Well, there's your problem...

The other day I was using my Grizzly edge sander, and when I shut it off it just kept right on going. So I head over to the Grizzly website to order a new switch, and the parts index points me to a stock switch regularly sold on the website. The switch is rated for 10 amps. The motor is rated for 20/10 amps 110/220. Well, there's your problem...
So I look in the manual and the current version on the website says to wire the saw for 110 you need to replace the switch. It also says the motor is 16/8 amps which is more realistic. I go back to the manual that came with mine and it doesn't say anything about replacing the switch, just to contact Grizzly about it.
Wonder how many switches they replaced under warranty before they changed the manual...
-Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But they saved 24 a unit by using the cheaper switch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 21:01:06 -0600, Ed Pawlowski wrote

Inductive loads (motors) are hell on switch contacts.
-BR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bruce" wrote:

=============================Which is why electrical control manufacturers build devices called "Motor Starters".
The motor starter contacts may have the same current carrying rating as their relay brethren; however, the motor starter contacts are specifically rated to handle motor inrush current while the relay contacts aren't.
Same applies to manual devices.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.