Waxing Wood Screws

Page 1 of 3  
What are the benefits of waxing wood screws before use? Would candle stick wax do?
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rolling Thunder asks:

Candle stick wax will do, but floor wax is easier to use--I just stand a batch of screws, heads up, in the can.
The wax makes the screws easier to drive, and may save broken off heads on some alloys of aluminum and most alloys of brass.
Charlie Self "Abstainer: a weak person who yields to the temptation of denying himself a pleasure." Ambrose Bierce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bar-soap works too. I keep a chunk in the drawer with my drill bits. Just rub the threads against the edge of the bar to lubricate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bar soap includes water, and helps the screws start rusting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, bar soap gets the screw in, but it is reputed to draw water to itself, causing nasties around the screw over time. Certainly not good for oak...
Floor wax...
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is my understanding that waxing nails is not a good idea. In fact I believe that some building codes make it illegal.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If there are building codes pertaining to the use of wax on nails used for furniture building, then then government has exceeded it's bounds.
David
Richard Cline wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matter of fact, cement-coated (CC) nails are specified in some codes.
Stop to think what making the nails come out easily would do, rather than what government should or could.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For furniture? I don't THINK so...
David
George wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nails holding a building together should not be waxed. Only the friction between them and the wood holds them. Screws are a different fastener altogether and rely on the threads to resist pull out.
It may also be noted that buildings are different from furniture.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

haven't heard of any codes in my area, but it really doesn't apply to waxing screws, does it??
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I prefer using a hard wax like a paraffin or a bee's wax. Other waxes could contain additives that "may" adversely affect any finish you apply later. You don't need much - just coat the lower half of the screw threads so the wax is in the threads and wipe off any excess. When you insert the screw, if you haven't applied to much, it will not squeeze out and go all over. You'll soon be able to judge how much is enough.
Do not use soap as some may suggest. It supposedly draws moisture from the wood and starts rusting/corrosion.
Bob S.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wax for years and hadn't noticed much difference. Kinda makes sense though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RonB notes:

I think the word is hygroscopic. It is most noticeable in oak, with steel screws, as the area surrounding them rapidly turns black.
Charlie Self "Abstainer: a weak person who yields to the temptation of denying himself a pleasure." Ambrose Bierce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

hydroscopic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Either... But not hydrophilic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
patrick conroy wrote:

Are you sure that either is correct? I believe that hygroscopic is correct, but the only definition I could find for hydroscopic has it as the adjective form of hydroscope - a device used to see beneath the water.
R, Tom Q.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Quackenbush wrote:

I think now that you were speaking tongue-in-cheek, since hydrophilic means "having an affinity for water".
I still think that Charles I had it right with "hygroscopic", though.
R, Tom Q.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Quackenbush wrote:

the air (humidity) and hydroscopic deals with drawing water in its liquid form. There must be a chemist among us to clarify.
Reminds me of Dr. Nick Riviera's (The Simpson's) revelation in the ashes of his clinic, next to the oxygen tank, when he proclaimed, "So flammable and inflammable are the same thing?"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Quackenbush asks:

Hygroscopic means that it readily takes up and retains moisture, which is what I meant.
Charlie Self "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." Abraham Lincoln
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.