What are Dremel tools actually used for?

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I love electric toothbrushes. Rotary tools are making their way into the house at last. Recently, I bought my maid a rotary dish brush, the one by Black & Decker. It's the first I've seen with a long bristle brush attachment as an accessory. No more cramming one's hand into most size glasses. They say use alkalines but NiMHs do fine.
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I had to make a couple of handles for jigs, that looked like handsaw handles. So, I just took a saw handle, traced it and made a template. Used the laminate trimmer and I cut out the blank, and used various tools to clean it up.
I used a 3/8 round over bit, on most of the handle, but on the inside of the handle, The ultra-small sanding drums proved invaluable for cleaning up and shaping the inside of the new jig handle.
I don't have a dremel, but the B&D equilivant.
James...
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Billy Smith wrote:

Mostly for cutting things in-place. Like screws, and floor drain pipe while its in the floor.
My recommendation though is to use it on metal. I cut some shims yestarday and all but started a fire. I cut some PVC pipe and stunk up the basement with what was probably toxic fumes. But it was the only way to do the job.
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Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Billy Smith wrote:

I use one for:
Coping molding with a pointed carbide burr Small, light-duty grinding tasks Cutting bolts with a fiberglass wheel
Most of the stuff they show them doing in commercials are a bit of a stretch. <G>
Barry
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Billy Smith wrote:

grinding my dog's toenails down.
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David wrote:

Got a video of that? Do you drug the dog before you start?
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Sharpening my chainsaw, hedge clippers, and lawnmower blade. Tuning the bottom of the keys on the tongue drums I made. The planer attachment works great to remove 1/64 of material on wood. The reciprocal saw attachment for cutting sheet rock. Somebody recently showed me he uses the router attachment to finish the flats on the bottom of his dovetails so they are all exactly the same depth. It's just one of those tools, for the money, that is worth having for that occasional "perfect" use. It is well made and the accessories and attachments are inexpensive.
-jtpr
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I'm using carriage bolts (upside down) as levelers in a freestanding cabinet. I used a cutting disk in a Dremel to cut screwdriver slots in the top (un-headed) end.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 20:31:17 -0800, Larry Blanchard opined:

Were the resulting slots different from those made by a hacksaw? (That is asked in an inquiring, not a snotty, tone.)
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On Sat, 18 Feb 2006 06:30:36 GMT, Australopithecus scobis

Yep. You can get a nice deep slot using a dremel that doesn't extend to the edges of the head. Easy to turn it into a Philips drive as well.
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The snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe entity posted thusly:

I like being able to use a burr to cut slots in screw heads that are recessed, without damaging the surrounding work.
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Try that with a cat.

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Small jobs in tight places and for hobbies. I build model ships and use mine all the time. WIll be startinf a couple dollhouses soon and will use them extensively there too. John
Billy Smith wrote:

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Small stuff.... I use the little bitty drum sanders to make dowels fit through holes, the wheels and brushes for deburring small stuff, etc...
Anything that you need to do and can't get a "real" drill or grinder into... Most folks use them on too big of things, IMHO... That's like using a skillsaw to cut compound miters... Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I bought a deluxe one for the wife for Christmas for her carving and wood burning.. First thing she used it for, (and it's most common use for her), was to do her nails... *g*
I thought it was pretty funny, using power tools for nails, but she told me that all of the local nail places use Dremels... whodathunkit..
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 03:49:51 GMT, "Billy Smith"

I don't think I've ever used mine for woodworking, but I do use it for small things, cutting screws, drilling holes, grinding, etc. It's handy when you need to do things in tight spaces where you can't get a full-sized tool.
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HI,
    I do a lot of small grinding and cut-off with mine. At work someone else lost the keys to a dozen pad locks, and cut then all off. At home I use mine to do some carving, but I really like it as a tiny router. I admit the I could be a wimp, but in a router base, the dremel makes short work of mortising for hinges.
Thanks Roger Haar
Billy Smith wrote:

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I use mine with small burr bits for family dentistry, even for the pets.
Talk about a money-saver.
-Zz
On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 03:49:51 GMT, "Billy Smith"

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MAN! What a great idea! Mine will pay for itself just for the kid's dental work alone! Why didn't I think of that....
Zz Yzx wrote:

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I have the sears version & made a edge routing base. I used a metal tap (I think 3/4 x 3tpi?- used a pitch gage to figure it out & have slept since then) to cut threads into a piece of 1/2" maple. Glued it to another piece of wood. Then used a drill bit to center the hole up on the drill press & drilled a 3/8" hole into the other piece of wood. Then used the bandsaw to cut thru the edge of the hole lengthwise so only a little of the 3/8" hole edge showed thru. Used the dremel to widen the slot a little. Then I removed the screw-on cover, added a 3/16" router bit (with 1/8th shank), screwed on my little 'fence' and used it to rout a real tiny rabbet in the edge of a piece of wood. Depth of cut is controlled by unscrewing the 'fence' & resetting the depth of the bit in the collet. I could have used a rabbeting bit with a dremel router base, but did not have either & was short of funds at the time. I WAS going to use it to cut the binding slot in my mandolin I was making at the time, but chickened out-- was too afraid of tear-out in the soft spruce. Will most likely use it on my next instrument. I think I'm a little braver now. Phil
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