What glue do you use when you need a longer setup time?

I haven't had much luck with a google search of this topic so I thought I would ask this very helpful group.
I have a kind of complicated book case to put together with horizontal and vertical pieces so I'd like to give myself some more time with a longer setup glue without going for the longer setup but messy Gorilla glue. I have seen some references to Tightbond Extend but I also read some negatives on this glue. What would you suggest?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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We use TB Extend in the shop whenever extra time is needed. Its white not yellow but other than that and staying open longer I've never precieved any difference.
If you can find any literature from Titebond regarding performance differences I would consider the data 100% reliable. They usually have very good data sheets on their products.
I think TB III also stays open longer and it is brown not yellow.
Only thing i don't know off hand is the water resistance of Extend vs TB II or III.
Dick Snyder wrote:

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Dick Snyder wrote:
<snip>
> I have a kind of complicated book case to put together with horizontal and > vertical pieces so I'd like to give myself some more time with a longer > setup glue without going for the longer setup but messy Gorilla glue.
<snip>
Epoxy with a slow hardener.
Lew
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For my rocketry work, I use a two-part epoxy (west systems, 12hr) when I need a glue that won't stick right away (cardboard is notorious for speeding up yellow glue's set time) and won't swell the wood or cardboard. Not sure it's right for woodworking, but that's what I use.
It gives me about 20 minutes working time.
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 20:33:24 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

I like Gorilla for that, but it seems you don't. Epoxy is my other choice.
I can't say about Titebond extend, haven't tried it yet.
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Dick Snyder wrote:

when I have a complicated assembly I first try to divide up the assembly into parts I can do in several gluings. for instance, make spacer blocks to keep one end of the shelves spaced right while you glue and square the other side.
the ultimate long open time glue is hide glue.
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I use Gorilla glue when I need a longer open time - as long as I don't use too much, and watch it to wipe up any foam-out while it's still soft, I haven't had problems with messiness. Looking forward to trying TBIII, though - as soon as I finish off my current bottle of TBII. Andy
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I have used Gorilla glue and still do. I found that the holding strength is not as good on wood as epoxy or TP II or Lepage's equivalent. What to you think?

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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote: > I have used Gorilla glue and still do. > I found that the holding strength is not as good on wood as epoxy or TP II > or Lepage's equivalent. What to you think? <snip>
VERY MUCH OVERPRICED AND UNDER PECKERED.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca says...

Hmmm. I use 'gorilla grip' (clear, comes in goo-gun cartridges) and not the 'gorilla glue' they sell here in bottles(foams up red). Bit of a special case because if I need strength, I often work in gum (eucalypt spp) and epoxy is quite unsatisfactory with those and often just let's go the wood, urea- formaldehyde is MUCH stronger.
About 20 mins open time.
If I need more, I work at night when it's cool, I can get about 25-30 mins open time out of aliphatic ... and I get SWMBO in to pass things and hold up what shouldn't fall down. She's starting to pick up on things, too, built herself a wooden tumbler 6' long by 2'4" diameter for her felt-making :-)
-Peter
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Peter Huebner wrote:
> ... because if I need strength, I often work in gum (eucalypt spp) and epoxy is > quite unsatisfactory with those and often just let's go the wood, urea- > formaldehyde is MUCH stronger.
Next time mix some epoxy, then thicken with microballoons and apply with a popsicle stick.
Clamp until set.
Think you will be pleased with the results.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Especially the liquid stuff. It's not quite as strong as the hot pot variety, but it's still stronger than the wood.
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Dick Snyder wrote:

Titebond Extend or 30+ minute epoxy, depending on the use of the item.
What negatives have you read about Extend?
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I got my info on Titebond Extend from the Sept 2004 issue of Wood magazine that did some study on glue. They gave it an "F" for water resistance (shouldn't be an issue for my project I hope) and low marks for end grain to end grain gluing (I don't plan to do it on this project) and they commented that you really need to stay clamped up for quite awhile. None of these are killers for my particular project.

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On Fri, 17 Nov 2006 08:42:12 -0500, Dick Snyder wrote:

I don't see these as "negatives", they're characteristics of the kind of glue it is. If they gave any glue "high marks" for end grain I'd be interested in knowing what--end grain is notoriously difficult to glue reliably and much of the art of joinery was developed to avoid this necessity. "White" glues (the family to which most Titebond products belong) in general have low water resistance--Titebond has managed to improve it a great deal in some of their products but for any use that involves regular wetting that class of glue is the wrong choice. As for having to stay clamped up for "quite a while", well what do you expect? The trade-off for long open time is long clamping time.

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It was never meant to be waterproof. Extend is a bit thinner than the regular stuff so it soaks into end grain. Preglueing solves that. As far as clamping time, it stands to reason that a glue formulated to dry slower would need to be clamped longer. Sounds like the article is saying that the glue performs the way it was intended.

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"Dick Snyder" wrote in message

IME, a plastic resin, like "Weldwood" is a good choice for long open times.
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Swingman wrote:

That gets my vote. And when it sets up, I would put it against just about anything. And it is great for outdoor stuff, too. When I repair a cabinet or split door jamb, something that needs to be set "just perfect" this stuff lets you put plenty of clamps on before it starts to set. It is a great tool, and I wouldn't be surprised if it held as well as TBII. The only drawback for everyday use is its cost.
Robert
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Seems to work fine. I suspect it just has a bit more water.
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|I haven't had much luck with a google search of this topic so I thought I | would ask this very helpful group. | | I have a kind of complicated book case to put together with horizontal and | vertical pieces so I'd like to give myself some more time with a longer | setup glue without going for the longer setup but messy Gorilla glue. I have | seen some references to Tightbond Extend but I also read some negatives on | this glue. What would you suggest? |
I know that everybody else is telling you to use some high-tech product like epoxy or a PVC-based glue but for long setup times and good wood joints, I've found that nothing much beats old-fashioned hide glue.
Norm
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