Waxing Wood Screws

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On Wed, 3 Nov 2004 11:50:38 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"
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Please quote source. ***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
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Just try it - steel screws into oak with soap on them produce "iron stain" if there's any moisture around. Plain or unwaxed screws in the same piece don't.
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wrote:

Easier to drive them in.

Yes. Personally I use beeswax, because it's softer and easier to apply. I've usually got both within reach.
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 16:05:33 +0000, Andy Dingley

Turpentine disolves candle wax. I keep a jar of disolved candle stubs (about the consistancy of mayonaise) in the shop and ready to use.
Ed
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Ed Bailen writes:

Yes, it does. It also dissolves most other waxes.
Charlie Self "If a politician found he had cannibals among his constituents, he would promise them missionaries for dinner." H. L. Mencken
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Less binding while driving. I've found that wire pulling compound works great too. Its probably got silicone or something, but I haven't noticed any finishing problems with it. I don't use a lot of screws in my projects, but for general use, I can't complain. I've used wax, bar soap, and similar slippery things with success.
Chris
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Yes, it will work to decrease the friction between the surface of the screw and the wood and make it turn easier. While I prefer Bee's Wax. I was originally taught to run the screw through my hair. In the '50s most of us used a greasy enough hair preparation to qualify. These days the normal oils found on a person's hair are marginally usable unless you happen to be "lucky" enough to have oily hair and are a carpenter.
Norm
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That would have worked in 1958 when I used Brylcream. I just tried it and all I got was scrapes on my head.
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A little dab will do you.
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I thought that was the slogan for KY?
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message

KY? We're talking about scr . . . . . . Yeah, that'd work
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"Chris Richmond - MD6-FDC ~" writes:

Actually, it was Brill Cream, AKA: "greasy kids stuff."
Absolutely mandatory if you wore your hair in a DA.
(Ducks Ass) for you youngsters.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message

Actually it was "Brylcreem", IIRC.

AKA a "Hollywood" ... and "pomade" was the glue of choice around here for the front of the flat top, so it would stand up ... will never forget the smell of either.
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Nope. KY's water based.
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On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 20:33:23 -0600, Dave Balderstone wrote:

I think we've blundered into discussing a different sort of screw...
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Joe Wells


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wrote:

it a "nohawk"... lmao
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Using a carpenter's glue like TiteBond II on the threads seems to lubricate screws pretty well, too.
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I would suspect it makes them nearly impossible to remove also. And then there is that water that in the glue.
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A'yup. 'Specially the scented candles.
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

Try it. I find that it is especially good to use with itty bitty brass screws used to attach fancy hardware bits to boxes and whatnot. Without some wax, even with precisely sized pilot holes, it's very difficult to get a screw in tight enough to do the job without mangling the head.
I poke mine in a can of Johnson's paste wax. It works great, and it's easier to get the wax on than using gulf or beeswax.
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