What can be used for resealing partially used contents: glue, paint...

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I have found that by far the most important thing for extending shelf life of opened paint cans is to never trust SWMBO to close one properly.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

Not a problem for some of us.
My dear wife would typically leave it open and the next morning say something like: "I forgot to tell you last night that I'm done with the varnish..." <G>
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I do the holes around the rim trick plus i usually strore the cans upside down once I am sure they won't leak. Alkyd enamel gets that skin which is always a pain in the ass. The gas you want is nitrogen. Usually sold at auto body supply stores because the catalysts for urethanes will go bad very fast without a shot of nitrogen once they have been opened.
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*snip*
One Surge Cola fan (http://www.savesurge.org ) suggested a long time ago moving pop immediately into smaller containers if you weren't going to drink it all. That would help keep the carbonation in. Simply compressing the container would not.
Just putting my 1/50ths of a dollar in. Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

You don't want to squeeze the air out of plastic carbonated beverage bottles, because it's the pressure that builds up in the container that keeps the carbonation in. If you squeeze all the air out of the bottle, you're giving the CO2 a lot more room to fall out of solution and make your drink go flat. There are products for carbonated beverages that actually inject CO2 into the bottle and repressurise it, thus helping keep your drinks fizzy.
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bent wrote:

Lee Valley or Rockler carry a spray can of inert gas that you spray into your half used container and then put the top on. The inert gas is heavy and will displace any air in the container.
Mike
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Mike wrote:

The same stuff is sold by wine shops.
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Almost all my cans are upside down now, and it helps, b/c I think it dedfinitely limits corruption to the air contents of the container. Latex/oil, o/, who knows: this may be something that could be a solution, if only I could remember which, anyways. But there is still corruption inside. The liquid contents stops more air from geting in. When right side up, no matter how clean your can is, air gets in and out. But a can near empty of air helps. Doing both is prob best, and only need lose a fraction of the total, and little scraping. I just need best containers with seals that can be cleaned, or maybe just lots of them. And how to seal them best. Then if its unlimited maybe it would be worthwhile
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bent wrote:

Brent, the important issue here is not air that is seeping in/out of the container, but the air that is trapped in a half full can. Try to use a smaller container, or displace the air.
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bent wrote:

Two kinds of glue, silicone RTV and polyurethane (Gorilla Glue etc.), are water-catalyzed. So they keep fine in a DRY environment. A paint can with some dessicant (I used lab dessicant, CaSO4 type) can make a storage environment for long periods. That paint-can seal is rather good (buy a new paint can, though; my used paintcans never look particularly reusable).
Once I took a knife to the side of an RTV tube (after the tip cured solid), and scooped out what I needed. Popped the remnant, gashed side and all, into the paint can. It was stil gooey and fresh months later.
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I do a lot of glue-ups with PL Premium now, and have decided it's easier to store it in a metal can vs. big-ass tube. The can works better than the little tube-tip condoms you can get at Lee Valley.
The dessicant is a great idea, to you tape it onto the lid or something?
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net wrote:

Actually, I had small quantities, and the whole glue bottle fit inside the dessicator (paint can had a half pint of dessicant like sand on the bottom).
Our lab also used big heavy glass dessicators, with vacuum fittings on top and greased-ground-glass flange seals. That was for the expensive samples; for the glue, I cheaped out and bought paint cans.
If you want something big, a (dead) chest freezer might do, with a few dri-z-air packs to keep humidity down.
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All of these comments are great, and no doubt reflect real-world useage.
The best luck I have had is using propane gas to seal containers. As others have said, it is heavier than air and won't "leak away". I have even used it to seal a container of "Liquid Rubber" for over 2 years and the stuff still worked!"
Not that I'd really recommend it for long term storage - but then again I have no vices (:) smoking (REALLY - THE ONLY ONE I DON;T DO), swearing* (damn), drinking (double damn!)
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I don't recall if it was Rockler or Woodcraft who carried an accordian bottle in different sizes. I don't think they were particularly cheap, though.

Poor seal at the lid/ rim junction. You would have to craft a gasket of something thicker and with better resilience than waxed paper.

And don't ya just love the crap that forms in those partial cans of $20/gal latex? You have two quarts left and a bunch of rust dandruff from the metal rim. It's almost enough for you to change brands just to get the plastic can.
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