Weatherstrip for sliding barn door

I'm renovating an old timber frame barn for my workshop, and put in a sliding door on an overhead track. As I came to realize, it is hard to seal up against the wind and weather. Searching through this group, I found one suggestion from Charlie Self:

One problem inherent in anything pushing out on the door is that it is free to pivot, and even though it's relatively heavy, it actually swings out at the bottom fairly easily. I wonder how this worked out, and if anyone has tried any other approach. The door itself is shiplap pine with not much insulating value -- I'm trying to think of something that could go on the inside (it is only 4' wide).
Any thoughts?
Cheers,
Richard Crane
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Will these doors just be used when you need to get big stuff in and out of the shop or will you need to use them every time you go in and out? If the former I would consider getting a couple of small turnbuckles with a hook on one end and rigging them up near the bottom of the door so that you can "dog" the door down against whatever weather-stripping you use. If the fit between the door and the wall is good you might be able to use the weather-stripping designed for around garage doors. If the sliding doors will be your only door into the shop then I would consider adding a regular door (you can put it within the sliding door if you want to). Sliding doors are great for ventilation and for making a big opening but they a lot more work to open and close.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Richard) wrote in message

You might want to check out something like this. http://www.action-ind.com/Retail/Weatherseals/std_%20ret_ins.htm Brush seals of this type will puts very little pressure on the door.
Doordoc www.DoorsAndOpeners.com
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