Weight of Glass per ft2?


I am in the process of building a maple frame for a vanity mirror (with the glass measuring approximately 38" x 50" x 3/16" thick). Since I've yet to buy the glass (it will be cut to fit the finished frame size), I am wondering just how heavy this whole affair will be. While I can guess the weight of wood portion, I am wondering if there is a website where one can find out the wieghts of various building materials.
Thanks in advance for your assistance.
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According to "Pocket Ref" by Thomas J. Glover (a great toolbox reference book by the way), window class has a specific gravity of 2.58, and weighs 161 pounds per cubic foot. It doesn't list any other types of glass but I can't see mirror glass being dramatically different than window glass.
Dave Hinz
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That puts his at about 33lb.
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so 3/16ths thick would be about 2 1/2 pounds per square foot.
charlie b
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I came up with 1.54 lbs for 3/16" x 12" x 12" if it is 161 #/CF.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Nope, it is 2.5156pounds for 3/16 x 12 x 12 at 161pound per cubic foot
John

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That's correct. [Top posted, so you'll have to look below for the reference :-)]
It's the 3/16 fraction of an inch, being 1/12 fraction of a foot, the top being a square foot. ....161 x (3/16) /12.

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According to "Pocket Ref" by Thomas J Glover (2nd edition; ISBN 1-885071-00-0):
Page 431 ... Glass, window -- 161 pounds per cubic foot

Same book has a great deal of information regarding material properties, electrical data, conversion tables ... pretty much the answer to about 30-40% of the questions posted on the wreck.

you're welcome.
Regards,
Rick
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wrote:

Heh. I know what you were doing while I was doing the same thing ;)
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Rick wrote:

What size of print does this book have? I start to loose interest when the font size drops below 10 pts and loose complete interest below 8 pts.
From Amazon: Product Details
* Paperback: 768 pages * Publisher: Sequoia Publishing Inc; 3rd edition (May 1, 2002) * ISBN: 1885071337 * Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 4.2 x 1.0 inches * Shipping Weight: 6.9 ounces. (View shipping rates and policies) * Average Customer Review: based on 35 reviews. (Write a review) * Amazon.com Sales Rank: #3,658 in Books (Publishers and authors: improve your sales)
Sincerely, Bill Thomas
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http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p0039&cat=1,46096,46109&ap=1
Much of it is 8 point or less. While it is small to sit and read, there is a lot of good reference material crammed into a small space. Type size is tolerable for a quick lookup of a pipe size or airport code, electric motor frame sizes, or many other varied subject. Mine is always within reach of my desk at home.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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I want to say that the pocket ref is also available in a desktop (ie, larger with bigger fonts) edition
John
wrote:

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29 (proportional) characters in an inch where I just measured. Smaller than 8-point, definately. But it's a clear font, should magnify well if needed.
I've seen these at checkout counters in better hardware stores. Maybe one of your local places has them, you could look it over. I use mine regularly, and have one at work and two at home.
Dave Hinz
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Bill Thomas wrote:

It's not the kind of book you read cover to cover. It's like the CRC Handbook or Machinery's Handbook--you look up the information you need when you need it. Point size doesn't matter for that kind of book. My Oxford English Dictionary has text in a point size so small that they provide a magnifier with the dictionary--it's not an obstacle to its use as a dictionary.

--
--John
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wrote

about 5.7 points or 2 mm
Rick
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 21:26:59 GMT, the inscrutable Bill Thomas

Looks like 33.19 lbs for the mirror portion, huh?

Teensy. GET NEW GLASSES, silly!
Lee Valley puts out a handyman's version of that book (with the same teeny print, of course) called "Handyman In-Your-Pocket" which is great; chock full of fun.
======================================================= TANSTAAFL: There ain't no such thing as a free lunch. http://diversify.com Gourmet Web Applications =========================
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http://www.simetric.co.uk/si_materials.htm
I get about 35 lbs for a piece that size
Larry
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Did you try google? I googled for "glass density" and found several useful references. Short answer, 2200 to 7200 kg/m^3, depending on the exact type of glass.
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