What electrical for 240v equipment?

I expect to be buying a new saw and maybe a dust collector in a couple months. Since I have about maxed out my two circuits in the shop already, I will be putting in a new 240v line. Since I have some free time now, I would like to get on it.
Presumably a 20a circuit will be adequate for a contractor saw and a small DC (7 or 8 amps each?) but do they need a neutral? I have a big coil of 12/2 and I would prefer to use it up instead of buying 12/3, but will obviously get what the equipment requires. And what is the outlet, the one with the two blades going the wrong way (6-20R)?
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Wade

Go to HD and get a 125 Amp panel. Connect it to a 60 Amp breaker in the house panel. Run 3 # 6 and a bare copper ground between the panels. Drive a ground rod/stake at the new panel and connect it to the ground buss in the new panel. Then you will be sitting fat for electrical for a long time. Bob AZ
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house
ground
panel.
I did think about running 10/3 over so that I can add a couple 120v outlets also, but decided I didn't need it (or even have room for the equipment). I sure don't need a 125a box!
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There should NOT be two ground rods connected at different locations in the electrical system. There may be more than one ground rod but they all should be connected to the system at one point -- at the entrance panel.

house
ground
panel.
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house
ground
panel.
Damn, I hate when people give electrical advice that is against code, and possibly dangerous.
Better off contacting an electrician, stopping by and giving him 20 bucks to give you real advise, than take what you learn here at face value.
Basically, Bob, no. That is not the proper way to do it.
Original poster, yes, 12 2 with ground will be fine, but don't use it for 220 and 110 at the same time, or on the same circuit.
--
Jim in NC



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"Wade Lippman" wrote in message

Nope, no neutral is necessary for a dedicated 240v for most shop tools ... 12/2 w/ground is what you want and will work fine for a 20A 240v dedicated circuit. Just tag the white wire at the panel and the receptacle with black tape to indicate that it is hot.
NOTE: You might want bigger wire and a 30-40A circuit for your dust collector ... check that out before you go pulling wire.

one
That's what you want for 20A:
http://www.networkcable.com/pages/components/nema_nonlocking.html
--
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Last update: 9/21/03
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A loaded saw will blow the 20A breaker quickly with the DC running on the same circuit. Two runs is almost no more throuble than one!! WL

I
one
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He said he's running a contractor's saw, not a 3 hp cabinet saw. Assuming his DC is in the same league as the contractor's saw, a 20 amp circuit should carry it.
Bob

already,
small
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