What has happened to OSB?

Page 1 of 3  
I put OSB from HD in my shop about 2 years ago. I paid less than $5 per sheet out the door. I went ot buy one sheet and it was almost $18 after taxes. Other wood prices have not tripled. Any ideas.
BTW the OSB is still at HD. I could not see paying that much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The question is more likely: "What the hell happened to government/media reporting on inflation?". Notice the price of steak, paper goods, and just about anything else these days. A woodworking magazine on the newsstand will blow the hell out of a ten dollar bill, while a fraction of a percentage point rise in employment will have the government spokesman and talking heads edging out Scot and Michael.
Odds are the OSB went to Iraq ... so you have to pay more.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 07:54:24 -0600, Swingman wrote:

I too have been told by my local builders that a lot has been shipped to Iraq, dropping supplies here and driving up cost to over $20 a sheet - from a previous price of about $8. They are now putting in foundations for spec houses and stopping there and waiting until prices drop.
Shawn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Inflation? What inflation. The report just out states that wholesale prices dropped showing that our "economic resurgence" is not fanning inflation. Wholesale prices of what, I'm not sure. Plus, I'm noticing that gas prices have plummetted in the last couple days, dropping about 4 cents. I'm sure this is gonna be headlines.
Meanwhile, steak (yowser!), insurance, and all kinds of sundries keep going up, up, up. But, hey, unemployment dropped point one percent and folks are now saying our resurgent economy is gonna reassure a GOP re-election. Yea!
Ah, statistics...
Renata

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 18:08:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@myrealbox.com (Renata) wrote:

And damned outright lies...
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Renata notes:

Unemployment, though, didn't drop in the new applications for unemployment. Not only didn't the expected drop show up, but the rise was considerable.
I love unemployment stats: depending on the state, coverage stops at 26 or 39 or some similar number of weeks, at which point the person unemployed is no longer counted as unemployed.
Charlie Self
"In the final choice a soldier's pack is not so heavy as a prisoner's chains." Dwight D. Eisenhower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 20:23:36 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

And yet, the number of people employed as reported by the BLS has risen by over a million in the last two months. Maybe the labor pool is expanding and the number of new employees relative to the number of new jobless claims means the percentage of unemployeed has dropped.
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Winterburn writes:

Maybe some of those who were dropped from the unemployed lists are getting jobs, now. Maybe. I'll believe it when I see it.
My point is that the figures are manipulated continuously. This is not a critique aimed at the Republicans because it is bipartisan, with the figures getting twisted the same way in each administration.
Until the people attending the figures stop doing things like dropping people from two lists when they are only finished with one, I'll have a hard time believing the figures.
Besides, I was raised when 4% unemployment--essentially using the same methods--was considered full employment. IIRC, today's figures are barely under 6%, yet all the hot shots are ecstatic about "full" employment. We almost might want to take a look at the WalMartization of the employee. This converts the low end of the pay scale from the 8 or so bucks an hour a Kroger grocery worker might make, with benefits, to the $5.30 an hour, without benefits, the employee gets at Walmart when Walmart runs Kroger out of town.
Charlie Self
"In the final choice a soldier's pack is not so heavy as a prisoner's chains." Dwight D. Eisenhower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 00:09:30 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

4% unemployment may have been considered full employment, but it sure wasn't the norm during your or my working lifetime:
ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/lf/aat1.txt
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Winterburn responds:

It did get there, though, and no modern years go there. I started working in 1950, delivering telephone books (otherwise known as my father drove me around with the backseat of the car full of phone books and a hand cart, which I got, IIRC, 3 cents each for delivering...got an extra penny if I picked up the old books, too). The next 3 years were well below 4%, then it bumped above. The point being, it was up and down until some time in the late '50s, then dropped back down in the mid-60s and hung in there for a few years.
It was, I think, an ideal that was aimed at, while today we aimed at 5.9%, which is going to look pretty damned rosy to us in another 10-15 years.
It hasn't been that long since I heard a lot of yuppies in computers and similar arenas sneering at kids who took jobs figuratively or literally "flipping burgers." Shortly, if not already, a bunch of them would be happy to get on at the local Burger King.
Charlie Self
"In the final choice a soldier's pack is not so heavy as a prisoner's chains." Dwight D. Eisenhower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 00:58:28 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

From what I have been reading and seeing on the news, the current administration isn't at all satisfied with 5.9% unemployment and is attempting to reduce the unemployment rate. The facts are that the average US unemployment rate in the last half of the 20th century was 5.7%

computers and

The demographics don't bear that out. Minimum and below wage earners are primarily young, unmarried and uneducated, and other than anecdotal information, I wouldn't expect that to change:
http://www.bls.gov/cps/minwage2002.htm
Of course, there are always those who would like to blame someone else for their situation rather than trying to improve that situation. It ain't always easy, but it is always doable (this through experience which I know you have an abundance).
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 01:42:34 GMT, you wrote:

the claim is made that productivity is up...
take a factory with 10 people working, takes x hours of labor to produce a 'piece' get a new machine in there, that produces 5 times the number of 'pieces' per x hours, fire 8 guys that are no longer needed, and whats the bottom line REPORTED? productivity is up...cause 2 people are now producing the new x per piece labor cost, which is down by 80% over what it was. they IGNORE the unemployed, especially after the long term unemployment is paid out.
--Shiva--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Seems like the same kind of argument was made in pre-industrial revolution England.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'Listen' to the *fine print*. Somewhere after the opening lines they usually state in what specific areas/job groups the increases occurred. Usually it is in the 'Service Industries'. Can you say, "Would you like fries with that?"
Regards and Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {et tu Charlie}

unemployment. Not

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Dec 2003 20:23:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) scribbled

Actually, Charlie, the number of people on unemployment insurance (pogey, David; dole Jeff) has nothing to do with the way unemployment is counted in North America. This is a very common misconception.
Every month, your Bureau of Labour Statistics contacts about 60,000 Murrican households and asks a series of questions about each person. (Actually the Bureau of the Census does the survey and the BLS does the arithmetic). If someone worked at least one hour in the previous week for pay or profit, or in a family business, they are counted as employed. People off work because of sickness, maternity or vacation are also counted as employed. They are counted as unemployed if they were available to take a job and say either that actively looked for work in the previous month or that they are on temporary layoff and expect to be recalled. Just looking at want ads isn't good enough, by "actively looking" the BLS means contacting employers or others with potential leads to jobs. Everybody else is a NILF (Not in the Labour Force).
For everything you always wanted to know about unemployment statistics in the US but were afraid to ask:
http://www.bls.gov/cps/cps_htgm.htm
For us Kanuckistanis, the process is very much the same, except that Statistics Canada interviews about 54,000 households and looking at want ads gets you counted as unemployed. This is one of the reasons why unemployment rates are higher in Canada. For the nitty gritty:
http://www.statcan.ca/english/indepth/71-005/feature/lfhi1998002004s3a.htm
The issue of whether the official statistics undercount unemployment has been hotly debated. My personal view is that they do. But the unemployment rate is not a particularly useful figure, except for political types to bash each other with.
Luigi Who likes to think of himself as a number-crunching storyteller Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
OBWW: For some stats on wreckers and other woodworkers, see Howard Ruttan's web site: http://www.inthewoodshop.org/faq/results.shtml
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Who was it that said, "There are lies, Damn lies, and statistics."
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {who found OSB prices going up BEFORE the Iraq 'situation'. }

SNIP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ron Magen wrote:

Sam Clemens/ Mark Twain.
And I believe he stole it.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
scribbled

Ackshally, he didn't, he attributed it to Disraeli. See my previous post on this:
http://groups.google.com/groups?selm f5bvkb4og9g6htddv1d9hqit16c9ivt1%404ax.com&oe=UTF-8&output=gplain
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm, steak is cheap up here (Canada) <g!>
Ranchers are selling it to "hunters" for $0.25/lb on the hoof.....
Rob
--

Remove CC for email and please visit our web site:
http://www.robswoodworking.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I couldn't resist. What with the economics major and all...
The commodity price for steaks has been going up for quite a while now in the states. This has been largely due a combination of several factors but mostly to the combination of the Mad Cow scare in Canada (Shock to supply) and the "Low Carb" diet craze (Shock to demand). Before these factors kicked in, the cattle ranchers were producing a good supply of beef. Since these shocks, the ranchers haven't been able to keep up. (I guess the cattle just aren't feeling in the mood)
We are only just starting to feel the beef price crunch because the grocery chains have been sheltering us somewhat from this to keep up demand. It gets worse... I have a friend who trades 13 month cattle futures at the merc and it doesn't look like prices are dropping anytime soon.
As for inflation...
Its tough to point to individual items as examples of inflation. Please see the following link for an example on how inflation works:
http://stats.bls.gov/cpi/cpifact5.htm
Considering housing factors in 40%, we should see a trickle affect to inflation if construction supplies continue to rise because of siphoning to Iraq.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.