What are Dremel tools actually used for?

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I keep seeing Dremel tools for sale but I've never known anyone who uses them. I'm primarily a woodworker but I do whatever repairs I can on my house. What does a woodworker or general handyman use these things for?
Thanks, Billy
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I've cut rusted nuts and bolts from my cars. I've cut a stuck gas pipe in my house (after shutting off and removing the gas, of course) without damaging the threads of the pipe threaded into it. I've drilled holes in tight places. I've smoothed/grinded metal parts. Lots of electronics hobbyists use it to drill holes in homemade circuit boards.
I don't think they'd have much use for woodworking, though.
Mike
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upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Lets see--here's what I've used one for recently (all related to guitar bulding): 1) Routed circular channels in an acoustic guitar top to install the rosette 2) Routed rabbets in the edge of the guitar top & back to install decorative bindings 3) Make minor adjustments to various wood parts of guitar necks, bodies, etc. 4) Enlarge holes for guitar tuning pegs 5) Make adjustments to neck-to-body-joints of electric and acoustic guitars 6) Make minor changes to pickup cavities in electric guitars and basses
My next task will be to cut out the sound hole in that acoustic guitar top mentioned in #1 above, using the same circle-cutting jig that I used to install the rosette.
I have two Dremel tools - one AC powered and the other battery powered. The Battery powered one doesn't see much use since I got the other one--it was pretty short on power.
As a guitar builder, I find the Dremel to be a tool I could not survive without.
--Steve
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I use one for all kinds of things... yesterday I used my rotory tool to grind a skeleton key down that I picked up at an antique store to work in an old door in a house I am rehabing.
I also use it for:
drilling quick small holes cutting off nails/screws (like off of the backside of old trim so it can be easily reused) cutting plastic, wood, sheetmetal, etc cutting formica counter tops for sinks (large version) grinding metal sharpening
and I have probably used it for other things that I just cant recall right now.
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 03:49:51 GMT, "Billy Smith"

I use mine for cutting small stuff or grinding small stuff. I saw a plumber cut copper pipe with one up behind a sink. A friend of mine use his to put the finished shape on pipes that he smokes. Usually I don't even think about using the thing until I'm finished doing something that would have been a lot easier if I had just thought about the Dremel.
Mike O.
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Pretty much sums up how I use mine.
--
Do the right thing. It will gratify some people and astonish the rest.
- Mark Twain.
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The Billy Smith entity posted thusly:

Polishing, sanding, grinding small stuff. Grinding sharp burrs off bottoms of newly fired stoneware. Cutting hard metal things (Allen keys, for instance). Cutting softer metal things (screws, bolts, etc.) Drilling teeny little holes. Engraving stuff. Cutting screw slots in stripped screws/bolts. Removing grout from tile walls. Routing small slots, etc.
Much more... nice tool. I've had mine for 25+ years.
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Oleg Lego wrote:

Tried that, worked great.

Saw it done, worked great.
Also cut a drain pipe from inside, beautiful.
One of my friends got one for Christmas several years ago. I think the only time he used it was to carve a pumpkin.
Tom in KY, nice to have, maybe not necessary.
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I use mine primarily for cutting and grinding (i.e. tool maintenance, nails and screws, etc), but just today my son was carving his pinewood derby car with it.
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 03:49:51 GMT, "Billy Smith"

We use it to grind the dogs nails - easier than clipping and leaves them with zero arm shredding snags afterwards.
Ditto on the other's comments too
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Billy Smith wrote:

Only use I ever found for a Dremel tool was cutting duct tape.
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With a Foredom Typhoon bur, you can carve wood like butter.
http://tinyurl.com/9e9o7
I think mine is the KB18715. I don't use it much, I'm not a woodworker like these guys, but I get a distinct feeling of power using the rotary tool with a bit like that. I want more.

It's probably proportional to the amount of handyman stuff you do.
I have the powerful one with a FlexShaft, but I am considering buying a cordless rotary tool.
Have fun.
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i don't think that a cordless would make much difference in what i use em for. i am looking at getting a foredom flexshaft of some sort and a dotco pnuematic pencil grinder as well. i currently have a ryobi that i use fairly regurlaly. but i make knives and build models in balsa plastic and resin, make jewelry and other stuff as well(yeah i know i have way to many interests) as well as woodworking. they are very useful, i used my ryobi to cut a frozen lug nut on one of the wheels of my truck a few weeks ago.
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What do you all think about cordless rotary tools versus more powerful plug-in types? I've got a Dremel Advantage with a FlexShaft. Thinking about buying a rechargeable type.
http://www.dremelstore.us/dr80lico.html
Thank you.
--
I hope you don't mind me piggybacking instead of starting a new thread.


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John Doe wrote:

I bought one of the Dremel MiniMite cordless tools (the predecessor to the one you link to, I think) instead of a corded one, and I wish I had a "proper" one instead.
Admittedly, this may be slightly colored by the fact that the battery pack in mine died on the charger after a few weeks, but I rewired it to use a model-train transformer instead, which IMHO is a marked improvement; it has excellent speed control and weighs a lot less, and the wires aren't a big deal for me.
The problem with it, in my opinion, is that it seems terribly underpowered (and it did on the batteries, too). It starts bogging down on just about any load, and is quite easy to stall -- and that's with just very small burrs; I haven't even tried using a cutoff wheel in it.
Nonetheless, for very light loads, it's pretty useful; I build plastic scale model cars, and it's great for most of what I need for that.
I'm not sure if the "50% more power" that the one you linked to advertises would be enough to make it not feel underpowered or not. It will certainly be less powerful than a corded one, but may still be powerful enough for what you want, particularly as a second tool rather than your only one.
- Brooks
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I use mine, all three of them, for working on my slot cars. They're just about a necessity.
John E.

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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 03:49:51 GMT, "Billy Smith"

a serious risk to fingers and you don't mind spending a while. I have also used it to trim up those places in Formica you can't get to. It is handy for taking apart things that are not supposed to be taken apart like battery packs.
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they're indispensable for many jobs. Use rubbing compound on the polishers for brass before clear coating. Use the sanding drums for contouring wood, like fitting trim around pipes - this is fast. Cut screws (say from 3/4" to .650") to maximize grip before installing. I drill holes in a thin scrap piece of wood with the point sticking through the amount I want to cut off, and use the cutting wheels to cut them off to length flush with the wood scrap. Cut 30 at a time, the tip don't matter - this is fast too. The fiberglass re-inforced wheels are expensive, but way better than the regular wheels- well worth the money. Anybody without one is just steps from caveman. grind your own screw heads for a slot screwdriver. ...
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Billy Smith wrote:

warm, though.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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