What is it? CC

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As mentioned on the site, since five of the six are unidentified, the current set could be my most difficult yet. Wild guesses are welcome as they might lead to a correct answer.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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Just my luck. I finally get first crack at this and I don't know any of them.
B.

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1103: - Magnetic resonance tester? 1104 - Log jack to support logs while sawing? or a pry bar 1105 - 2-cup coffee maker 1106 - Fancy nut cracker (For thos big Texas nuts [everything's bigger in Texas]) 1107 - Meat holder and rib spreader combo. Note the spring on the hanging hook so it won't slide off. could also be a pry bar 1108 - Pry bar - O-rings for not damaging what you are attempting to pry
Dave FL
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1105 If you blow air into it, and it makes a sound like a whistle or siren, then its a whistle or siren.

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On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 15:24:46 GMT, "Alexander Thesoso"

Same for 1107
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More amazing stuff!
Just wild guesses:
1103. Child's rattle. 1104. Used to help lift logs. Attaches to logs with straps. 1105. Device for making tea. The ball grinds the tea leaves. 1106. Squeezes the ends of rivets. 1107. Meat hook. 1108. Air pressure fire starter.
Carl G.
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Wow, a special anniversary posting! Some thoughts and questions:
1103: Does this thing float? The triangular end has a marking in one corner that could be for indicating rotational position.
1104: Could this be used for prying a lid off of something - like some kind of metal barrel opener?
1105: I'm pretty sure this is for spreading a liquid (water or glue?) on a narrow strip of material (like tape or a postage stamp?).
1106: Obviously for crushing or compressing something, Is the shape of the indentations in the "working area" that are not shown the same as the ones that are? Could this be used for forming lead weights? You said you know what this one is...
1107: A tool for levering logs into position? Or something that would hang over a fire and be used to suspend cooking pots?
1108: A complete (well documented) mystery... -- JeffB remove no.spam. to email
R.H. wrote:

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Yes, the shapes are the same in the jaws, a few people got this correct, it's a nutcracker, more specifically, a walnut cracker as answered by Flash. Still no verified answers for the others.
Rob
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Pure guesses, except for 1106
1103 -- A jig for adjusting alignment and suspension, perhaps? I'm assuming, in this case, that a kit for a car means a real full-size car, as opposed to a little plastic model.
1104 -- The two curved ends of the levers may get attached to ones thighs or ankles, allowing a fair bit of leverage at the jaws and leaving both hands free to do something. Presumably there ought to be a strap through each pair of eyelets to buckle it onto the legs. Just what you'd grasp or work in the jaws is not at all clear.
1105 -- ummm....
1106 -- A nutcracker, with shrapnel guard. I think Lehman's hardware (www.lehmans.com) sold a similar model at one point, but they don't seem to carry it anymore.
1107 -- errr....
1180 -- Possibly some manner of vacuum-operated light-duty punch, maybe for embossing some manufactured good or dimpling holes in sheet metal for flush-mount rivets. The channel in the anvil end cold slide along a guide bar or otherwise fit into some positioning mechanism, and a tool fit in the hole the pin comes out of. Applying a vacuum (through what I assume is a hollow handle) forces the pin down against the tool with a somewhat controlled force, and a spring that's missing or a burst of pressurized air would return it for another stroke. I'm not sure why the seals on the outside of the barrel; it may be part of the mounting for the device, to provide some mechanical isolation.
--
Andrew Erickson

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Just a guess, mind you. but 1103 might be some sort of level, where the degree of discrepancy might be different with rotation of the device to any of the three sides of the triangle? (Well, heck, why not?)
and 1106 is prob a nutcracker with terrific leverage, to crack black walnuts carefully so as not to smash the meats.
Flash

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rec.woodworking:

My dad had one of these many years ago. I asked him what it was, and I recall that he said it was a level.
My dad said it, so it's right. Ignore anything you might find in the owner's manual.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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May I revise my opinion on 1106? It is a DEPOTTER SIMPLEX, a machine for making ornamental brass tack-heads for furniture, Grand Rapids, MI, @ 1897- 1903
Flash

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as usual.
    This is a difficult series.
1103)    Pure guess -- something to do with balancing tires?
1104)    ???? Are those leather straps at the unhinged end?
    If not, perhaps they could accept leather straps to secure it     around say the upper legs, allowing the strength of the legs to     assist in holding whatever the hooked end is intended to grasp.     I think that it would be used while seated.
    The curvature of the ends suggests that they would fit the upper     legs, not the lower legs or the arms.
1105)    Perhaps the ball with the grooves is supposed to make a sound when     water inside the container reaches the boiling point -- say for     making tea.
1106)    Perhaps for forming something like cut grass into a pill for     treating something like cattle?
    Or -- it could be for breaking open the shells of nuts like     walnuts or pecans without damaging the nutmeat inside. The     galvanized metal cover would keep the shell and nutmeats from     flying too far away to pick up again.
    Maybe even for just barely cracking the shell of an egg, though     the strength seems excessive for the purpose, and I think that     the cups shown are too small.
1107)    Perhaps for hanging meat while it is cut into pieces for     consumption, curing, or storage?
1108)    The only thing which comes to mind about this one is that the     O-rings on the *outside* must serve some function as well.
    Perhaps there are vents under the rings so they will lift under     pressure from the inside, but will seal when the inside forms a     vacuum.
    Or -- it is intended to fit into some larger structure, with the     O-rings sealing those holes as well. Then the larger structure     could have pressurized gas or steam in it to operate the     pistons.
    I will be particularly interested in learning what this is part     of, and what it is supposed to do
    Note that when either piston is inserted near its full depth (as     limited by the block on the left-hand one, and just as indicated     by the wear patterns on the right hand one) the indicated vent     holes will be sealed away from the inner chamber.
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1103. This is a stud finder. You placed the red end against the wall and hit the wall next to it with the ball of your hand. The balls would rebound differently on a stud versus an unsupported area, although I can't remember exactly what action meant what.
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wrote:

I like this answer, the small bump on the red end could be used to position it correctly on the wall. I also like the idea that it could be a level, I emailed the owner and asked him to try them both to see what he thinks.
Rob
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No.
As far as I can tell each position on the triangle is identical.

Doesn't seem to work very well as one. I don't see much rebound at all (if I hit it any harder then I'll have a nice triangle mark in the wall)
I've always thought it might be a very specific level, but there seems to be no middle indicator on the plastic tube. Why have two balls? Why two of a different size?
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Each position on the triangle is not identical - one has the white plastic bump sticking out.
It is very definitely a stud finder. My father had one - in the box and with directions. I remember reading them, but as it was at least 40 years ago I'm a bit fuzzy on the specifics. Except that you placed it against the wall with the white bump either up or down. You then banged with your hand, and as I recall it was the wall you hit - not the stud finder. Again, I don't recall the specifics. But try hitting the wall instead of the stud finder.
John Martin
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It's worth pointing out that you usually look for studs on the sorts of walls that do bounce slightly when you hit them, rather than brick walls. This is a stud finder, not a wrist-bone finder.
--
Patrick Hamlyn posting from Perth, Western Australia
Windsurfing capital of the Southern Hemisphere
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Just a wild guess, but I think 1104 might be for holding a horses leg bent while you fit a shoe.
You could strap it to the thigh and lock the knee bent. then unlock it and let the horse stand on the leg while you are occupied at the forge.
Paul K. Dickman
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Sounds like an excellent possibility, I'll see what I can find on that.
Rob
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