What does sliding Miter Saw do over a non sliding saw

Page 1 of 4  
I have a chance to buy a 12" sliding DeWalt Miter Saw with a rollaway table with wheels etc for 350.- I'm just wondering if I need the sliding feature or not.......>Any help will be appreciated
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In a nutshell, crosscuts a greater width than a non sliding miter saw .. usually up to about 12", depending upon blade size.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Swingman........It has a 12" saw blade. It will not move as I'm cutting right? I just pull it out before I cut, and that then it will let me cut like the 12". Is that correct? Don't laugh, I'm not experienced with this. How does the price sound?.....Peter

..
rollaway
sliding
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PeterM wrote:

You start the cut with the head pushed to the back of the saw and pull the head through the cut.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Nova, wow, I had no idea that this was the way to do it. Now I know............ Can you tell me if you think the price is OK......Peter

I'm
will
the
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PeterM wrote:

The current price for a new DeWalt DW708 12" sliding miter saw is $600 (without the stand). Provided there is nothing wrong with the saw, $350 with a stand is a VERY good price. The DW708 is an excellent miter saw.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nova wrote:

I thought it was the other way around. Pull all the way out, put into the wood, push forward. It's based not on personal experience but something I read somewhere about a sliding miter being safer than a radial arm saw.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark,
for safety reasons, I suggest you never make a cut by 'pushing' the slider. The blade can (and will) lift the leading edge of the wood off the saw plate unless it is clamped down, the probable result being a kickback as the blade jams in the wood. It will also give much greater tearout as the blade is egressing into the air instead of down into the table.
By pulling the saw, the blade pushes the wood down into the table and fence at the same time, assisting with a stable, safe, cut.
regards,
Greg

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark,
I can see that others in this thread have different opinions to mine. Given that, you should read the manual I guess, as I will tomorrow.
cheers,
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What was the question????
As far as the saw cutting wavy ?
News flash: Any saw will cut poorly if you don't run it at it's 'natural rhythm'.
Everything has a speed which it wants to happen. Everything. Exceed this speed and it's going to screw up.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
actually you're supposed to pull the head out before beginning the cut, and push the blade as you make the cut. on a radial arm saw you pull it through as you make the cut. If you pull the blade through the cut on a sliding miter saw, you're asking for the workpiece to be thrown at you. On a SCMS the blade is spinning upwards closest to the operator, whereas on a RAS it is spinning downwards at this point. It's a big difference and shouldn't be mixed up.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike in Mystic wrote...

Whaaat??! Not on mine, it doesn't, nor on any I've ever seen. I wouldn't buy a miter saw that kicked the dust straight from the kerf into my face... BTW, I have a DW708. What do you have?
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You're right - I'm not sure what I was thinking. I was trying to visualize the difference in my mind, and didn't think it through too well.
I do know that there is a risk of kickback from the SCMS if you pull it through a cut, vs. push it through the cut. This isn't true of the RAS.
--
There are no stupid questions.
There are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
O

you have that backwards you start with the head pulled out drop it into the wood and push backwards. the other way is a radial arm saw.
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
it's not as accurate for precision cuts as a non slider. the blade and motor will will have some lateral slop, in relation to the wood and table. I quit using my non-slider for super precise cross-cuts. I made a sled and use the TS for accurate cross-cuts. Like to within .005 or better.
Note: The published maximum width you can cut a flat board on a non slider can be exceeded. Just put a board under your wide work piece; that will place the workplace at a wider section of the blade. Look at a miter saw to visualize this.
dave
PeterM wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the DW 12" non-slider so don't know much about the slider. But doesn't the slider also have a blade height stop so it acts kinda like a RAS if you want to cut rough dados? Other than that, I can imagine it also has the drawbacks of the RAS in terms of a little more flex and a few more adjustments to make to keep it perfectly tuned. As for the price, either lying, got a great deal or is something wrong with it!!! I believe it retails for over $600 new (maybe closer to $700 but I can't remember).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Now I'm confused, are you saying the sliding one is not as accurate? Then I won't buy it.......Peter

and
made
at
rollaway
sliding
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PeterM wrote:

You got to keep in mind Dave's the type of guy that forgets little details, like remembering to put bottoms in the drawers he makes.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Kohlman wrote:

You made me pull out the manual for my saw. I've been pulling the blade through the cut since I had the saw. The manual tells me I've been doing it wrong. You are correct the proper way is to push the saw through the cut.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nova wrote:

When I had my Delta Sawbuck it was pull through the cut. When I went to the SCMS it was push through the cut..I use both methods, depending on the cut I'm making at the time (i.e.- where am I willing to tolerate minor splintering if it should occur in the finished cut). If it's just standard trim or similar sized stock I just do the typical "chop" through.
Never had an accuracy problem with the SCMS, it's properly adjusted and I don't try to horse the thing through the cut.
Scott
--
An unkind remark is like a killing frost. No matter how much it warms
up later, the damage remains.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.