Whadda yall think??


I built an "air cleaner" using 3/8 press board at 20x19x20. I am using 14x20 fiberglass furnace filters (2). Since I have several (new, but have no use for) dryer blowers, that is what I used inside this box. How is this for clearing the air? My garage err I mean MY SHOP is 36x38 with 10 ft ceilings. I have no plans to bring a car in here unless it needs servicing. I have had it hangin for about a week now and only needed to use it twice and I have noticed the filter is dirty, so obviously it is doing its intended job. Should I vent this outside,which I can easily do if need be for the summer months. These questions may seem stupid but I would like others thoughts on how they did it without spending more money.
Thanks
Searcher
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Searcher wrote:

the bottom. Hanging in it is a Penn State pleated bag filter. Above this is a pleated furnace filter and on top is a fiberglas furnace filter. The top has holes for sanding jobs and hinges to open it up for free air flow. It has really cut down on dust settling in the shop.
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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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Wow, that's a nice-sized shop. Your air cleaner may help to remove some dust from the air, but it is not a substitute for a respirator or a good DC setup that collects dust at the source, if you are thinking that it will help protect your lungs. And, really, how much air can a dryer move?
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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wrote:

If you vent the filtered air to the outside, then there'd be no reason to filter it.
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Chuck Taylor
http://home.hiwaay.net/~taylorc/contact /
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I was thinking that by venting the air outside I would better remove the heat.
Searcher
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Toller wrote:

Probably a good idea UNLESS there is something that he'd rather not cover with dust (like his car) near the exhaust.
--

FF


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the fiberglass one going to do the job?
My feeling is that the fiberglass one is mainly to catch the "big chunks" before they hit the pleated filter, as the fiberglass one is cleanable but the pleated one seems more effective if I change it..
When the weather warms up, I move it to the window and let it blow out... not so much to exhaust the dust it doesn't filter as to help circulate the air in the shop instead of having an additional fan..
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I just finished my own shop-built air cleaner.
A friend in the heating / cooling business gave me a used furnace blower of unspecified, but generous, capacity. It's outlet is about 12" x 15". I built a box around it with a 2-by frame to keep the filters from being sucked into the blower and to give the air some mixing room inside the box. I also wanted to leave the possibilty of using the back for filtration area open in case the side openings were too restrictive. I have a three layer filter. The first filter layer is the 56 cent spun fiberglass variety to keep out large bugs / small birds. The second stage filters to 7 microns and the third stage filters to .3 microns (about .000012" -- filters bacteria and molds, some viruses). I used a total of six filters on each side (2, 20"x20" filters taped into a 20"x40" rectangle per layer) giving 20 x 40" outside filtering surface on each side (800 sq inches, not counting pleating) for a total of 1600 sq inches exposed filter surface.
That's clear as mud.
I ended up with two filters, 20"x40"x3" with a coarse outer layer and a .3 micron final layer sandwiched around a 7 micron pleated filter. Each filter is thus 800 sq inches for a total external filtering area of 1,600 sq inches. The intake is on the sides and the exhaust is out the front. There is a doubled layer of 1/2" plywood for a top to which are mounted my belt sander, grinder and task light. The whole arrangement is about 40" wide by 40" tall by 24" deep. I'll probably put some hardware cloth in front of the exhaust to keep the safety harpies at bay.
My shop is 11' by 31'. (About 1/2 my basement.)
I exhaust the air lengthwise across the middle of the floor. At the far end, it raises up and follows the outside walls to return ... carrying dust away from my face. My HF 2 hp chunk collector bleeds 30 micron dust but is between me and the air cleaner along the outside wall. It's really nice to fetch the DC bags a whack and see the dust immediately head for the air cleaner.
Cost to build? Approx. $40. I used salvaged dunnage plywood and 2x2's for the casing, glue & drywall screws to hold it together, a slap of old paint to spruce it up and salvaged wiring parts. About $38 of the cost went into the filters and I can feel the strong breeze all the way to the back wall. ;-)
Sawdust and lathe shavings still fall to the floor ... but there doesn't seem to be any dust anywhere anymore. Even when the DC is turned off, I leave the air cleaner running.
FWIW ... I still wear my respirator ... I'm down to my last pair of lungs.
Bill
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Sounds much like mine. It's on casters, and my bandsaw and ROS are mounted on top.
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