? what hardwood for window mullions and purlins ?

Hi, I'm designing an old-timey style multi-pane wood window where wooden mullions and purlins have channels to hold panes of glass. For this application the energy efficiency is not important but the durability is. I would prefer a hardwood, not cedar, and a wood that is more resistant to cracking parallel to its grain. (I found that as strong as red oak is, it likes to crack that way.)
What are some low to moderately priced hardwoods that would fit the bill?
Thanks, zeb
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On Jan 29, 6:24 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Ipe is hard and rot resistant and not too too expensive. Different types of "lyptus" are also becoming widely available and are also very good outside. You've also got teak and mahogany that are pretty good, but more expensive. How about white oak? Are these going to be painted? Cypress is a bit tougher than cedar or redwood, and still holds up real well in the weather. I've also read that cherry and even walnut are pretty decent outside, although I've no experience.
I'd look at ipe and lyptus. You might can find decking boards that would suit your needs at a pretty good price. Personally, I'd go with cypress. I built some garden stuff out of it that is as good as day one, and it's outside year round here in upstate New York.
JP
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 15:44:18 -0800 (PST), Jay Pique

cherry. Some were Chestnut, and some were Hickory. Some were white oak. I think some were walnut (black) and I know some were hornbeam (ironwood) Then there were the cedar ones.
We had an elm bush, but I don't think any of the (surviving) rails were elm.
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On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 15:44:18 -0800 (PST), Jay Pique

back.
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