What do you use to flick distressing marks onto projects?

I've used a toothbrush and find it takes more time and "flicks" then I have patience for. I use model paints (enamel) because the consistency is perfect and the spots don't spread out like stains. There has to be a better way to fling small specks QUICKLY. I don't want large splotches, so I've not tried any larger brush.
dave
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Hey Dave, back when I built sets for the film industry, I would see the scenic artists doing specks using a paint brush with rather long bristles, after dipping the tips of the brush in paint, they would hold the brush in one hand and strike the other hand flicking the paint off the bristles. It seemed that the viscosity of the paint was the secret. For really large areas, they would put the paint into a Hudson sprayer, hook that to the suction line of a paint gun, pump up the pressure and use a very low atomizing pressure to the gun, hence droplets.
Thanks for the green tint tip.
Ed Angell

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Ed Angell wrote:

Ed, thanks for the suggestion. Hope the green tint gets you the color you need.
I've taken to mixing all my own water based dye stains this year instead of relying on solvent based pigmented stains. I use mostly oak and find that the contrast between the early and late wood is more than I prefer. I picked up some Transtint dye (liquid) and some dye powders, including basic colors like yellow, ruby red, and green so that I can modify the stains to my heart's content. I just refinished a 100+ year old chest for SWMBO that turned out to everyone's delight, by mixing and re-mixing until I got that "golden hue" I had in my mind's eye. The only PITA I find is that deep pores don't take too kindly to water based dyes, even with a bit of surfactant added.
dave
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If you do a lot of work that require small specks, I'll bet you could modify one of those cheapo touch up airbrushes that have the small glass jar. Remove the jar and feed pressurized paint to the gun directly. I believe that the airbrush would give you the small specks you need. Keep the atomizing air very low and you should have excellant control over the product.
Ed Angell
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Ed Angell wrote:

that's an idea, Ed. I have a Paasche air brush. maybe it would do a splatter like you said, if I play around with the pressure. thanks!
dave
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modify
believe
my aztex airbrush has a specific nozzle to produce spatters. i'd bet that yours does also.
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Charles Spitzer wrote:

I'm not sure if they do. I have the numbers 1, 3 and 5 tips and just went online to see if they make any others. no luck. I try with what I've got and see what happens.
dave
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Bay Area Dave wrote:
I try with what

My fingers can't keep up with my brain.
dave
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