What glue do we like now?

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that's where the difference is really. otherwise it does not matter. but that's why I use it as I use lots of oily woods. otherwise I would not use it. though for what I do it is nice to only have to glue one side.
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It works at lower temperatures than I or II.
It doesn't run as much as II or I.
I know nothing about the GW202.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

I've been enjoying the increased open time of the III. Makes assemblies just a bit less harried when joints that fit a few minutes ago no longer seem to and clamping blocks mysteriously vanish (does that happen to anyone else??). It dries to a darker color than I or II, for what that's worth. I don't use enough over the course of a year for the slightly higher price to make much difference. Can't compare either to the GW202.
Roger
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Yellow Elmhers
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TBIII works fine, I use it on darker color woods. TBII still going strong.
Although, I've been using Gorilla glue more often, longer open time, good for bent laminations or where waterproofing is required. Sometimes, its just closer.
I don't think there is a bad brand of yellow glue.
Dave

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While people are thinking about the "newest glue" how do you repair a joint "in a few years"?
I was looking at one of the FW books - and a maker of "fine furniture" suggested that hide glue was still the best if you wanted to plan ahead for the "inevitable repairs".
I know that hide glue is still preferred by instrument makers since repairs are assumed to be necessary and an issue in expensive guitars, violins etc. Then it is a matter of heating the joint (since hide glue melts when heated), disassembly, doing the repair and then applying more hide glue -- since the new hide glue should dissolve the old hide glue and form a decent bond as they merge.
My understanding is that modern glues may necessitate paring down the old joint (to get rid of the old glue since it seals the wood) , adding wood back and then reglueing...
Any thoughts on this issue?
toller wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@SPAMsimpering.ca says...

furniture" I've built. I've got the gluepot and the beads for the hot version, but I've never needed enough at one time to go through the hassle.
Now I'm designing an entertainment center and aquarium stand) for our living room. Will I use hide glue? I don't know. While I hope to attain a high level of workmanship, I suspect entertainment centers will not be a hot item on the future antique circuit. OTOH, who woulda' thunk that anyone would collect old iceboxes?
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ER doc found the Rival Express Hot Pot with variable heat knob worked as a hot hide glue pot. For $15.00 or so compared to $85.00 or so I found it works as he said it would.
On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 20:41:47 -0800, Larry Blanchard

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net says...

$85 glue pot :-).
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 08:47:14 -0800, nospambob wrote:

I found a 1.5Qt hotpot at Target for $6.99. neener.
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I've used titebond ii, elmers, and ol' yeller. They all do the job I assigned them. No complaints. Hope this helps. Joe
toller wrote:

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toller wrote:

Don't have a clue.
Use two (2) different adhesives in the old boat yard.
TiteBond II which is about $13-$14/gallon @ Home Depot for wood projects and epoxy which considerably more for boat projects.
They both do a fine job.
HTH
Lew
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I use titebond II - just because it was on sale.
I think any type of yellow glue will serve you well for interior applications. I use poly for outdoors.
Buy a gallon instead of a quart - it lasts quite a long time. I just emptied my gallon of TB today and it was just as juicy as when I bought it over a year ago.
Lou
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Fresh glue, stored well. Old glue is bad glue.
Hide glue.
Hot hide glue for veneering
Hot hide glue for big glue-ups on "proper" work and carcase assembly.
Cold hide glue (Titebond) for "quick fixes".
Cheap builder's PVA for plywood, biscuits (diluted) and rough stuff.
Some Titebond garbage with no shelf life that turned into chewing gum and won't be getting replaced.
Poly when I hate the world and want to build softwood garbage with huge gaps.
Epoxy for almost everything. Great vats of the stuff, and a shelf full of fillers, pigments and potions for tweaking it.
Rabbit skin glue for when hide glue isn't flexible. Also goes into gesso, compo, gilding and bookbinding.
Rice paste for Japanese woodworking that needs to be dismantled in the future (sword scabbards). Take yesterday's leftover rice and mush it with a bit of water.
Rice starch paste for paper conservation. A pig to brew up carefully.
Wallpaper paste for lots of paper-based stuff.
Five hundred different technical things for sticking glass, brass and unobtainium.
Welding ! 8-)
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WEST for water proof applications, laminations. Cyanoacrylate for small mitres. Elmers, TB, LePage, any of those quality yellows for anything else wood. ('Cept teak..WEST) Different job, different glue. I use a lot of 3-M polygun hotmelt..LOL
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This winter I'm using Titebond III mostly because my basement is in the low 50s. I also use 15 and 5 minute epoxies, Gorilla glue, super glue, "standard" yellow carpenter's glue, glue sticks, double-face tape, spray adhesive, and GOOP to name a few.
Depends on what the end result is supposed to be. I made some squirrel and bird feeders and mailbox covers and use Gorilla glue for them because it's waterproof.
I used epoxy to fill some sloppy joints I made and when I'm gluing metals. Also for loose knots. Mixed with some sawdust, it also makes a strong putty for dings and miscues.
Superglue also comes in handy to lock knots and some wood splits. I also use to strengthen soft wood and to fix in screws.

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Wed, Mar 2, 2005, 8:21pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (toller) claims: I just used up my quart of glue, and it is time to buy some more. I have like the GarrettWade 202, but have not tried Titebond III. Is it worth a try, or do I stick with 202?
Does this mean you can't make your own decision about what glue to buy?
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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WOOD magazine did a highly scientific study on this a few issues ago. Oh, and be sure and pick up the next months issue where they retract their findings.
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toller wrote:

Personally, I favor a glue that sticks wood together.
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