What do you guys think of "shaving" with a TS?


I need to take about the width of my kerf from a 3' 1x4" piece of maple. I don't have a jointer, so I thought the TS was my next best option. I had the fence all lined up and a featherboard in place, but then remembered reading that ripping very thin slices with a TS is unsafe. A friend that does woodwork thought it would be ok.
Another thought was to just sand it off, but I think it would take a while to get an accurate, straight edge. I just bought a router also, but I have very little experience with it.
What would be a reasonably safe way to cut the wood accurately?
-Steve
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There's probably all sorts of theoretical reasons why loading the blade in an asymmetric way (i.e. not burried in wood on both sides) is a bad thing. That being said, I do it all the time and never have any problem.
Since there's only going to be 4" between the blade and the fence, you won't have room to push it through by hand. Use a push stick.
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wrote:

Wow, two posts (kinda) in ten minutes. That has to me some kind of record.
Thanks, I'll run it through.
-Steve
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I have a jointer, but I prefer to use the TS for such fine "adjustments".
I believe the unsafe aspect is when the blade is close to the fence, such that the slice can be caught. In your case you have almost 3in of wood between the blade and fence. Using a push stick this should not be a problem.
Having a shape blade is highly recommended otherwise the blade could flex slightly and not leave the smooth edge you desire.
I use my TS to remove cuts much smaller that the kerf when I am making final adjustments to get pieces to fit.
Dave Paine.

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On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 21:42:02 GMT, "Steve W"

I take off small widths using a table saw. A three-foot square piece should not be a safety concern. Asking if this procedure is safe is a very good part of overall safety. I think a table saw is safer than a router, although personally I have much more experience with a table saw.
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You're fine using the tablesaw.
Anyone remember the Delta Uniplane? Now, that's a machine designed specifically for such an operation... just wish I could buy a new one, as Delta hasn't made that machine in about 20-years! :)
Woody
Steve W wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@sneakemail.com says...

I agree that you're OK using the TS and I simply don't see a problem. Set the fence so the wide part of the board is against it and positioned so the blade will rip off just what you want. Set the blade height to just a bit above the surface of the board and use a good push stick. Maintain full control of the board all the way thru the rip. I do it all the time and have been for years. It's never even occurred to me that there might even be a problem doing this.
That all said, however, I am VERY leery of making narrow rips when the narrow piece would be next to the fence. That is something I avoid as I see potential for the piece binding, breaking, splintering, or whatever and coming back my way.
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A need for multiple narrow slabs of wood equal thicknesses led to my making a "pushing jig" about 18" long using 1/4" Baltic birch that rides the rip fence. Small scrap glued to the trailing edge pushes the wood through. A handle glued to the top makes pushing both forward and down on the leading edge effective.

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On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 21:42:02 GMT, "Steve W"

It's done all the time. Just stay out of the line of the blade. thin shavings have a tendency to drop down the insert opening and then get thrown back out, but always in the line of the blade. Not big enough to do any damage, but wear (as you always should) your safety glasses.
Also a zero clearance insert helps control that tendency.
Frank
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The easy alternative is to shave off less then the width of the kerf and cut several times until the desired amount is removed. All that will be thrown up is sawdust. It's only when there's a solid slice somewhere adjacent to the blade that something dangerous can be thrown back.
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wrote:

Thanks all.
-Steve
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