what grits to sue when re-sharpening.

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Hi folks,
After much lurking, and answering a few posts, I've got a question that I have't seen:
I finally got the scary sharp system to work (at least semi-ok). I used the following grits: 100,150,220,320,400,600,800,1200,1500,2000, and some finer stuff, but I don't know the grit. It may be overkill, but I didn't take too long with any of the grits (except for 100 and 150!). Now that the chisel(s) are sharp, I've got a few issues; 1. How do I tell when the chisel is dull (other than it doesn't cut as well - I'm not the most experienced to know). I'm looking for a definitive answer (if there is one) 2. What grits do I start at when resharpening? 3. I played around with a microbevel. At what point do I resurface the chise?
thx in advance,
shelly
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In article <14e607b4-c8c5-4937-9036-
says...

You might just make a strop and with yellowstone (or whatever suits you). A few quick swipes and you're good to go.
S.
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On Mon, 8 Sep 2008 13:40:25 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

If you're cut after sharpening, I would just sue the lot of them. Look for the one with the deep pockets.
Sorry, I just couldn't resist. :~)
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote

Actually, you barely beat me to it! ;)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/18/08
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Idealy you can stop with the grit that literally leaves you with a mirror finish. The mirror finish provides an ultra slick surface that aids in cutting and cuts down on friction.

The way you mentioned and I gently feel the edge with my thumb. If it still sorta scares me I know, well you know, it is scary sharp. It should slice the corner of of a piece of oak with little effort on your part, no hammer or mallot needed.

If you have nicks you obviousely need to use a more coarse grit but if you simply need to retouch try the most fine and see how it works out for you . You will develope a sense of which to use based on the condition of the blade.

I typically can redo the microbevel 10 or so times before needing to regrind. The microbevel eventually becomes too blunt and cutting will suffer. Dont let the chisel get too dull between sharpenings. Depending on how often you redo the microbevel will determine how many you can get away with before a regrind.

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got them that good! I can also shave hairs, although I notice a slight skin scrape after (duh!)

good info thx

shelly
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I recall when I was at school, many, many moons ago, the woodwork teacher used to show how he could shave his forearm (dry, with no effort) with a chisel or plane iron after he had sharpened it
--
Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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On Sep 8, 4:40pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

You can inpsect it under magnification if you want. (Do this b4 use too, so you'll have something to compare). But I just wait until it's not performing as I'd like it. A quick test is to lightly push the edge into your fingernail at about a 45d angle. If it "sticks" then it's still really sharp. If it skates, not so much.

For the lapping of the back you always use the highest grit to which you initially lapped it. (I take mine to 2000 on paper). If you haven't really nicked the blade or really dulled it you can just retouch the microbevel with 2000 a few times. Once you have to rehone the primary bevel, I'd drop back to 400 to start. Maybe lower if it feels like it's taking forever.

It's a bit of a personal preference, but I pretty much just hone the microbevel with my highest grit, and when it gets to be taking "too long" to sharpen it that way, or it gets to be say 3-4mm wide I rehone the primary.
Once you get comfortable with using paper, you should give waterstones a try. I still do my initial lapping on paper, but now I use Norton stones and finish with a Shapton 12,000 grit. Very, very sharp, and they seem to stay sharp for longer.
JP
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I looked at the sharpening process after every grit with a 10x loupe... it was fascinating - I could really see the wire edge, and even little bits of steel getting smaller and smaller

I didn't go ll the way. Is it a big deal? I guess I can wiat intul I have to resharpen.

<rant on> sigh.... had several abortive attempts before the current success... I used the verita MKII guide (a nice piece of equipment, that). I told myself that if I still couldn't sharpen, I would get the work sharp system. Now you tell me that I should go for waterstones. Just tell me, does it ever end :) <rant off>
what grit stones do you use?
thanks again
shelly

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I've been watching this "sharpening" thread with more than casual interest. I've been hoping someone would suggest a *minimum* assortment of grits for sharpening. I would like to use the scary sharp system but I'm not ready to spend on an assortment of grits what I could spend a mechanical system. So...........how "few" grits could I get by with and still get the job done?
Max
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based on what I've read and done, the point is to not skip grits. Each grit has to remove the scratches from the previous one, so if you go from, say, 220 to 400, you have to work harder with the 400, then with 220, 320, and then 400.. If you had too, I would guess that you could skip almost every other grit: 100, 220, 400, 800, 1200, 2000
shelly
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It's theoretically possible to just use the finest grit to which you wish to sharpen. It'll just take a while, especially if you're lapping the back of a cheap chisel for the first time. I think you could get by with 220, 400, 1000 and 2000. You'll want the most of 220 though. Paper goes quick in the bigger grits.
JP
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wrote:

It's theoretically possible to just use the finest grit to which you wish to sharpen. It'll just take a while, especially if you're lapping the back of a cheap chisel for the first time. I think you could get by with 220, 400, 1000 and 2000. You'll want the most of 220 though. Paper goes quick in the bigger grits.
JP
I hear you on the theory. If I use a grinder to take out any nicks (which I currently do) I should be able to manage with the grits you mention. I use plenty of 220 and buy it in packs. I have 400 and 600 (wet or dry) for auto work so that's no problem. So if I buy some 1000 and 2000, I should be able to manage with that. Much thanks.
Max
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"Max" wrote:

SFWIW:
Got a piece of glass plate about 12x12x1/2 (Actually two 1/4 plates glued together), a can of 77 spray adhesive and a few sheets of wet/dry paper, 100 thru 2000 grit.
Cut strips about 2" wide x 8"-9" long
Chisels are sharp and still working on first purchase of W/D.
Lew
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I have a piece of glass 3/4" thick; its about 14 X 16. It came from a table top (30" X 44") that got broke. It's interesting to learn that I need only a *few* sheets of W/D. I'll give it a go.
Max
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Originally I tried using strips about 5"x 2"... they weren't long enough. Now I use 2" strips, the length of the sheet.
I use either a glass plate (came from rockler w/sanspaper) or a marble(maybe) tile from an oddlot place. the tile cost me $3, and was pretty flat. I hook the end of sandpaper over it, use the other hand to hold the end down, and hone away. I use the glass plate got the finer grits. It is true that you don't use too much of the finer grits. I also use a sandpaper cleaning stick - it makes a big difference.
shelly
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I'm a lawyer; I've never seen a grit sued yet.
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Thought about it a couple of times, but then I tried cheese grits and they are not so bad. I figured all grits should not suffer because of the icky taste of a few.
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When you suddenly spin around in your shop and "you don't split an atom" while holding your chisel.
Here is additional info on grits:
http://www.quakergrits.com/QG_Products/products.htm
http://woodworkstuff.net/scary.html
snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

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This is precisely what's wrong with this country today.
If you are not getting the results you want, it is not the fault of the grits themselves and you have no business suing them.
;-)
--
FF

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