Waxed shellac ... any advantages?


Okay, I know that shellac doesn't actually come "waxed". It has the wax in it and you either get it in its standard form (or waxed), or you get it "de-waxed".
I've read plenty on the virtues of de-waxing shellac. For example, if you want to use it as a primer or conditioner, dewaxed is better.
But ... what are the advantages of leaving it in its waxed state? I assume that there must be some advantage, or otherwise why would they even sell it in that form?
Jack
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Cheaper?
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snipped-for-privacy@snet.net.invalid says...

If there is wax in the shellac you cannot use it as an undercoat for anything else. I would suppose the wax is when you use only the shellac.
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says...

That's true. It's also supposed to be more durable, and more waterproof when used in it's 'waxed' state. For floors, for example, before the arrival of more modern coatings.
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:
<snip>

Just the opposite. Shellac containing wax is what causes the finish to get water rings. Wax is also soft and accelerates finish wear.
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Jack Novak
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Really? I guess that I can't just believe everything I read on Usenet. ;-)
So dewaxed shellac is LESS susceptible to water rings?
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

Very much so. I've seen claims that freshly mixed dewaxed shellac won't even get water rings without a lengthy exposure, but I haven't tested that hypothesis yet.
And dewaxed is also the best at slowing the exchange of water vapor.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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I left a piece of dewaxed-shellacked fir outside for the month of February a few years ago just to see what would happen. No snow, just a lot of rain and I covered half of it with foil. The only change was the exposed portion of the wood was darker from sunlight (what little there was). The shellac showed no change at all from all the water. Then I left some wine drops on it overnight, again, no effect. Shot-glass with some vodka on the surface left an slight indentation and a hot mug of tea will leave a ring as the heat softens the film. Water? Ha! Wine? Ha! Distilled spirits? Clean them up before going to bed. Hot mug? Use a coaster.
Freshly-mixed, dewaxed shellac is remarkably durable and quite waterproof. (Ten zillion lac bugs can't be wrong...)
Ron www.hockfinishes.com
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I've used a couple of pounds of your shellac flake, several years ago when the Woodcraft in my (almost) neighborhood carried it. Hadn't seen it lately, though. Good stuff.
Patriarch
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

The wax makes the shellac easier to sand. It may also have some impact on drying time and flowability, but I've never really noticed any significant difference.
R
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On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 19:58:52 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Cheaper to make
More stable when stored as a liquid Dewaxed and bleached shellacs are much fussier than straight button or garnet.
Easier to sand. The wax acts as a lubricant, so your paper doesn't clog so easily.
I buy most of my shellac (I use a lot) as a cheap waxy liquid grade (Screwfix button and garnet). Only the good stuff do I buy as dewaxed or as flake. Before using the waxy stuff I decant it by standing the bottle for a week then gently pouring away the top 3/4 as "dewaxed". The waxy residue I keep as sanding sealer or knotting.
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http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Regular_or_dewaxed_shellac.html is a forum thread on shellac and wax/dewaxed comments. Might be helpful to visit.
On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 19:58:52 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

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