What do you take to test lumber at lumber yard

I thought I would put together a kit of things to take to the lumber yard to test wood that I am interested in.
I wondered what others have found useful.
I have
a moisture meter tape measure (probably should have at least a 12 ft tape, but the one I have in the kit now is just 6 ft. plane. Spray bottle of water?
Other ideas???
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All I bring is a tape measure and CHALK. I like to chalk out my cuts so I don't end up shorting myself or buying too much. I don't measure moisture. Never had any problems with moisture probably because I only buy lumber from lumberyards that kiln dry.
--
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Agree with garage. If you want to check grain forget the water. They may not like it. I use odorless mineral spirits.Which they also might not like.Depends.I have never had much of a problem with wood grain or color....of course I'm lucky and have an excellent supplier.

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I take a pad & pencil, a 12' tape measure, a small calculator, and a small moisture meter. Sometimes I take a 12" straight edge for checking flatness of wide boards, but I usually just use the edge of the tape measure for this. When buying rough sawn lumber I usually also try to take a pocket sized Surform file to spot clean some small areas so I can see the grain, but if I'm really looking for pleasing grain structure I will usually buy S3S lumber, as it's easier to see the grain that way and I can select 1 board at a time from the pile. My source for rough sawn isn't much interested in selling less than 200 or 300 BF at a time so I usually only buy from him if I need a large amount at one time, but his prices are low enough and his quality good enough that I have never felt like I have gotten a bad deal.
I don't think any dealer would much appreciate anyone spraying water on their kiln dried lumber. With experience, this shouldn't be necessary anyway.
Charley
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A cut list. Art

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I can tell by lookin if it is lumber, No Test Equipment Required. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote

Yeah ... those fiber cement boards just don't feel right! :)
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Last update: 9/30/07
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wrote:

I bring:
- 16 ft. tape (lives in the truck) - Apron plane (only on special occasion) - Leather gloves (lives in the truck) (I buy rough) - Money (Makes carting the wood away easier)
I've never seen the need to test the moisture at my suppliers. A 16 foot tape can be run all the way out, so rough cuts can be marked without moving the tape. I don't normally cut at the supplier, unless it's raining and I need to get long material inside my enclosed trailer.
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eganders wrote:

If you're buying for specifics, a small block plane and flashlight...
I rarely buy by the board but in 300-400 bd-ft, so my excursions basically are -- call, place order (300-ft #1C 4/4 qs wh oak); go, load; grit teeth, pay; return home, unload/stack; let sit.
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I usually just take my good eye and a tape. --dave

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if you by tropical woods then a moisture meter is important. cocobolo and ebony and any oily wood it is best to check and make sure. it tends to pass through so quick it can be 5 to 10% too high in moisture.
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My first suggestion is to ask for the location's policies before planing or spraying liquid on any lumber.
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