What is a miter fold?


http://www.sound-insights.com/construction.htm
First I read about a miter fold as it relates to solid surfacing. Then it came up as a term in quilting, and woodworking.
Is this a process that makes for superior looking furniture? Ever done one?
Dave
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David wrote:

Then
done one?

Dave, The third photo shows a good example - the miters (45's) are cut so the grain continues around the corner of the work. Look closely at that photo & notice how the grain carries arond the corner. In quilting it apparently allows the fabric print or design to do the same thing.
HTH - Big John
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oh, NOW I see it! Do you know if they vee the back side, at the edge to prevent creasing?
Dave
Big John wrote:

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If you have a radial arm saw with accurate depth control and a custom V-shaped blade, there's a technique for notching the back of pre-veneered plywood, then folding the whole thing into a tubular box. You cut right through the substrate but don't cut the face veneer. It takes a fair bit of jigging, so it's a production technique more than a one-off. If you remember hi-fi in the '70s, it's how many of those "teak veneer surround and aluminium front panel" cases were made.
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On Sun, 24 Apr 2005 00:01:44 +0100, Andy Dingley

That would be a helluva trick with the radicalalarm saw, and with unconditioned veneer, for that matter.
We do this at work with a CNC machine (Biesse - POS) and with vinyl covered board.
It's a neat trick because the cut must maintain critical depth throughout and the finished surface material must be flexible enough to bend without cracking.
We make a product for hospitals and other healthcare facilities that uses this technique to make wainscot that looks pretty much like real wood to a rube, but the total thickness is about a half inch. Looks like raised panel wainscot but the people can run their carts into it all day long without hurting it.
Some veneered boxes are done this way but the veneer is conditioned before the bend is made.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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