What about staining old weathered wood?

Hello,
I'm NOT a woodworking expert, even in my imagination.
At the place we rent, there is an old wood swing in the back yard. To the best I can tell, it has never been painted nor stained. It is some years old. The wood is silvered and weathered, and a little cracked and split.
What happens if I stain it? Obviously I can't prevent the damage that's already happened. But will it slow future harm -- or is it too late?
Also, what's the difference in *color* between staining old wood and staining new wood? That is, if I build something else (yes, at a rental) and use the same stain on it, how will the two pieces look together?
Thank you for all answers.
Ted Shoemaker
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Any time you put some protection on wood, it should help it. However, before you stain or seal with any type of deck sealer, you should clean the wood. The discoloration is a mix of decaying wood and dirt. TSP (available at Lowe's) and a stiff brush will wash it clean. Or if you have a low power pressure washer, you can prep with that as well as long as you are very careful not to fuzz up the wood.
With the wood cleaned, allow it a week or so to dry. Apply sealer as per manufacturer's instructions.

Unless you use an opaque (this is like a light weight paint) stain/ sealer, the pieces will look very different. As wood dries out, especially when left in direct sunlight, the cellulose cells shrink and crowd closer together. This makes it harder for them to absorb stains. Also, wood can discolor, streak, and check, etc., which will affect the appearance of the wood under a stain.
Clean wood you probably know about.
Chances of matching an old wood structure and a new wood addition are pretty slim unless you apply an opaque stain/sealer. With more solids in the s/s, it acts more like paint so your have a much greater chance of matching over a similar s/s with less solids. The solids will sit on top of the wood and not only provide more protection than a clearer finish, but the characteristics of the older wood won't be peeking through in the background.
If it were me, I would clean it thoroughly, and put a couple of coats of deck PAINT on it. Roll it on with a 4" roller, hit your corners with a brush. You will be surprised how fast it will go.
Robert
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wrote in message wrote:

Any time you put some protection on wood, it should help it. However, before you stain or seal with any type of deck sealer, you should clean the wood. The discoloration is a mix of decaying wood and dirt. TSP (available at Lowe's) and a stiff brush will wash it clean. Or if you have a low power pressure washer, you can prep with that as well as long as you are very careful not to fuzz up the wood.
With the wood cleaned, allow it a week or so to dry. Apply sealer as per manufacturer's instructions.

Unless you use an opaque (this is like a light weight paint) stain/ sealer, the pieces will look very different. As wood dries out, especially when left in direct sunlight, the cellulose cells shrink and crowd closer together. This makes it harder for them to absorb stains. Also, wood can discolor, streak, and check, etc., which will affect the appearance of the wood under a stain.
Clean wood you probably know about.
Chances of matching an old wood structure and a new wood addition are pretty slim unless you apply an opaque stain/sealer. With more solids in the s/s, it acts more like paint so your have a much greater chance of matching over a similar s/s with less solids. The solids will sit on top of the wood and not only provide more protection than a clearer finish, but the characteristics of the older wood won't be peeking through in the background.
If it were me, I would clean it thoroughly, and put a couple of coats of deck PAINT on it. Roll it on with a 4" roller, hit your corners with a brush. You will be surprised how fast it will go.
Robert
Whut Robert said! Wishing I had read your reply before posting. ;~)
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Hey.... I read your reply. Great minds, eh? ;^)
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replying to snipped-for-privacy@aol.com, Iqbal19 wrote:

There is a product available on Amazon called Eco Safe Wood Treatment stain. I have used this mainly to give new wood an aged finish. You know what I mean, like, a silvery gray patina. Has worked extremely well for me on all my projects, garden beds, deck, fence, gazebo. Apart from the natural stain affect on the wood, the product claims to protect the wood from moss, fungus, dry rot and wet rot. Therefore, this eco friendly product may be what you are looking for to use on the old weathered wood. I live in Ontario and the garden beds are over two years old and still look like new although with a beautiful aged look on the wood, fir. The product is made by Tall Earth. Hope this info is useful to you.
--


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Ted Shoemaker wrote:

I think to help prevent damage to the wood that you want to use paint rather than stain. I'm not a woodworking expert, but I don't think varnish or polyurethane (sp) would look right on old worn wood--I could be wrong. As the wood is old and dry, I would expect it to suck up whatever finish you use like a sponge. By the way, I don't think of stain as a "finish", but as a coloring. Of course, finishes with coloring agents are popular. Others here surely can provide you with suggestions that should be taken with more authority than mine. Good luck with your project!
Bill

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"Ted Shoemaker" wrote in message
Hello,
I'm NOT a woodworking expert, even in my imagination.
At the place we rent, there is an old wood swing in the back yard. To the best I can tell, it has never been painted nor stained. It is some years old. The wood is silvered and weathered, and a little cracked and split.
What happens if I stain it? Obviously I can't prevent the damage that's already happened. But will it slow future harm -- or is it too late?
Also, what's the difference in *color* between staining old wood and staining new wood? That is, if I build something else (yes, at a rental) and use the same stain on it, how will the two pieces look together?
Thank you for all answers.
Ted Shoemaker
Depending on how much you want to put into this project there are many avenues to take. First off if the wood is only a little cracked and split you can restore the natural color of the wood by simply pressure washing and or sanding. The most effective protection from this point would be to use an exterior grade paint. Stain falling a distant second place. If you pressure wash you will still have to sand to get rid of the rough surface left behind and be sure and let the wood dry out before finishing or painting.
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