What are the best kitchen counter materials

Page 3 of 4  
-MIKE- wrote:

i did my own countertops for a patio bar. dead easy to do. the hard part is flipping and installing by yourself. i used tempered glass chunks for my aggregate. you can also have inserts of almost anything: i used cut slices of minerals, but i've seen machine parts, shells, and other common things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2011 2:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

make sure they can handle to load.
Just a thought.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/05/11 3:49 PM, Jim in Milwaukee wrote:

--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Structural failure isn't a real concern, but increased load => increased bounce, and that can be annoying. If the weight is added around the perimeter of the room it's rarely if ever an issue. A large cabinet island with a stone or concrete top in the middle of the room can make things bouncy. Rattling dishes yell 'cheap construction' whether that's the case or not.
It is good practice to double check the situation with the floor joists. Yahoo plumbers might have taken a 3" notch out of the bottom of some joists instead of drilling a two inch hole. I've seen similar things too many times.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/05/11 5:18 PM, RicodJour wrote:

style kitchen. I have a basement, and full access to inspect the joists below as that is the laundry/furnace area, house was built 60 years ago, nice solid wood joists.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Luigi Zanasi wrote:

I've never much liked them They are soft and heat can mess them up.

Hickory but I would want wood only for a cutting board, not counter tops.

Not marble...stains easily and is soft. Most of what is sold as granite isn't...it is "granitic" stone and some are better than others. IMO, they are among the best looking but I have no opinion re utility...really depends on what the stone is.

Talc (AKA soapstone) Concrete Stainless steel Tile
All of the things mentioned have their own particular merits and many of them can also be DIY.
The main merit of talc is that it is impermeable. *REALLY* impermeable. And heat proof. On the con side it is quite soft and knives will mar it; OTOH, blemishes are easily sanded out.
My personal preference is glossy tile. Many don't like though, tough :)
The paperstone you mentioned seems like a good choice. I had never heard of it, DAGS and it seems to be color through laminate that is available in verious thicknesses. Not good for hot stuff which is why there are trivets or cutting which is why there are wood cutting boards.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2011 9:56 AM, Luigi Zanasi wrote:

tell me about this "swing for the sketch-up library" thing.
thanks
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's Swingman's (our resident sketch-p expert) sketch-up library I should have said "3d-warehouse"at
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/search?uq=1318743460118891599213981&scoring=m
Luigi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

adequate if vulnerable to moisture when the core is chipboard. Wood though is the best if you are comfortable with it and you wouldn't be here if you weren't.
A real butchers Block is end grain so that the butcher can wallop it with a chopper every day without chunks falling out of it. No domestic worktop has to take that treatment so it is only for show and looks in the home. They do look nice, but beware shrinkage, expansion, fixing method, and gaps opening up at the edges.
Beech was always the preferred wood for food preparation items like boards, table tops, spoons rolling pins. AFAICT that is because it has no taste or smell, it has no unhygenic open pores so can be scraped and scrubbed clean, it is resistant to splitting, It isn't high in tannins, it is inexpensive for a utilitarian purpose and available in big widths. It's disadvantage is that it has a high degree ov movement in service from variation in moisture content. A lot of old tables and butchers blocks needed washing down with water daily to prevent shrinkage.
Maple has a lot of the same qualities as beech but is a prettier wood with less movement. That makes it preferable.
For wet areas teak or Iroko is the thing. They are so stable that with the right adhesives, careful strong fixing and judicious use of gaps filled with silicone you can make a surface which is totally impervious to water, a complete leak proof wet area. Cool. Looks fine oiled or greyed.
HTH Tim W
BTW I liked grey slate too. It's cheaper than granite, very soft but wears and scratches in a pleasing way over the years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMHO it's tile hands down. Easy to install, if you get a chip (I dropped a cast iron skillet once) it's easy to replace just that tile. Variety of colors, very durable (my countertops are 25 years old and still look good) I've heard complaints from some about the grout looking bad but I sealed mine and it's a dark grout besides. Still looks good. I can e-mail photos if you're interested.
Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not all laminates are created equal..in fact, far from it. Assuming they have a colour/pattern you like, Wilsonart AEON series is unbeatable for performance. Awesome stuff. http://www.wilsonartcontract.com/Laminate/AEON /

No visible seams, refinish-able, any kind of edge treatment you could wish for. Doesn't like high heat, scratches which will be visible on darker colours, but still refinish-able.

Stupid money for a very scratchable product. The answer to the question nobody asked.

Buy it from a pro...like John Boos. Expensive but pretty. DO avoid bamboo!

Definitely not marble. Too soft and porous. Awesome colours though. Granite is all over the place. It can be soft, like a sponge, hard as a hooker's heart, can be stunning to look at. No warranty, seams are germ-traps. Buyer beware as there is a lot of sub-standard granite around. The good ones are always expensive... always.

Quartz, like Silestone, Hanstone, Ceasar Stone, DuPont Zodiaq, Cambria. Bar none my favourite in terms of colours, durability, seams can be very inconspicuous. Most carry a 10 year warranty and some even 15 yrs. Excellent stuff. Expensive. . . . BUT... cold to the touch, something that bugs me as much as it does C- Less. THAT is why I have Corian at my house. It is a lot warmer and I got it for free. *smirk* If I had to do that over again, in this house? A custom top (sheets can be 5x12ft approx $ 200.00) Wilsonart AEON General Purpose thickness laminated on waterproof MDF with a wood or Corian edge. Cheap, lightweight and if you use water based contact adhesive... and yes there are good ones out there, you're pretty green to boot.
You do give up the undermounted sink.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3M makes an excellent waterbased contact cement, but this stuff is getting rave reviews. http://tinyurl.com/438pgq8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 May 2011 15:55:02 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

I had bad luck with the one can of green DAP waterborne contact cement. Their red solvent-based stuff is fantastic. I like to be green when possible, but when the eco stuff is twice as pricy and doesn't work as well, I'm unhappy. The green DAP is almost as expensive as the 3M. I'll see if it's any good, to confirm the rave reviews you tout, the next time I laminate.
-- An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. -- Sir Winston Churchill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 May 2011 15:43:39 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Glad to hear that. My daughter just had Wilsonart AEON High Definition countertops installed last Saturday.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why Corian instead of AEON for the edge?
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Decorative reason? Also, you can bend Corian around corner and create a radius. If you do that with HPL, you have to have a sharp edge. With wood or Corian you can follow a radius around a radius. Also refinish-able and more durable.... and super cool looking if you hit the right colours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 May 2011 18:53:30 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

That still leaves the cold touch to the countertop. Wood sounds much more intriguing. Ebony, jarrah, purkleheartless (for the numerous and wonderful splinters!), jatoba.
-- An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. -- Sir Winston Churchill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ebony slabs 25.5" x 1.5" x 144" would be cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 May 2011 22:02:10 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

But not a problem for you rich Canucks, right? Why else would I mention it, eh?
-- I dislike arguments of any kind. They are always vulgar and often convincing. -- Oscar Wilde
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hanstone, Ceasar Stone, DuPont Zodiaq, Cambria. Bar none my favourite in terms of colours, durability, seams can be very inconspicuous. Most carry a 10 year warranty and some even 15 yrs. Excellent stuff. Expensive.
Barring cost. What counter top would you consider to be the most durable, flat (not tile) but easiest to maintaine? My limited experience with stainless steel is that it scratches.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.