What can be used for resealing partially used contents: glue, paint...

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I am just wondering if I anyone has suggestions for a re-usable containers, or cheap enough, or commonly available so you can get rid of the extra air in mostly used containers. It could be anything from 2/3 gallon, down to an ounce. Although glass is breakable, if I had them I'd go do all my paints right now. Not only would it be done, but you have a very high likelihood that you could clean it out after and re-use it for something else later. Is there special glass for this type of application? I am mainly concerned about the locking potential of the top. Peanut butter jars: are they any good? What about adding something to the seal to get it hermetically sealed (air tight), like wax paper in the thread: this doesn't sound particularly appealing though. preferable these containers would come right from the grocery store, after I have eaten the contents. I don't want to spend a lot, but a little, if specific.
I have (gallons/liters/other) cans of various things that get to be less than half full and then even when sealed they end up drying out. With a gallon can of paint, when you get down to 2 inches you can't even be sure if you have enough to paint a pencil if you had already done a couple in the past. I am thinking about things like glue, paint, stains, somewhat thinners, etc.
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bent wrote:
> I am just wondering if I anyone has suggestions for a re-usable containers, > or cheap enough, or commonly available so you can get rid of the extra air > in mostly used containers.
<snip> Oldest trick in the book.
Propane is heavier than air.
Just before resealing a can, point an unlit propane torch down into the can for a couple of seconds, driving out the air.
Lew
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sounds a little dangerous, eh, what is this
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On Sun, 17 Dec 2006 01:53:48 GMT, Lew Hodgett

I do the same with varnishes and oil based paints, using Wine Saver or Bloxygen, a canned inert gas. On latex paint, I cover the top of the liquid with a piece of Saran Wrap. With lacquer and shellac, I do nothing, as it will redissolve in it's solvent.
Folks with bottled argon often use it to blanket finishes.
I don't bother with glues, as I use it fast enough.
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For gallon cans, I always cut a circle of aluminum foil, using the bottom of the can as a cutting guide. Then I slide the foil disk on top of the paint to form an artificial skin. The paint will dry a little at the edges but that seals the rest of the paint in the can. Don't tip or tilt the can and the paint will last for years without any deterioration. This will work with quart cans, but getting the foil disk in place is much trickier, but can be done with care.
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I might have to try that. I attempted to open a container of urethane earlier and the urethane had sealed the lid tight. (All I needed was about an ounce!)
Right now, it's got a layer of plastic wrap between the bent and deformed lid and the container. I hope it holds up, there's almost a gallon in that container.
Puckdropper
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I use plastic soft drink bottles. Just squeeze them to get the air out and seal. When using , open let bottle expand to original shape, seal and shake. I have 5 year old latex paint that is still usable.
KISS keep it simple stupid!
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Art Ransom
Lancaster , Texas
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Sat, Dec 16, 2006, 10:14pm (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (ArtRansom) doth claieth: I use plastic soft drink bottles. Just squeeze them to get the air out and seal. When using , open let bottle expand to original shape, seal and shake. I have 5 year old latex paint that is still usable. KISS keep it simple stupid!
Yep, tried that. Found out the cap'll seal so tight it won't come off with pliers even. Had to cut the bottles open to use the paint.
So, now I get packs of snap-on-lid plastic containers from the grocery store. If the top seals on, no prob, run a popsicle stick under the lip of the edge, and comes loose no prob.
I don't use huge quantities at a time, so I buy the smallest cans of paint. Some colors I use very little of, so they tend to get thick, even tho sealed. Add water, stir, good again. I get just the basic colors - black, white, red, blue, yellow, green. I get the green becuse I've never been able to mix a dark green. Then I custom mix any other colors I need from those. I've found out I could have done without the black. K.I.S.S.
JOAT Where does Batman buy gas for the Batmobile?
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Here's the obvious suggestion, though I've been guilty of not doing it myself. When you get doing painting, staining, etc., take a damp rag and wipe all the excess drips and splashes off the rim. If you do that, you'll get something very close to a factory seal on a can, and it should last almost indefinately.
If there is already a little junk on the inside channel of the rim, scrape out as much as you can without dropping any dry chunks of whatever into your paint, and then lay a piece of plastic wrap over the top of the can before putting the top on.
If you're careful about cleaning up and resealing properly, a metal can should last for a really long time- without any need to find some different container.
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'Pro', Got the 'plastic wrap' trick from my wife, the chemist. When she worked in the lab they used something called PlySeal {?? not sure of the name}. It was a soft, pliable plastic they would wrap around a stopper, or lid, to get an air-tight seal. She used to 'liberate' the stuff for me.
Since then I've used a lot of different plastic materials. For short time storage, a plastic bag {from HD, Lowes, the supermarket} will do. For anything 'long term' it's worth the trouble to get something a bit more substantial. If you can't get the industrial 'Visqueen', a roll of the stuff sold for sealing exterior windows, air conditioners, etc. is a good substitute.
Another trick I typically use in conjunction is . . . storing the partially filled cans upside down. That way if any 'skin' does form, it will be on the bottom of the contents and the usable portion can be easily decanted.
For containers I've used everything from babyfood jars, to gallon paint cans. The handiest, for me, tend to be the instant coffee, spaghetti sauce, and mayonnaise sized jars - with SCREW-ON lids.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
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wrote:

That's a good one- I never thought of it, but it sure makes sense.
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Before I found Bloxygen / Wine Saver, I used to fill empty space in expensive varnish (Waterlox Original & Gymseal) cans with marbles or clean, large metal nuts and bolts.
It worked great and was cheap and reusable.
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Unless you have a leak.

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CW - Never had a leak from the lid. Use a layer or two of the plastic between the lid & can, and tap it down with a rubber hammer {or use a block of wood}.
The ONLY time I had a leak was in the bottom of a fresh can of shellac. An almost invisible pin-hole, it 'weeped' and was contained between the bench & can by the rolled edge of the can. It oozed out and caused a solidified puddle. And 'glued' itself to the bench.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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*snip*

That's one of the things I like about glue bottles. If they get a leak, they're self sealing! :-)
Puckdropper
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Prometheus wrote:

Also, whenever I open a new can I take a nail and drive 6 to 8 holes around the rim so the paint can drip back in.
-Jim
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This should be under not what to do if you want to keep a good seal for the next time

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I always thought you should leave a little bit of whatever is in the can around the rim so that it does create a good seal when the lid is on securely.
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make sense don't know
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bent wrote:

The holes are inside the lid ring and sealed by a properly attached lid.
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