What Glue For Veneer?

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I've repaired small veneer chips/missing pieces, using Titebond II, successfully. I now have a old dresser project with 2 drawers missing the veneer on their faces.
What type of glue is appropriate for larger sheets of veneer application? I don't think typical yellow glue is the appropriate glue. The drawer faces measure 42"W X 8"H. Base wood is solid maple and the veneer will be mahogany.
Thanks. Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Hide glue Contact cement Yellow glue White glue
--

dadiOH
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"Sonny" wrote in message
I've repaired small veneer chips/missing pieces, using Titebond II, successfully. I now have a old dresser project with 2 drawers missing the veneer on their faces.
What type of glue is appropriate for larger sheets of veneer application? I don't think typical yellow glue is the appropriate glue. The drawer faces measure 42"W X 8"H. Base wood is solid maple and the veneer will be mahogany.
Thanks. Sonny
===========It takes a "bond on contact" type cement for larger veneer areas due to not being able to keep all areas of the surface tight at the same time, while the glue is hardening.
Typical wood glues will not perform well unless you have a press with appropriate surface and a few thousand pound of pressure, similar to a photographer's picture press.
Contact cement or equivalent.
--
Eric


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On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 17:11:08 -0400, Eric wrote:

You've never done hammer veneering with hide glue?
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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"Larry Blanchard" wrote in message
On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 17:11:08 -0400, Eric wrote:

You've never done hammer veneering with hide glue?
======= No I haven't. I am not familiar with that product.
I would assume it is an adhesive for leather and stays flexible, like contact cement, to work in that application.
Different meanings for the word "hide". LOL
--
Eric


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..
Cures hard and brittle, not flexible. That's part of the reason it's used for instrument construction. Better sound transmission, and necks or other parts under constant tension won't bow or move and take a permanent set from glue creep.
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On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 21:51:19 -0400, Eric wrote:

Well, no. It is brittle and does not creep under load, like PVA does. It is used for veneering and for musical instrument making. Museum conservators strongly suggest that anything you make that might become a "heirloom" be assembled with hide glue because it is reversible.
Also, since it is a protein, glue soaking through a thin veneer does not create an ugly blotch that won't take dye or stain.
I could go on, but it's easier to point you to:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_glue
Try it - even if only the liquid stuff that doesn't require heat.
--
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Yeah, I was surprised at how nicely it worked. Not gonna replace Titebond with it unless I develop some production volume at some point but it's not bad.
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Hide glue is, as the name implies, made from animal hides.

No, it is a stiff glue, ideal for veneering. Long open time. Doesn't require great pressures.
DAGS "Veneer Hammering" for more information.
scott
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On Sat, 1 Oct 2011 23:24:56 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

Why would anyone ever wish to veneer a hammer, LB? <groan>
-- It takes as much energy to wish as to plan. --Eleanor Roosevelt
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Hot hide glue. You can apply the veneer with a "hammer" while it's still liquid, or you can apply glue to the veneer and substrate, let dry, then iron on the veneer with a clothes iron set to 140 - 150 degrees.
That same iron can be clamped upside and used like a hot plate to heat the glue in a soup can if you don't have a "proper" (i.e. $150) glue pot. Other way is to mix the glue, let it sit for an hour, then nuke it in a microwave for 30 seconds to a minute, until a cooking thermometer reads 140 - 150 F (higher temps degrade collagen).
Unflavored Knox gelatin is very similar to horse glue and handles the same. Dunno if it's useful for veneering, but I tested it with a couple of blocks of scrap, and the joint couldn't be split with a hammer.
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On 10/1/11 8:52 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Or just buy the synthetic stuff in a plastic bottle.
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Liquid hide glue? Made viable at room temp by addition of urea, with only a negligible strength tradeoff _if_ it's fresh. It's worthless after six months past packaging date.
The hot glue I'm using now is from 30 year old stock, and it's as good as new. Holds wood like it was welded.
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On 10/1/11 9:09 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

And it's soooooo easy to use.
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It's only slow to set up the pot. I cheat, and preheat the water and glue in the microwave. Once the pot is up to working temperature, however, you can get a lot of gluing done very fast (you pretty much have to). Apply glue, rub and hold pieces together for a minute, proceed to the next joint. Nice not to have your entire production slowed and bottlenecked by not having enough clamps.
This demo makes superglue look slower than January molasses:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21sL6XLM02Y

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wrote:

Great! You've got me convinced. Now where are the best materials/prices?
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Best regards
Han
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In article <7ab539a2-7bd3-48e4-b043-3d88c3289db5

It's very convenient though before it expires. I just wish that the local hardware store would keep their stock current--they have it in small sizes but the stock on the shelf is about two years out of date. Woodcraft has it fresh but only in big bottles that I won't use up before it expires.

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I viewed several of the YouTube videos for application. I can't tell if any of those veneers had PSA backing (I don't think so), paper backing or if the veneer was raw (no backing). The videos didn't mention whether the veneer was backed with anything. I ordered the paper backed veneer - http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000687/18051/Mahogany-Quartersawn-4-x-8-Veneer-Sheet-10MIL-Paper-Backed.aspx#ShippingBilling
Does using paper backed not matter, as to what gluing technique is used, i.e., hide glue, contact cement, yellow or white glue? The WoodCraft's site, for another paper backed veneer, recommended using contact cement or cold press glue for the paper backed veneer. I thought I might try the yellow glue technique, using titebond II or Titebond III, since I have these on hand.
Sonny
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If hide glue is the best approach, I'll order the appropriate tools, though I would rarely use them, later. I wouldn't mind learning how to do the hammered technique. This project is not that special, so learning on this piece (circa about 1940s, I suppose) would be favorable.
Sonny
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On Sun, 02 Oct 2011 07:38:27 -0700, Sonny wrote:

I could be wrong, but I thought the paper backed stuff was designed to use with contact cement.
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