Wet or Dry Rag to Wipe off Excess Glue

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On 8/12/2010 7:11 PM, Morgans wrote:

You're preaching to the choir ... Lew buys epoxy in 55 gal drums.
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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1. I prefer to wait 30-40 minutes until it gets rubbery or harder and remove it with a chisel or sharp putty knife. Not scraping, just lifting away.
2. Norm always uses a wet rag. I hate that. If you go with wet, use super wet to totally dilute or you just wash it into the grain and will have finish problems. Rasing grain is a non-issue. You need to sand the darn thing at some point anyway.
3. For M&T joints, you can back cut the shoulders of the tenon piece and you can chamfer the mortise edges to catch the squeeze. Back cutting the shoulders is pretty common and allows you to have a sharp edge on all mating faces of tenon piece so you can force fit it a bit to get a tight joint on all sides.
4. Other types of joints can have a kerf cut or other tricks to catch the squeeze.
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Helps also to apply glue to the mortise, not the tenon. That way, the glue gets pushed down into the mortise and away from the shoulders. For blind tenons, make sure you cut the mortises a sixteenth or better deep to give the excess glue someplace to go, else the joint will lock up shy of full fit. Liquids can't be compressed.

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If the glue is in the form of squeeze-out like a blob that is not really smeared onto the wood surface, wait til it has dried slightly and skinned over, then scrape it off. If it has smeared onto the wood, in my experience a WET rag must be used to remove it all. Not just a damp rag, but a WET rag, though not sopping wet. Otherwise there will be residual glue that will cause finishing problems. If the grain raises from the moisture, well, you'll just have to sand.
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I let it start to set on a flat surface and use a scraper. If two pieces are joined 90 degrees, take a plastic soda straw and cut the end off on a diagonal. Now use the point to scrape away the wet glue. Wipe the straw or snip shorter as needed.
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I've been doing this for about 30 years now and for the first 20 or so hade very good luck with using an almost dripping wet paper towel, even on red oak. I did however rewipe several times with a progressively dryer paper towel. Worked great and I never had the supposed problem of glue thinning out and getting into the pores of the wood. Because I 95% of the time sand a project after assembly raised grain was a non issue. Today I seem to have mastered the proper amount of glue as I very seldom have to deal with squeeze out at all. Swingman and I build lots of kitchen cabinets and I don't recall us having to wipe squeeze out.
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I tend to agree that fashioning the joint, and using an appropriate amount of glue (, and no more) is the best method.
That said, I tend to use either blue painter's tape or -- now -- Frog Tape -- to protect the joint.
http://www.frogtape.com /
I've also had luck rubbing a block of paraffin wax at the joint edges. It protects the wood from taking up the glue.
I've never liked the rag method -- wet OR dry.
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http://www.gorillaglue.com/glues/woodglue/index.aspx
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Eeeeeeenterestink. (I hadn't heard of such a thing before)
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wrote:

Eeeeeeenterestink. (I hadn't heard of such a thing before)
It's been around for a couple of years, dries clear.
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Indeed, you have, for many years. White PVA = Elmer's.
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Marketing.
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