What can you with a lathe?

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Make a few samples of spindles that you can't buy at the local borg. Show them you can make these for contractors on an as needed basis. Make a book of samples and take them into the borg where they can show the unique styles you can make to their contractors and customers. Let the borg know you can make custom replacements of broken items. Contact a home builder who may be interested in a special design. Build furniture for a local consignment store. Build furniture for a local interior designer.
BTW, A Legacy comes with a design pad that helps you design the shapes you need.
Remember, a complex stair spindle with knobs, flutes, spirals and contours only takes 15-20 minutes to make. You can make a whole set in a day.
I bet Norm wishes he had one. He made a 48" round table with a three leg pedestal base. He had to make a jig to do the tenons and morticing on the base. This could have all been done on the Legacy when the base was made.
Contact Legacy Ornamental Mills at 1-800-279-4570 or long on at www.legacywoodworking.com for a free DVD.
--

>jeffk wrote

>Yes Joe but sell to who or whom? my shop has been open for
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If *we* mention your name, will *we* get a discount on the price when calling that number for that well engineered product?
Also, if someone posts an item on the rec saying how they prefer to sharpen their shop pencil with a pocket knife or a chisel, will you rebuke them for not having the latest electric pencil sharpener?
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Think thrice, measure twice and cut once.

Sanding is like paying taxes ... everyone has to do it, but it is
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On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 11:12:47 -0700 (MST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Joe "Woody" Woodpecker) wrote:
---snip stuff about a fancy router jig---
Joe- I'm glad you like your tool. it sounds like a neat machine- I think I'll go ahead and get some of the manufacturer's info. I have seen this kind of thing before, and it looks very useful.
HOWEVER, the damn thing is not a lathe, so your posts are off topic for this thread. if you want to discuss it further, please start a new thread.
    Bridger
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wrote:

I have a couple of 8' aluminum I beams. I have used them in router jigs before. the idea of expanding on the legacy concept has some appeal....     Bridger
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What makes you think he actually owns one?
djb
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There are no socks in my email address.

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
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I'm a little slow on the uptake, but try this link:
http://www.outofcontrol-woodturning.com/FAVORITE.html
It's a bunch of woodturning links. If you and your wife can find some things there that get your, uh, lathe spinning, then a lathe might be a worthwhile investment. Also, check out rec.crafts.woodturning and do an Internet search for segmented turnings. They're really quite amazing, and inexpensive to make (if you believe what the master turners say).
I started doing some research on getting a lathe (thanks a pantload, Silvan <g>) and have decided that I can't possibly produce another project until I have one of these amazing machines.
My problem is that I have Buy The Last One First Syndrome. I won't be satisfied with anything less than top-notch. I held off on buying a table saw for a year and a half because I couldn't find a cabinet saw for a decent price. Now I have one, and couldn't be happier. Well, until I discovered I needed a Oneway lathe. :(
-Phil Crow
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Phil Crow) wrote in message

Phil,
Having bought both some el-cheapo and some top-of-the-line woodturning equiptment, may I suggest that you shop for a quality middle-of-the-road lathe (maybe used). As long as it is sufficiently rigid, you can easily work around most other shortcomings. Aim a little higher in quality for the chisels - I have cheap, average, and expensive - the best ones are WORTH the money. Buy the best (but not necessarily the most expensive) if you want a chuck - anything less will be a disappointment.
I bought an old Craftsman for $50 USD. It has many faults and I hope to replace it someday. Meanwhile I still enjoy using it and am slowly accumulating the quality accessories that I can someday transfer to my new (well, probably used) lathe.
-Chris
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comAntiSpam (NoNameAtAll) wrote in message

Really haven't made anything very practical with my lathe. Probably never will.
My other woodworking projects are similar to my work in that they are large project which take a long time from start to finish, thus the gratification is delayed (still enjoyed, but delayed). Also wood costs some $$$.
With my lathe, I can take a scrap of wood from anywhere (drive around after a windstorm) and in less than an hour create something very satisfying. It also forever changes how you look at downed tree limbs.
So if you used to enjoy it, definitely go out and get one. I can't justify the price of my turning equiptment from what I have made, but I also cannot put a price on the satisfaction I get from turning. Tell THAT to SWMBO.
-Chris
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