What i learned today

Just feel like rambling a little.
I got myself a couple of Robert Sorby mortising chisels last week and used them tonight to finish up some mortises on an end table that I'm making. Wow! What a big difference it makes using mortising chisels for mortising instead of bevel edge chisels. I finished much quicker than usual and my mortises were nicey nice.
Also hunkered down and figured out how to use my Stanley #90 bullnose to clean up and fit tenons. Again, it made the work go much faster using the right tool.
Thanks for listening,
Kevin B.
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Kevin B wrote:

Don't recall how thick the Sorbys are but Jim Wilson's mortising chisels are THICK and the handles are proportionately beefy. WHEN (not if) you get one stuck in a deep mortise, make sure that neither your chin, lips, nose or forehead (in my case at least a six head, or maybe a ninehead) are in the exit path when you tug that puppy loose. Same is true of pulling apart a tight mortise and tenon.
His mortising chisels warranted making a special box just for them
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/Boxes1.html

The LN rabbet block plane works very nicely too. The Veritas shoulder plane comes in handy as well.

Thanks for posting

charlie b
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I wonder how many of us have "been there, done that." I'm not sure what's worse: the pain from knocking myself in the face/head, or the feeling that I've done something so pathetically stooopid.
Oh well. I guess it's not as dumb as, say, sawing your workmutt in half. :)
--
Jeff Thunder, trolling for you-know-who
Dept. of Mathematical Sciences
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Yes.
My Sorby bevel edged chisels have always been a favorite tool of mine, so I went with the sorbys when I decided that I really ought to give this whole "mortising chisel" think a try.
I love them. Although they are not as hefty Charie B's, I;m very pleased. They have become my close-at-hand, tool that I grab for even little paring jobs.
-Steve

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Yep, it always helps to have the right tool for the job.

If you like the #90, you might want to consider the #92 or even the new LV/Veritas shoulder plane. The #92 has a longer nose-piece which makes it a little easier to get a "running start" (tmBobZ) on the tenon shoulder. I haven't tried the LV tool yet, but it looks like it has a number of useful features. And if it's anything like their other recent forays into planemaking, it's bound to be a keeper.
What's funny is that I used to always use a shoulder plane for the job, but the last tenons I did I simply used a wide chisel to clean up. I guess I'm devolving. :-)
Anyhow, congrats on the neander success.
Chuck Vance
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