the "A.C." setting -- and if the frequency is stable     enough, it could be used for measuring the impedance of     capacitors or inductors, which would be pretty immune to the     "D.C." measurement. Also -- the headphone would be easier to     use in the "A.C." mode.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The owner of this device sent me this response to your observation:
"I took the bottom off and sure enough the wires in the top cover do connect through the hinges to circuits underneath."
I'll post a photo of the open bottom of the box on the answer page.
Rob
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    That was the only thing which seemed to make sense, given what I could see in the photos.

    Thanks!         DoN.
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