What is a "zero clearance insert"?


I own a Dewalt DW788 20" variable speed scroll saw. As I continue to practice, I hope to get good enough to do some detailed puzzles.
Anyway, one of the books I'm reading talks about "zero clearance inserts" for more delicate work. I can't find anything in the Dewalt "add ons" that includes a zero clearance insert for the saw.
I did find mention of a zero clearance insert for some other scroll saws - for example, the Delta 40-540 16".
From the looks of what I can see in the picture, the Delta's opening is larger than the Dewalt. I don't envision that there is any sort of insert I can put on the Dewalt.
So anyhow, what IS a zero clearance insert? And does the smaller hole on the Dewalt preclude the need for this insert for more "delicate" work?
Jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

It's an insert that has zero clearance between the sides of the blade and the sides of the slot in the insert. It provides maximum support for thin stock.
ZC inserts aren't typically sold because they're easily made. Saw a slot into a piece of acrylic the same thickness as your existing insert. Trace the outline of the existing insert on it. Cut and sand to fit. If you use blades of different widths, you'll need to make inserts for each of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

A zero clearance insert fits in the hole and comes up snug against the blade to eliminate any clearance. Even a "smaller" hole might need one.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you don't have anything suitable to make a zero clearance insert from, another option is to simply take a piece of tempered masonite about the same size as the scroll saw table, and just saw into it until it's centered over the table. Then do your cutting on top of the masonite. You may have to clamp or doulble-sided-tape the masonite down.
:wq
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You beat me to it Larry........LOL Tony D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<Snip> Yea, but on the dewalt there is no milled out area to set a Z/C insert into, like on a band saw or other scroll saws. What you could do is get you a piece of 1/8" or so plywood and cut it out to the shape of the dewalt table.Drill two tiny holes in it where the blade would pass through, and thread your blade through the hole and open up the slot to the width of your blade. Wipe a few coats of poly on it and paste wax it, then double face tape it to your dewalt table. Hope this makes sense. Thanks, Tony D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's a great idea. I know several people who work with metal and so maybe I could have them make me a thin (1/8" inch should be ample) plate to put on top of the existing table top with just a small hole in it.
But for my current needs, using a cutout of some nice plywood would be just fine. I'll give that a try first.
Thanks again!
Jack
ANTHONY DIODATI wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 23:17:05 -0700, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

I've made my own for the TS. It should be possible for the scroll saw, but I don't see why you'd need it.
Might be OK for the scroll saw, but the zero clearance on the table saw makes all the sawdust go to the top of the table [and into the room], rather than be drawn down under and into my vaccuum system. I'd go for two better preferences: (i) Strong support to avoid bending near the blade, and (ii) absolute flat/square fit to the table top. On the TS, cutting anything so small as to require "zero" clearance" is possibly something you might do with a penknife. The scroll saw shouldn't need that, being not nearly so powerful a tool. But, again, anything that small I'd avoid, and anything large enough is already supported.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's support you're after, not dust collection, that's for sure. Zero clearance makes it a lot less likely that you'll be tempted to reach in and remove a thin piece that wedged. Of course we all _know_ enough to turn things off, it's just that sometimes it looks so easy to just flick it loose....
Oh yes, your clearance is no longer zero after you tilt a couple times.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ever do an scroll saw work? Many materials cut on a scroll saw are thin and flexible enough to bend down into any slot around the blade. A tight insert helps immensely. True "zero clearance" is hardly needed and rarely done. A slot slightly bigger than the blade works fine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The hole in the dewalt table is really small, maybe a half inch wide at most. It might be an issue if you were cutting veneer or something like that, but it's a non issue with the 1/8" stuff I'm cutting on it.
-Leuf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, for my initial practice, I certainly don't need anything smaller than the hole already there. I suppose though that if I were scrolling a puzzle with small pieces, it would certainly help.
Guess who wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.